The Guardian
Euro 2024 final: Spain v England news and buildup before game in Berlin – live

So, Spain v England is essentially Spain v Spain. Football really will be the winner tonight. According to Barney Ronay: “It is basically coming home whatever happens on Sunday night. Because the home of elite football, right now, is Spain.”

What we have here are two teams hugely influenced by the success of the Spain-Barcelona-Dutch dynamic over the last quarter-century. How Spanish is this final? Twenty-three players across the two squads have a Spanish club coach, or 27 if we allow Xavi to remain in the count.

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14th July 2024 17:56
The Guardian
Trump rally shooting live: ex-president urges Americans to ‘stand united’; Melania Trump calls attacker a ‘monster’

Spectator and suspect, named as Thomas Matthew Crooks, killed in shooting at Pennsylvania rally; former first lady echoes husband’s call for unity

Before Saturday’s attempt on Donald Trump’s life, there have been multiple assassinations of US presidents.

Abraham Lincoln was the first president to be assassinated, shot by John Wilkes Booth on 14 April 1865, as he and his wife, Mary Todd Lincoln, attended a special performance of the comedy Our American Cousin at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, the AP writes.

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14th July 2024 17:56
The Guardian
Trump rally shooting: what we know about the suspected gunman

The 20-year-old from Bethel Park, Pennsylvania, was a registered Republican who donated to a progressive PAC

The early portrait that has emerged of the 20-year-old Pennsylvania man who authorities say tried to assassinate former Republican president Donald Trump at a campaign rally in the state Saturday before secret service agents shot him to death is a complicated and so far sparse one.

Thomas Matthew Crooks resided in Bethel Park, Pennsylvania, a predominantly white, generally affluent suburb of Pittsburgh. Public records show he shared a home with parents who were licensed behavioral care counselors. Those same records contain no mention of any criminal or traffic citations – as well as any financial problems such as foreclosures.

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14th July 2024 17:51
The Guardian
Tour de France 2024: Pogacar outduels Vingegaard on stage 15’s final climb – live

Pogacar took over a minute on the defending champion to take an even tighter grip on the yellow jersey

What a brutal climb to start the day. Not much fun for those who barely made the time limit on Saturday – that includes Mark Cavendish. Monsieur Prudhome waves them away up the hill, and it’s French riders to the fore on this 7km climb.

The Professional Cyclists’ Association (CPA) said it will take legal action against a spectator who threw potato chips at UAE Team Emirates’ Tadej Pogacar and Visma-Lease A Bike’s Jonas Vingegaard during the Tour de France stage 14.

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14th July 2024 17:45
The Guardian
Carlos Alcaraz blows past Novak Djokovic to retain Wimbledon title

During the very short amount of time he has spent at the top of his sport, Carlos Alcaraz has already enjoyed a career with few comparisons. Alcaraz is winning big titles at a rate that few 21-year-olds ever have yet it still seems like he has barely scratched at the surface of his talents. Every win brings him closer to the possibility that he will soon be the dominant force in his sport.

He took another leap forward in his blossoming career by producing an incredible performance under pressure and holding off his late nerves to defeat the seven-time champion Novak Djokovic 6-2, 6-2, 7-6 (4) and triumph at Wimbledon for a second time in a row. Alcaraz has now won four major titles and counting and he joins Roger Federer as the only men to win their first four grand slam finals.

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14th July 2024 17:37
The Guardian
Trump deserves our sympathy. That doesn’t make him an acceptable candidate | Katrina vandel Heuvel

Trump is likely to use this dangerous moment and event for political advantage. Our agitated politics have been stirred up even further

I was on the phone with my daughter when emails started streaming through. “Trump has been shot.” She teared up, asking in a fearful and trembling voice – “What does this mean for our country?”

What it means, I think, is that we have entered a moment when, more than ever, we need perspective, context, history and clarity about the threat of political violence in a time so charged as this.

Katrina vanden Heuvel is editor and publisher of the Nation and serves on the Council on Foreign Relations

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14th July 2024 17:31
The Guardian
Shannen Doherty obituary

American actor who found fame playing the wholesome teen Brenda Walsh in the television series Beverly Hills 90210

The slick television series Beverly Hills 90210, which focused on the lives and loves of young, privileged Los Angelenos, was first aired in 1990 to fairly low ratings and general indifference. As it began tackling serious issues relevant to its young audience, it grew into a phenomenon that ran throughout the decade and came to define it culturally; the New York Times credited it with single-handedly inventing the teen soap opera.

The show reached US audiences of more than 21 million and made worldwide stars of its main cast members, Luke Perry, Jason Priestley and Shannen Doherty.

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14th July 2024 17:16
The Guardian
Manchester United sign striker Joshua Zirkzee for €42.5m from Bologna

  • Netherlands international signs five-year deal
  • Forward becomes first signing of Ineos era

Manchester United have made the Netherlands international Joshua Zirkzee their first signing of the summer – and Ineos era – for a fee of €42.5m from Bologna. The striker has agreed a five-year deal at Old Trafford, with the option of a further season.

Zirkzee, who represented his country at the Euros, started his professional career at Bayern Munich before moving to Italy permanently in 2022 after loan spells with Parma and Anderlecht. Last season he won Serie A’s Under-23 player of the season award, finishing as Bologna’s top scorer as they qualified for the Champions League.

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14th July 2024 17:00
The Guardian
‘The street was a pool of blood’: Gaza witnesses one of most violent weeks since first months of war

After Israeli airstrikes on a school and a humanitarian zone, survivors and officials tell of a ‘daily vision of horror’

Last Tuesday evening, at about 6.30pm everything was calm in Abasan al-Kabira, on the south-eastern outskirts of Khan Younis in Gaza. For once the buzzing of the drones had died away, and there had been no sound of explosions for hours.

Like many other children, Rita Abu Hammad, a bright and playful eight-year-old, was standing in front of the school that had been her family’s home for weeks, watching the other children’s games, the traders at their ramshackle stalls, the adults talking, the teenagers trying to get an internet connection or lining up to pay a few shekels to charge phones at a small electricity supply point. In a tent nearby were her three brothers, sister and their mother, Rima Abu Hammad.

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14th July 2024 16:31
The Guardian
Barbora Krejcikova channels spirit of Novotna to fulfil Wimbledon dreams

Inspired by her compatriot’s love of and success at SW19, the Czech has ticked off another item on her bucket list

At the age of 12, Barbora Krejcikova wrote in a notebook three things that she would like to achieve in the future, if she was fortunate enough to make it as a professional tennis player. At that stage, she had no idea if she would be able to make a living from the sport but she was dreaming big.

“I think I wrote there that I wanted to be a top 10 tennis player,” the Czech said on Saturday evening, a few hours after becoming Wimbledon champion for the first time with a thrilling win against Italy’s Jasmine Paolini.

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14th July 2024 16:21
The Guardian
Donald Trump rally shooting: world leaders condemn political violence

Presidents and prime ministers denounce shooting at Trump rally in Pennsylvania and wish him a quick recovery

Leaders from around the world have condemned the shooting at Donald Trump’s rally in Pennsylvania, denounced political violence and wished Trump a quick recovery.

Trump posted on social media that he had been shot in the upper part of his right ear and that there was “much bleeding”. His campaign said he was “doing well” and confirmed he had been discharged from the hospital and had returned to his home in New Jersey. A video of him getting off a plane unaided was posted by an aide.

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14th July 2024 16:01
The Guardian
‘A home should be a living composition, like a garden or painting’: an artist’s home in Antwerp

An unappreciated ‘hodgepodge’ of a building in Belgium has been opened up into a spacious and unusual home

For Belgian painter Nils Verkaeren, a home of his own wasn’t strictly necessary. He could just as easily live as a nomad. “In 2002, I didn’t have an official address. I traded two landscape paintings for a Renault Twingo and set off into the wild. I found it quite easy to have nothing. But owning a home also has its charm.”

But his partner, Eva Wuytjens, needed a place where she felt at home. At first, somewhere in the countryside was their instinct: a logical decision, given that Eva grew up in the country and Nils creates vibrant landscape paintings, preferably in the open air. But also illogical, given their hunger for urban stimuli. “So we decided to search for a home in Antwerp instead,” says Eva. “When we visited this house, right in the city centre, we spontaneously began renovating it in our minds. I understand why many potential buyers backed out: it was a bit of an odd thing. You had to be able to see through the hodgepodge of extensions. The house was divided into numerous small rooms. Additionally, its circulation was not logical at all. You had to walk through various dark spaces before reaching the living areas.”

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14th July 2024 16:00
The Guardian
Cross by Austin Duffy review – an IRA ceasefire with bloody strings attached

The Dublin-based author’s fourth novel, set in a fictional border town during the 1994 ceasefire, feels as uncertain and jittery as the fragile peace

“But that was all years ago now,” we’re told in Austin Duffy’s novel Cross, set in 1990s Northern Ireland, “and at some point you have to get on with things.” This pragmatic forgetting has not, to put it gently, been a traditional feature of politics in the north, where there is still an annual public holiday – only last week on 12 July – celebrating a battle that took place in the 17th century.

Still, since the Good Friday agreement of 1998 baked the principle of “I may forgive but I’ll never forget” into constitutional politics, peace has broken out, and given the transformation in Northern Ireland since then, it’s surprising the period hasn’t had more attention in fiction.

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14th July 2024 16:00
The Guardian
Record-breaking heatwave shifts east as millions of Americans under heat alert

Over 245 million Americans are expected to experience 90F temperatures early this week, with some as high as 105F

A heatwave that impacted the US west coast over the past week is now moving east into the midwest and south-east, as millions of Americans have been under a heat alert at some point in the past week.

“Numerous near record-tying/breaking high temperatures are possible over the central High Plains and Southeast Sunday, and along much of the East Coast by Monday,” reported the National Weather Service.

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14th July 2024 15:53
The Guardian
UK government adviser warns assassination attempts becoming more likely

Exclusive: John Woodcock, who has written to home secretary about election violence, says Trump shooting highlights danger

The UK government’s adviser on political violence said the growth of a “toxic, dangerous environment” in public life increased the risk of there being an assassination attempt on a British politician, as he called on the home secretary to launch an investigation into the intimidation of candidates in the election.

John Woodcock wrote to Yvette Cooper on Friday expressing his concern that a series of incidents in the election campaign could have been a “concerted campaign by extremists” that “underlined the gravity of the threat to our democracy”.

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14th July 2024 15:27
The Guardian
Euro 2024, Trump shooting and Bastille Day: photos of the weekend

The Guardian’s picture editors select photographs from around the world

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14th July 2024 15:24
The Guardian
Shannen Doherty, Heathers and Beverly Hills 90210 star, dies at 53

The actor, also known for roles in Charmed and Little House on the Prairie, has died of cancer

Shannen Doherty, star of Beverly Hills 90210 and Heathers, has died at the age of 53.

A statement from her publicist Leslie Sloane, cited by People magazine, said: “It is with a heavy heart that I confirm the passing of actress Shannen Doherty. On Saturday, July 13, she lost her battle with cancer after many years of fighting the disease.”

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14th July 2024 15:18
The Guardian
Chris Woakes cherishes Anderson’s England send-off after father’s death

  • Seamer took four months off to process ‘tough’ period
  • Jimmy Anderson’s retirement ‘puts things in perspective’

Chris Woakes has said that experiencing Jimmy Anderson’s Test send-off, at the end of a difficult few months following the death of his father earlier in May, had reminded him to cherish his time at the pinnacle of the sport, and the need “to enjoy every moment” because “it doesn’t last forever”.

Woakes took four months off cricket between February and June, returning to play two games for Warwickshire in the County Championship and another two in the Blast last month before joining up with the England squad for the West Indies series. He took one wicket as England won the first Test, also Anderson’s last, by an innings and 114 runs.

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14th July 2024 15:12
The Guardian
Is it true that British people get nicer the farther north you go?

The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific and philosophical concepts

Is it true that British people get nicer the farther north you go? Victoria Miller, Hull

Post your answers (and new questions) below or send them to [email protected]. A selection will be published next Sunday.

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14th July 2024 15:01
The Guardian
How returning to competitive sport after 25 years taught me resilience – and the joy of new friends

Jenny Knight, an author who was a teen world rowing champion, is rediscovering the benefits of exercise after joining a local netball team

When I was 17, my rowing coach announced that taking a day off was unnecessary. That one time of the week that I left school at 4pm and watched Neighbours was now gone. I think that’s probably why, when I gave up rowing, I stopped doing any exercise at all. I’d had enough. Exercise for me equated to diehard commitment and someone shouting at me all the time. So I did nothing. Which in retrospect was a bad idea, because there were times in my life – getting RSI when I tried to write a book while holding down a full-time job or having a baby and getting swamped by anxiety – when exercise would have helped enormously.

It was when I had come out of the baby years, moved to a new area, but worked from home, that I felt the pull to be part of a team again. But I didn’t know how or in what sport – there was no way I was going back to rowing.

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14th July 2024 15:00
The Guardian
Raging, radical and ready for change: France’s angry green women are an inspiration to us all

From Marine Tondelier to Mélanie Vogel, they are whip-smart, articulate and unafraid to show emotion. It’s astonishing to feel so inspired by politicians

‘I really like these angry green women,” a French friend said recently, as the assembly elections approached. It’s a funny phrase, redolent of She-Hulk, but I knew exactly what – and whom – she meant.

It’s impossible to overstate my crush on Marine Tondelier, the French Green party leader. Tondelier has been a revelation in the past few feverish, fretful weeks; she has cut through French politics like a hot knife through butter. Forensically, forcefully articulate and unafraid to show her emotions, she is “cash”, as the French say – frank, funny and down-to-earth.

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14th July 2024 15:00
The Guardian
The Trump shooting is a reminder: we live in a grim new era of political violence | Moira Donegan

Donald Trump’s supporters are already blaming Joe Biden for the attack. What happens next could be very dangerous

The apparent assassination attempt on Donald Trump, evidently carried out by a lone shooter at a campaign rally in Butler, Pennsylvania, killed one spectator and severely injured several others. The shooter is also dead. The former president himself suffered a minor injury to his right ear, and has been discharged from hospital. While little is known so far about the shooter and his motivations, the incident was a grim reminder of the new era of intensified political violence in which we are living.

There has long been violence in American politics. The Democratic congresswoman Gabby Giffords was injured in a mass shooting at a constituent event in Arizona in 2011; President Reagan survived an assassination attempt in 1981, carried out by a stalker of the actor Jodie Foster. Black Americans have faced violent oppression when attempting to exercise the franchise, which for decades was kept a white-only privilege throughout much of the country not only through the cold calculation of law but through the bloody use of force.

Moira Donegan is a Guardian US columnist

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14th July 2024 14:46
The Guardian
Alfie Hewett earns career grand slam with Wimbledon wheelchair singles title

  • Brit ‘speechless’ after win over Martín de la Puente
  • Hewett had previously lost in 2022 and 2023 men’s finals

Alfie Hewett secured an emotional maiden wheelchair singles title at Wimbledon after a comprehensive 6-2, 6-3 victory over Spain’s Martín de la Puente to complete a career grand slam.

Hewett had experienced disappointment in the 2022 and 2023 singles finals at the All England Club. However, the British star erased the memories of his defeat on Court One to Tokito Oda last year with a sublime display of hitting to delight a pumped up home crowd with a long-awaited singles success in SW19.

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14th July 2024 14:34
The Guardian
Alabama shootings leave seven people dead including child, police say

Nine other victims wounded after two separate shootings in Birmingham, at a nightclub and outside a home

Four people died in a shooting with multiple victims at a Birmingham nightclub late Saturday, while an earlier shooting outside a home in the city killed three people including a young child, police in Alabama said.

Officers responded shortly after 11pm to a report of multiple people shot outside a nightclub on the 3400 Block of 27th Street North, Birmingham police department officer Truman Fitzgerald said in a video posted on social media.

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14th July 2024 14:30
The Guardian
Ruth Westheimer obituary

American therapist, author and broadcaster known as Dr Ruth who talked openly about sex on her radio and TV shows

Ruth Westheimer, who has died aged 96, was an American psychosexual therapist famed for transforming attitudes towards the open discussion of sex. She began quietly in 1980 with a 15-minute recorded programme, Sexually Speaking, aired after midnight on a New York radio channel. A year later it had become an hour-long live phone-in show.

Following emphatic success she went on to write more than 35 books, including Dr Ruth’s Encyclopedia of Sex (1994) and Sex for Dummies (1995). She also syndicated her column in newspapers worldwide, and developed games, videos, software and her own website.

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14th July 2024 14:20
The Guardian
US financial watchdog urged to investigate NDAs at OpenAI

Whistleblowers say contracts include restrictions requiring staff to seek permission before contacting regulators

OpenAI whistleblowers have urged the US financial watchdog to investigate non-disclosure agreements at the startup after claiming the contracts included restrictions such as requiring employees to seek permission before contacting regulators.

Non-disclosure agreements (NDAs) typically bar an employee from sharing company information with outside parties but a group of whistleblowers are arguing that OpenAI’s agreements could have led to workers being punished for raising concerns about the company to federal authorities.

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14th July 2024 14:00
The Guardian
Labour can end austerity at a stroke – by taxing the rich and taxing them hard | George Monbiot

The focus on growth to ease the UK’s economic ills will not be nearly enough, but there is a way to raise the sums needed

Never let your opponents define the terms of a debate. All too often, Labour has allowed the Conservatives and the billionaire press to demonise the notion of “tax and spend”. It went to great lengths before the election to assure voters it had no such intention. Now it drives home the message: instead, our needs will be met by “growth, growth, growth”. But tax and spend is the foundation of a civilised society.

Few of the changes this country requires can be achieved while adhering to the “tough spending rules” the new government has imposed on itself. We urgently need massive public investment in the NHS, social care, schools, environmental protection, social housing, local authorities, water, railways, the justice system and virtually all functions of government. We need a genuine levelling up, across regions and across classes. The austerity inflicted on us by the Conservatives was unnecessary and self-defeating and Labour has no good reason to sustain it.

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14th July 2024 14:00
The Guardian
Online manipulation expert Renée DiResta: ‘Conspiracy theories shape our politics in extremely mainstream ways’

The former research manager of Stanford Internet Observatory talks about her new book exploring propaganda in the digital age – and how she came to be known as ‘CIA Renée’…

Renée DiResta is a writer and researcher into online manipulation. In 2018, she led a US Senate investigation into the activities of the Russian Internet Research Agency and in 2019 she joined the Stanford Internet Observatory – a non-partisan project to analyse online disinformation. In June this year, after a Republican-led investigation, her contract, along with those of many other staffers, was not renewed, prompting some observers to claim the group was being dismantled due to political pressure.

What inspired you to write about what you call the “propaganda machine”?
I started to feel that propaganda had fundamentally changed. The types of actors who could create it and spread it had shifted, and the impact it was having on our society was quite significant, but we weren’t using the word. We were using words like “misinformation” or “disinformation”, which seemed to be misdiagnoses of the problem. And so I wanted to write a book that asked, in this media ecosystem, what does propaganda look like?

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14th July 2024 14:00
The Guardian
‘The classes just keep growing’: how K-pop dancing is taking off in the UK

As the music genre’s popularity rises, dance classes are springing up. The Guardian goes along to give it a try

When Xingxi Wang started running K-pop dance classes in Birmingham, she rented a small room in Chinatown. Within a few years, demand had grown so much that she was able to open her own studio where she now runs up to 10 classes a week.

Like many K-pop fans, Wang, 25, has been teaching herself dance routines at home since she was a teenager at school. Slick, synchronised choreography is a key component of K-pop, along with the fashionable outfits and synthesised music that define the genre.

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14th July 2024 13:40
The Guardian
‘Beat the heat’: Madrid looks to cool off with culture amid climate crisis

Initiative aims to coax visitors and local people into air-conditioned venues during sweltering summer afternoons

A little after 3pm on a weekday afternoon, the footsteps and voices that echoed along the hallowed halls of the Prado were silenced by a series of percussive detonations that could have been mistaken for an indoor fireworks display.

The source of the disruption, however, was not a vandal or a protester. Watched over by the eight muses for whom the Madrid museum’s Sala de las Musas is named, a tall, famous and angular flamenco dancer called El Yiyo was clicking, clapping, stomping and pirouetting before a rapt, grateful and slightly bemused audience. A few feet away sat the renowned guitarist Rafael Andújar, who had ambled into the sala a few moments earlier, taken his seat and begun to fill the air with notes.

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14th July 2024 13:27
The Guardian
‘Prop idols’: England look to reinforce scrum after series defeat to All Blacks

  • Borthwick accepts New Zealand had edge in two defeats
  • ‘Quite clearly we need to find some more tight-heads’

England are looking for some new ‘prop idols’ after acknowledging their scrum foundations need to be reinforced in the wake of their 2-0 series loss in New Zealand. Steve Borthwick has accepted the superiority of the All Black scrum was a key factor in the hosts’ success and will spend the summer weighing up possible solutions.

Whether or not the 37-year-old Dan Cole plays on after becoming England’s most-capped male forward in Saturday’s 24-17 defeat at Eden Park, Borthwick is on the hunt for tight-head forwards capable of shoring up the set-piece that creaked at crucial moments towards the end of both Test matches against the All Blacks. “Quite clearly we need to find some more tight-heads,” said Borthwick, reflecting on England’s latest narrow defeat.

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14th July 2024 13:05
The Guardian
‘Forever chemicals’ used in lithium ion batteries threaten environment, research finds

A subclass of PFAS has been found near manufacturing plants and landfills, and in remote regions of the world

Toxic PFAS “forever chemicals” used in lithium ion batteries essential to the clean energy transition present a dangerous source of chemical pollution that new research finds threatens the environment and human health as the nascent industry scales up.

The multipronged, peer-reviewed study zeroed in on a little-researched and unregulated subclass of PFAS called bis-FASI that are used in lithium ion batteries.

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14th July 2024 13:00
The Guardian
‘I sexed it up’: 1970s disco queen Asha Puthli on Warhol, Dali and influencing Donna Summer

Her spacey jazz-disco almost made her a huge star in the mid-1970s. Now having an overdue renaissance, the singer reflects on working with Ornette Coleman, helping shape a music style – and inspiring young south Asian artists

In February 1971, Asha Puthli was sitting with Andy Warhol and friends at Max’s Kansas City, a New York club nightclub and restaurant, when the DJ played her new single. It was a cover of Marvin Gaye’s Motown classic Ain’t That Peculiar with Peter Ivers Group. Excited by what he heard, Warhol asked the singer who was going to do the cover art for the group’s forthcoming album. She had a risque concept: “A man’s zipper, which opens, and the album should come out with a pink inner sleeve. You know, like a prophylactic.”

That album never came to fruition, but months later, a strangely similar image hit the shelves: a person’s denim-clad crotch, zipper protruding, on the cover of the Rolling Stones album Sticky Fingers. It was a collaboration between Warhol and Craig Braun, which Vanity Fair called the “most notorious album art of 1971”. “[I thought] ‘What the fuck is Sticky Fingers?’” Puthli tells me. “I never thought of the Stones doing music that you can masturbate to. There is no song alluding to a sexual connotation [on that album]. Or did I miss something?”

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14th July 2024 13:00
The Guardian
At least 17 Palestinians killed in latest attack on Gaza City, say officials

Dozens reported injured in fresh Israeli attack, less than 24 hours after deadly strike on Khan Younis

At least 17 Palestinians have been killed and 50 wounded in a fresh Israeli assault on Gaza City, rescuers and health officials have said, as Hamas was reported to have withdrawn from ceasefire talks.

The attacks in the early hours of Sunday morning occurred less than 24 hours after Israeli forces say the Hamas military chief, Mohammed Deif, the mastermind of the 7 October attack on southern Israel, was the target of a strike in Khan Younis, southern Gaza, which, according to the territory’s emergency services, killed more than 90 people and injured 300 more.

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14th July 2024 12:51
The Guardian
Deepfake clips of Gareth Southgate swearing at England team go viral

Videos of England football manager emblematic of growing internet trend for AI-generated memes

It is not the calm and thoughtful Gareth Southgate the nation is used to and, in the rough and ready world of internet humour, that is probably the point.

Within hours of England walking off the pitch after winning the semi-final against the Netherlands, deepfakes of the team manager cropped up on social media, offering an expletive-filled, and deeply uncharacteristic, post-match take from the England manager.

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14th July 2024 12:50
The Guardian
Luis Suárez denies Canada as Uruguay snatch third-place at Copa América

Uruguay needed a late equaliser and penalties to beat Canada in Saturday’s Copa América third-place playoff match, with head coach Marcelo Bielsa insisting the South American side had performed well below their level.

Uruguay, ranked 14th in the world, were on the verge of a shock defeat to the 48th-ranked tournament debutants before Luis Suárez scored a stoppage-time goal to force a penalty shootout, which Bielsa’s side won 4-3. Canada made several changes to their lineup for the match and looked the fresher side as they caused Uruguay a number of problems.

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14th July 2024 12:23
The Guardian
Credit at last for female screenwriter airbrushed from Hollywood history

Despite her activism during the golden age of cinema, Mary C McCall Jr was all but forgotten. Now a new book is about to set the record straight

To screenwriters in the 1950s, she was a major power player, fighting for pay rises and striking rights. To the Hollywood studio heads, she was “the meanest bitch in town”.

Now, a new book aims to restore Mary C McCall Jr’s reputation as one of the film industry’s most important figures, a trailblazer who was airbrushed from history after getting on the wrong side of movie moguls.

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14th July 2024 12:00
The Guardian
‘I felt I had no right to grieve’: what happens if your sorrow doesn’t seem appropriate?

When the author Daisy Buchanan lost a series of friends, she felt bereft – yet also that her feelings were misplaced. Here, she explores the notion of ‘disenfranchised grief’ – and learns how to let her sorrow in

When I was 17, a girl in my year died suddenly, in her sleep. Natalie was beautiful and very popular. We weren’t friends and we hadn’t really spoken to each other much. (I was a self-conscious, self-obsessed teenager and I assumed I was invisible to most of my classmates.) At the time, her death seemed like a matter for the other popular girls. Because I was self-obsessed, I was worried about being accused of using a tragedy to gain traction and social status. I didn’t try to comfort her friends. I didn’t understand that we were going through a collective, communal grief. My shock and sadness seemed fraudulent and I believed the best gift I could give anyone was space. Natalie’s very best friends were allowed to cry in the corridor and take time off school. If I tried it, I’d be attention-seeking, claiming emotions I had no right to feel.

Now that I’m 39, I regret everything I did and didn’t do. I wish I’d put my self-consciousness aside and let empathy lead the way. I could have gone to her friends and asked what they needed. I could have taken the time to get to know their version of Natalie, who probably wasn’t a remote goddess to them, but a sweet, funny teenage girl.

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14th July 2024 12:00
The Guardian
Manchester United Women set to sign Elisabeth Terland from Brighton

  • Norway forward scored 13 WSL goals in 2023-24
  • United have already signed France’s Melvine Malard

Manchester United are set to sign the Norway striker Elisabeth Terland from Brighton. The 23-year-old was the joint second-highest scorer in the Women’s Super League last season and her 13 league goals, equalling one every 137 minutes she played, constituted half Brighton’s tally for the entire WSL campaign.

She is understood to have agreed a two-year deal plus a further year’s option with Manchester United and she will be their third signing of this summer’s transfer window, following the Netherlands defender Dominique Janssen and the France forward Melvine Malard from Wolfsburg and Lyon, respectively.

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14th July 2024 11:45
The Guardian
The week in theatre: Slave Play; Skeleton Crew; Alma Mater – review

Noël Coward; Donmar Warehouse; Almeida, London
Jeremy O Harris’s gloves-off Broadway hit is overladen yet thought-provoking; sound design speaks loudest in a wordy Detroit story; and a last-minute lead shines in a knotty new #MeToo drama

What a pugilistic theatrical week it has been. Three broadly political plays, motored more by talk than physical action, that punch, reproach and argue. To varied effect.

Flaring and poking (there is plenty of that), Slave Play arrives in London having fired up Broadway. In the weeks before opening night, its author, Jeremy O Harris, was denounced by the then prime minister, Rishi Sunak, for designating two performances as specifically for black audiences. I disagree. Not least because one side effect of the primary aim of “black out” performances – to encourage audiences habitually absent from the stalls – has the incidental effect of making me as a white woman (not, incidentally, banned from these nights, just not specially invited) realise how implicitly welcomed I generally am. In 2020/21, 93% of audiences at Arts Council-funded theatres were white.

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14th July 2024 11:30
The Guardian
Nigel Slater’s recipes for courgette and mozzarella tart, and grilled apricots

Recipes worth turning the oven on for this summer

I have a soft spot for a savoury tart on a summer’s day, whether it is a deep-bellied, crisp-sided tart of quivering custard and asparagus or a more free-form arrangement made with a sheet of puff pastry, pesto and tomatoes. The version I have been making this summer is simple and blessedly straightforward to make. It is something of a hybrid, possessing both a crisp base and a soft, cheesy layer.

The crust is crunchy and light. The filling – topping might be a more accurate description – is one of shredded courgettes and spring onions, laced with melted mozzarella and fragrant with tarragon. It smells of deepest summer.

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14th July 2024 11:30
The Guardian
Cool heads needed as political fringe dwellers spread disinformation after Trump shooting

Partisans on the left and the right are weaponizing the attack and spreading lies faster than journalists can offer facts to counter them

Disinformation researcher Amanda Rogers has described the polarized, unhinged, conspiracy-driven noise in social media responses to the shooting of Donald Trump as “a self-sustaining spiral of shit”.

Rogers, a fellow at the progressive thinktank Century Foundation, has seen this before. But the scale is new and troubling, she said. Conversation on social media – and the mainstream media – is focused on the motivations of the shooter and the impact on the election, she said. Bad actors want to turn a moment like this into a broader call for violence. And they will spread lies to get there, she said.

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14th July 2024 11:00
The Guardian
Magazine guru Lindsay Nicholson’s life of turmoil: ‘I could see this world I’d created was crumbling’

In her gripping new memoir, the former Good Housekeeping editor describes the car crash that forced her to confront past tragedy as well as the upheavals that followed – arrest, divorce, redundancy – all leading to her third act

In 2016, Lindsay Nicholson was driving home to Berkhamsted in Hertfordshire from her mother’s house in Essex. It was a Sunday night and her thoughts were all for the week that stretched ahead. Nicholson was then the editor of Good Housekeeping, Britain’s biggest-selling glossy magazine, and as usual her diary was bulging: lunches, interviews, photoshoots. Not that this troubled her. Quite the reverse, in fact. She loved her job uncommonly, not only because it was interesting and fun and she was very good at it, but because it had long been her refuge: the best way she knew to avoid thinking about other, more difficult things. As her BMW joined the Southend Arterial to a soundtrack provided by Magic FM, she was all anticipation, her mind as expectant as the white damask tablecloths at Claridge’s, the hotel where she would regularly meet important advertisers for tea.

But then something happened. A lorry up ahead crossed suddenly into her lane, and not in the usual way. It was at a right angle to the road, the container behind its cab slaloming in a balletic arc that would henceforth be for ever imprinted on her mind. All she could do in the next split second was to brake, hard, and aim for the central reservation, hoping desperately that the drivers behind her would manage to stop themselves without hitting her. What was going on? Why had the lorry, the side of which was now about to fill her windscreen, pulled out? Only later would she learn that a man had tried to kill himself by running in front of it. He would spend the next six weeks in hospital, but like everyone else involved in the accident, he would live to fight another day.

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14th July 2024 11:00
The Guardian
Welcome to the Trump show: Republican convention to resemble coronation

Speaker after speaker will line up in Milwaukee to pay tribute to their nominee – who they are likely to hail as literally bulletproof after an apparent assassination attempt

The political iconography was instant and indelible. His face bloodied, his fist raised, Donald Trump stood defiant as Secret Service agents scrambled around him against the backdrop of the Stars and Stripes and a brilliant blue sky.

The apparent attempt to assassinate the former president at a campaign rally in Pennsylvania on Saturday shook the American political kaleidoscope once again. It cast a shadow over the Republican national convention, due to start in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on Monday – but potentially handed Trump and his allies a political opportunity.

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14th July 2024 11:00
The Guardian
There’s nothing like a big cake and local park for a stress-free child’s birthday party | Séamas O’Reilly

My son wanted to keep the celebration small and so we took his friends out for an afternoon of beautiful, wonderful chaos

My wife was on the phone to my sister, Maeve. Their tone seemed grave. ‘Can you not put cream on it?’ she said, conjuring images of my sister covered head to toe with third-degree burns. A more dutiful brother would have inquired after his sister’s health, but I was following our two-year-old daughter up some wooden stairs she’d decided to mount while soaking wet and barefoot.

Thirty seconds later, I heard my wife say, ‘Just use chocolate,’ which caused a half second of further confusion before I realised they were discussing cake, and their gravity of tone owed to the stresses involved in my son’s sixth birthday preparations.

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14th July 2024 10:30
The Guardian
The rich were led to believe they were different. Those days are numbered | Will Hutton

Wealth is a privilege, and with it comes the obligation of paying tax to benefit society

‘Let me tell you about the very rich. They are different from you and me,” wrote F Scott Fitzgerald in 1925. “They think, deep in their hearts, that they are better than we are because we had to discover the compensations and refuges of life for ourselves. Even when they enter deep into our world or sink below us, they still think that they are better than we are. They are different.” The delusions of entitlement – that the rich deserve their wealth, privilege and the right to transgress social mores as they choose – are ever-present. In their eyes, wealth can’t just be a by-product of luck, can it? It must, one way or another, be deserved.

Among the great deformations of the four neoliberal decades through which we have lived are not just the policy catastrophes – monetarism, financial deregulation, austerity, Brexit, the Truss budget – but also the way that wealth generation and entrepreneurship, so crucial to the capitalist economy, have been ideologically framed. Instead of being recognised as a profoundly social process – in which great universities, the financial ecosystem and the runway provided by large and sophisticated markets support entrepreneurship – enterprise, and the wealth it produces, has been characterised as wholly attributable to individual derring-do in which luck plays little part. Hence the obsession with shrinking the state to reduce “burdensome” tax.

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14th July 2024 10:30
The Guardian
The big split: why divorce rates were soaring in 1976

After the Divorce Reform Act a decade earlier, women were telling their husbands, ‘I’ve had enough!’

‘When things go wrong, it is now possible for the first time in history for the women in a marriage to say, “I’m off,”’ wrote the Observer in 1976. Since the 1969 Divorce Reform Act, divorces were rocketing – 120,000 petitions a year – but was it inevitably an ‘emotional disaster’ or the ‘unacceptable face of individualism?’ And above all: ‘What about the children?’

Individual stories gave a more reassuring, recognisable picture. Peter, 40, had ‘achieved an amicable divorce’ with ex-wife Elizabeth, including alternate-week custody of their son, Tony. Both had remarried (Elizabeth to Peter’s best friend Jonathan) and all four met up regularly to discuss Tony’s welfare. Tony, Peter said, ‘felt the draught during the worst months’, but was now thriving. It had been painful, unsurprisingly, but eventually Elizabeth said: ‘We were able to stand back and think, “How can we be sensible?”’

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14th July 2024 10:00
The Guardian
How low-profile bull-fight fan Luis de la Fuente won over sceptical Spain

Coach was not considered an exciting appointment but he has delivered silverware and now another final

The night before Spain’s first game at Euro 2024, Josko Gvardiol was asked something about Luis de la Fuente, to which he replied: “Who?” Croatia’s press officer came to his rescue but if the defender felt a bit embarrassed, the truth is that back then he wouldn’t have been alone in not instantly recognising the name, or knowing much about the coach of the selección, their opponents the following day. It hadn’t been all that long since even some in Spain might have said something similar.

Born in Haro, La Rioja, which he reckons is the best place on Earth, De la Fuente is proud to be Spanish, Catholic and a bullfighting ­aficionado. He likes eggs and chips, is built like a brick outhouse and sleeps around four hours a night. His dad was a sailor, he loves the Rocky films and he’s fascinated by Rome, reading everything he can. He’s into Julio Iglesias, and his favourite song is probably Quijote. He led Spain to their first trophy in more than a decade and now, a month on from that press conference and in the same stadium, he takes them into the final of Euro 2024.

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14th July 2024 09:00
The Guardian
As the beer rains down, one thing is clear: Uefa’s complacency puts all of us at risk | Jonathan Wilson

Journalists are not the only ones to have had plastic cups thrown at them at Euro 2024 so what will it take before the organising body reacts?

It was shortly after the final whistle had blown on England’s semi-final victory over the Netherlands that the barrage began. First one plastic cup landed in the press box, beer exploding from it in a sticky fountain, then another and another until all you could hear other than the insistent PA was the crump of plastic on desk and the shouts of journalists taking hits and trying to protect their laptops.

Looking up towards the tier from which they came, there was a terrible beauty to it, the cups with their furls of lager illuminated in the floodlit sky, falling slowly with an implausible grace before their liquid detonation.

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14th July 2024 09:00
The Guardian
Southgate’s England set for date with destiny with Spain after cultural reset

Final opponents may offer more thrills but careful planning has turned great underachievers into true contenders

Now we take Berlin. One way of looking back over England’s progress at Euro 2024 is to see it as geographically performative, a struggle to move beyond the green-fringed industrial centres of Germany, Gelsenkirchen, Düsseldorf, Cologne, Dortmund, places where even the football grounds resemble giant clanky ­tubular factory parts.

Grudgingly, awkwardly, and, for 20 minutes against the Netherlands, fluently, these Rhine-Ruhr staging points have been ticked off. England’s rustbelt football has prevailed. And now they have the reward, a trip to Mitteleuropa’s vivid, artsy, mega-city capital, and the prospect of a meeting with Spain, the team of the tournament, at the Olympiastadion on Sunday night.

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14th July 2024 09:00
The Guardian
‘Each time I read one of her books, I wanted to read more’: five actors on bringing Annie Ernaux’s memoir to the stage

As a theatre production of the Nobel prize-winning writer’s acclaimed autobiography The Years opens in the UK, the actors playing her at different ages – including Deborah Findlay, Gina McKee and Romola Garai – talk about what the work means to them

Annie Ernaux was 61 years old when, “one September morning” in 2001, two planes crashed into New York’s twin towers. “Our image of the world was turned upside down,” she wrote in her powerful collective autobiography The Years. “We saw the right was advancing everywhere. We turned away. We focused on ourselves again… we were mutating. We didn’t know what our new shape would be.”

For the actor Anjli Mohindra, the event evokes a more personal mutation. She had just turned 11 and started at secondary school. Her first period had begun the previous day. “I’d forgotten about it until we started rehearsing,” she says, but the memory swam back into her mind because, as well as dealing with world events, Ernaux is fascinated by the evolution of her own body. “I don’t want to say she’s obsessed, but she thinks a lot about her menstrual cycle and her menopause and things like that.”

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14th July 2024 09:00
The Guardian
Euro 2024 diary: the Hardest Geezer and Kevin Grosskreutz’s schnitzel bar

Our reporter samples the sights and sounds of Germany including England’s emotional semi-final win in Dortmund

Still living on the fumes of a breathless end to the Netherlands’ victory over Turkey, I use the afternoon to take myself out of the football bubble for the first time this summer. You could almost term it a “day off”: I visit Berlin’s Mauerpark flea market; I walk around Schlachtensee, one of the closest lakes to the city centre; I sit in a beer garden next to a suburban football pitch; I eat hip but slightly underwhelming Georgian food. To crown it all I see a man wearing the cream and black Ipswich Town away kit of 1996-97. This city never disappoints; like the rest of Germany, it has gladly opened its doors to Euro 2024 revelry while never feeling entirely consumed by it.

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14th July 2024 09:00
The Guardian
‘Goldmine’ collection of wheat from 100 years ago may help feed the world, scientists say

A British geneticist scoured the globe for diverse grains in the 1920s. His research could be vital as the climate changes

A hundred years ago, the plant scientist Arthur Watkins launched a remarkable project. He began collecting samples of wheat from all over the globe, nagging consuls and business agents across the British empire and beyond to supply him with grain from local markets.

His persistence was exceptional and, a century later, it is about to reap dramatic results. A UK-Chinese collaboration has sequenced the DNA of all the 827 kinds of wheat, assembled by Watkins, that have been nurtured at the John Innes Centre near Norwich for most of the past century.

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14th July 2024 08:00
The Guardian
‘Britain is back’: Keir Starmer promises UK will be at the heart of Europe

Prime minister wants to foster a new spirit of cooperation and partnership to confront the crises facing the continent

Keir Starmer has promised a new era of closer relations with Europe to ensure future generations can look back “on what our continent achieved together” before a key meeting of European leaders this week.

Starmer said Europe as a whole faced security crises and linked problems over migration, and that Britain should be at the heart of the continent’s efforts to confront them.

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14th July 2024 08:00
The Guardian
Coming Home by Brittney Griner review – from hoop dreams to a living hell

The US basketball player’s suspenseful account of her nightmarish nine months trapped in Russia’s draconian penal system also serves as a reminder of the potential pitfalls when autocrats invest in sport

The text messages that open Brittney Griner’s memoir are a chilling short story. “Hey baby I got stopped by security at customs.” “If you don’t hear from me for like one hour or more get my agent on the phone.” “Wake up plz.” “Baby text me plz I’m freaking out.” “Baby.” “Hello.” “This is it for me.”

The date was 17 February 2022 and Griner, one of the best basketball players in the world, was at a Moscow airport on her way to meet up with UMMC Ekaterinburg, for whom she played in the WNBA off-season. Back at her Arizona home it was 2am and her wife, Relle, was sleeping. Two near-empty vials of medicinal cannabis oil had just been found in Griner’s bag. Her phone and passport were taken, and she was made to sign a document in a language she didn’t understand. After 19 hours at customs, she was led away in handcuffs. “The future,” she writes in Coming Home, “was unimaginable.”

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14th July 2024 08:00
The Guardian
My brother’s mental illness hovers over my family life | Ask Philippa

You see this as sibling rivalry but if you could learn the skill of attunement, it will be easier to imagine how he feels and to get on with him, says Philippa Perry

The question I’m writing to you about sibling rivalry. I am not sure what to do about my youngest brother – indeed, whether to do anything. In the past he had a schizophrenic episode and was in hospital for a while and received psychiatric support. He made a good recovery and went to university. Since he graduated, though, he has lived at home with our parents and done very little. He exercises excessively to maintain his fitness and mental health. He says he will volunteer, find work, or apply for further study, but doesn’t seem to have done any of this. He doesn’t see friends and rarely goes out, unless to exercise. He has no income and so makes no contribution.

I have tried to talk to my parents, but my mother says she is very hopeful he will get there and my father doesn’t want to rock the boat. Both are retired and fear he may have another schizophrenic episode, so they try hard not to stress him with asking about his future.

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14th July 2024 07:00
The Guardian
Spain’s new stars Lamine Yamal and Nico Williams transform the game – and attitudes

Young football players set to star in Sundays Euros final attest to the country’s 21st century multicultural ‘reality’, says manager

In a speech in Catalonia last Wednesday, King Felipe lauded a generation of young Spaniards for their “enthusiasm, tremendous drive and huge ability”.

Although he was pleased to count his two daughters among that generation, the monarch couldn’t resist mentioning another famous member of the cohort, a Catalan teenager whose skill, commitment and achievements have, over the past four weeks, made him the most famous Spanish adolescent on the planet.

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14th July 2024 06:00
The Guardian
Trump shooting: dramatic images capture assassination attempt

Former US president Donald Trump is reportedly ‘fine’ after he was rushed offstage by the Secret Service after gunshots were heard during a rally in Pennsylvania. Trump has said he was hit by a bullet that pierced his ear.

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14th July 2024 04:30
The Guardian
Trump rushed off stage bloodied after multiple gunshots heard at Pennsylvania rally – video

Former US president and current Republican candidate Donald Trump has been rushed from the stage during a rally in Pennsylvania after several gunshots were heard. In the video, as Trump's security detail cover his emergency exit, blood can be seen on the side of his head. Before exiting the stage, Trump fronts the crowd with a raised first

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14th July 2024 02:09
The Guardian
We Love: Fashion fixes for the week ahead – in pictures

Precious jewellery, Sea NY’s childrenswear collection for Zara, and notes from Duro Olowu’s London boutique

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14th July 2024 00:55
The Guardian
Kenyan police find more female body parts at Nairobi garbage dump

Police have been scouring site in Mukuru since mutilated corpses of at least six women were found on Friday

Kenyan police said that they had found more bags filled with dismembered female body parts on Saturday, the latest macabre discovery at a rubbish dump that has horrified and angered the country.

Detectives have been scouring the site in the Nairobi slum of Mukuru since the mutilated corpses of at least six women were found on Friday in sacks floating in a sea of garbage.

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13th July 2024 23:37
The Guardian
Southgate will trust England to finish job and achieve sporting immortality

The chance to follow the heroes of 1966 is within team’s grasp but there is no room for fear against Spain in final

When Gareth Southgate watches his players walk out at the Olympiastadion on Sunday night, he will trust them to finish the job. If England expects then this time belief rather than entitlement is the cause. A squad that has spent the past four weeks walking through fire and somehow emerging unscathed is ready. In Berlin, where England face Spain in a Euro 2024 final that pits process-driven Southgateism against possession football mixed with devastating wing play, there is no room for fear.

Instead, as the chance to follow the heroes of 1966 into sporting immortality beckons, the sense is of a group hardened by previous disappointments. Southgate can feel it when he looks at the old-timers. Some stalwarts have had to make way for the new generation – Harry Maguire is missing through injury, age has caught up with Jordan Henderson and Raheem Sterling has drifted from contention – but when it comes to leadership England’s manager can still count upon Jordan Pickford, Kyle Walker, Kieran Trippier, John Stones and Harry Kane to remember the pain of losing to Croatia after playing in the semi-finals of the 2018 World Cup.

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13th July 2024 23:30
The Guardian
Richard Simmons, celebrated fitness instructor, dies aged 76

Simmons, beloved TV personality who soared to fame in 1980s with energetic fitness videos, had birthday on Friday

The fitness instructor Richard Simmons, who rocketed to fame in the 1980s with up-tempo neon-colored exercise videos such as Sweatin’ to the Oldies, has died.

Simmons had just thanked fans on social media for birthday wishes after he turned 76 on Friday. “I never got so many messages about my birthday in my life!” Simmons wrote on X, formerly known as Twitter. “I am sitting here writing emails. Have a most beautiful rest of your Friday.”

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13th July 2024 23:21
The Guardian
De la Fuente plays down Spain’s status as favourites against England in final

  • Spain have been standout team during tournament
  • De la Fuente: ‘If we are not focused, we won’t win’

Luis de la Fuente said “favourites are for the bookmakers” as the Spanish manager attempted to play down growing expectations of his side before the European Championship final.

Spain have been the standout team of Euro 2024 so far, beating Croatia, Italy, Germany and France in dazzling style on the road to their match-up against England in Berlin. But the head coach was at pains to point out that the final will be one between “equals” and warned that their winning streak could break “at any time”.

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13th July 2024 22:24
The Guardian
Tactical breakdown: where the Euro 2024 final will be won and lost

Spain have been the outstanding team but if England can shut down the supply, Southgate’s men can make history

Spain have been by far the most fluent side at the Euros, by far the best side at the Euros, and much of the reason for that has been their two youthful wingers, Lamine Yamal and Nico Williams. They give Spain a verticality that they have at times lacked since their golden age came to an end at the 2014 World Cup and, beyond that, Lamine Yamal appears to be blessed with that extra quality that elevates the true greats.

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13th July 2024 21:00
The Guardian
Labour’s ‘rooftop revolution’ to deliver solar power to millions of UK homes

Ed Miliband sets new rules on solar panels and approves three giant solar farms as Labour seeks to end years of Tory inaction

Keir Starmer’s Labour government unveils plans for a “rooftop revolution” today that will see millions more homes fitted with solar panels in order to bring down domestic energy bills and tackle the climate crisis.

The energy secretary, Ed Miliband, also took the hugely controversial decision this weekend to approve three massive solar farms in the east of England that had been blocked by Tory ministers.

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13th July 2024 20:14
The Guardian
Cars paired with buildings of the same vintage – in pictures

Architectural photographer Daniel Hopkinson and architect John Piercy Holroyd realised they had a shared passion for modernist buildings and car design when they separately turned up to photograph a building, both driving an Alfa Romeo 159. From there began a two-year collaboration, A Time a Place, which pairs every European Car of the Year of the past 60 years with a building of the same vintage. “The project aims to present everyday vehicles that used to be a common sight but have now all but disappeared against architecture that has survived,” says Holroyd. Beginning with the 1964 Rover P6 outside the Crystal Palace sports centre, it includes a Fiat 124 in front of a Coventry tower block and a Porsche 928 outside the Sainsbury Centre in Norwich. “That first shoot was a real test for us,” says Hopkinson. “It was a constant challenge to persuade members of the public to not park in front of the building.”

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13th July 2024 18:00
The Guardian
Artist punches holes in UN climate report six hours a day for Dutch installation

Johannes-Harm Hovinga has to take painkillers to complete 20-day artistic protest at Museum Arnhem

Every day for the last two weeks, Johannes-Harm Hovinga has sat at a raised table in Museum Arnhem, using a two-hole page puncher to systematically perforate the 7,705-page sixth assessment report produced by the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

He has printed it out on coloured paper and the result is a vibrant heap piling up at the artist’s feet.

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13th July 2024 17:02
The Guardian
Like Lamine Yamal, I mixed school with football’s glare – and it is no bad thing | Karen Carney

Being thrust into the spotlight as a teen can be freeing and fun. Spain’s young star is proof of this

A lot is being made of Lamine Yamal being a prodigious 16-year-old at the Euros but by the time the final against England kicks off on Sunday, he will be an old hand after celebrating his 17th birthday on Saturday. He has already come of age by mixing playground football with decision-making beyond his years. Like Lamine Yamal, I made my first-team debut while still at school – I was 14 when I was fast-tracked by Birmingham City. Some might see it as a daunting prospect to be brought into an adult environment while most people of the same age are worrying about exams but, and I know it sounds weird, I believe it is the best time to move up to elite football.

I played in a European Championship when I was 17, scoring an injury-time winner against Finland in front of a huge crowd, and it was pure excitement to be part of the national team at such a young age. Becoming an international footballer as a teenager means you have been on an upward trajectory your whole life, so it is important to keep doing what has helped you succeed and not change because circumstances have.

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13th July 2024 17:00
The Guardian
Belgium museum wrestles with colonial past, with 40,000 objects tainted with violence

Brussels’ AfricaMuseum, founded to glorify a brutal project, faces demands for restitution of exquisite treasures stolen from Belgian Congo

For years, the lustrous copper and glass necklace was on display at the Royal Museum for Central Africa in Tervuren, east of Brussels. Reputed to have belonged to a notorious 19th-century trader of enslaved people, it has 10 bright gilded copper beads suspended on silk, with red glass “jewels” on an intricate medallion. But nobody really knew how the jewellery from central Africa came to be in Belgium.

The museum first registered the necklace in 1959. A decade earlier, a Greek resident of the former Belgian Congo tried unsuccessfully to sell it to the museum. He had acquired it from an anonymous Belgian mechanic, who in turn had bought it from a Congolese chief – or so the archives said.

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13th July 2024 17:00
The Guardian
Meet the young Tories fighting to change their old party: ‘Where do we go now?’

As the Conservatives lick their wounds, a new generation of activists fear an extended period in the political wilderness

When Jayde Tanisha Edwards saw the exit poll on 4 July, she was shocked. “I think everybody came to the conclusion that the Conservatives were going to lose, but I don’t think we realised how badly we were going to lose,” she says.

Edwards is an unlikely Tory activist. She is 25 years old, and when she got involved with the party some years ago – standing as a councillor in 2019 – she was a teenage mother living in temporary accommodation. Although everyone in her family and community supported Labour, she was attracted by the Conservative message of aspiration. “It was that fundamental belief in prosperity and being able to build yourself up, and just do whatever you want to do,” she says. Most people in her age group do not share this view: just 8% of people under 25 voted Conservative on 4 July. In 2019, it was 21%. With so few in their age group supporting the party, young Conservative members are a vanishingly small number. Even Edwards, a committed activist who is out knocking on doors in every local and general election, is uncertain. “During this campaign, that fire and that passion for young voters just wasn’t there,” she says. “So how can I convince people on the doorstep?”

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13th July 2024 16:40
The Guardian
A mystery writer planned to retire. Now she’s leading a team of genetic detectives – and giving murder victims back their names

Working from her California bungalow, Margaret Press, 77, leads a pioneering team of volunteers in the field of genetic genealogy. Thus far, they’ve identified the remains of more than 100 Jane and John Does

For 37 years, the young woman remained nameless. She was known only as “Buckskin girl” for the leather poncho she wore when she was found, strangled, in an Ohio ditch in 1981.

That was until almost four decades later, when two women in California took up her case. In 2018, Margaret Press, a retired linguist, author and computer programmer, and Colleen Fitzpatrick, a nuclear physicist and forensic genealogist, ran DNA evidence from the crime scene through an ancestry database, looking for the victim’s closest relatives.

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13th July 2024 15:00
The Guardian
Police arrest man after human remains found in Bristol and London

Man, 34, arrested at Bristol Temple Meads early on Saturday while another man arrested in Greenwich released without charge

A man has been arrested in connection with an investigation into the discovery of human remains on Clifton suspension bridge in Bristol and in west London, police have said.

A 34-year-old man was arrested at Bristol Temple Meads railway station in the early hours of Saturday and taken into custody. He will be taken to London for questioning.

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13th July 2024 14:53
The Guardian
‘Rule of the lawless’: what does the authoritarian playbook look like?

Ruth Ben-Ghiat, a historian and professor, on the contemporary threat of authoritarianism in the US

Donald Trump has glibly remarked that he would be “a dictator on day one” if elected to a second term, and experts on authoritarianism say we should take him seriously.

The supreme court’s ruling earlier this month giving presidents broad immunity from criminal prosecution heightened the risk that Trump could follow through with that plan.

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13th July 2024 13:00
The Guardian
Bushey crossbow killings: family of victims say they are ‘devastated’

BBC racing commentator John Hunt and his daughter thank people for support after his wife and two daughters killed

John Hunt, the BBC racing commentator whose wife and two daughters were killed in a crossbow attack, has spoken of the “devastation” his family is suffering.

Carol Hunt and her two daughters, Hannah Hunt, 28, and Louise Hunt, 25, were found injured at a home in Bushey, Hertfordshire, on Tuesday and died shortly after at the scene.

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13th July 2024 12:34
The Guardian
‘I was sleepwalking through a horror’: Kyiv left reeling by deadly Russian attack on hospital

Last Monday’s strike brought terror to the Ukrainian capital, but also a renewed sense of solidarity in the face of tragedy

It was Monday lunchtime and Eka Grbich was waiting to see her doctor at a private maternity clinic in Kyiv. The news that morning was terrible. Ukraine was under a massive Russian attack. One cruise missile hit the capital’s main Okhmatdyt children’s hospital. Another destroyed a block of flats, killing and entombing many of those inside.

Grbich posted distressing images from the hospital on her Instagram account. She made a couple of work calls. And then, suddenly, her own world went dark. “There was a very loud noise. It happened in one second. There was smoke and I couldn’t breathe. I didn’t feel pain. I was thinking: ‘Am I alive?’. Somebody helped me to stand up.”

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13th July 2024 12:00
The Guardian
‘There is mystery and it’s also slightly disturbing’: Phil Doherty’s best phone picture

The absence of a body adds intrigue to this shot of the photographer’s daughter on a rope swing

Phil Doherty took this photograph on a family walk in a Warwickshire woodland in 2020. It was near the end of the first lockdown, and Doherty, his wife, Lisa, and their two daughters, Lulu and Pearl, had taken the opportunity for a spot of rule-abiding recreation.

“We went to Oversley Wood and stopped by this rope swing. There was strong sunlight streaming through the leaves, creating pockets of brightness among the deep shadows of the trees,” Doherty says. “I’m always looking at light and shadow to create a strong image, and as Pearl was swinging back and forth, I noticed she would enter these pockets of light.”

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13th July 2024 11:00
The Guardian
‘I feel sick’: couple say new-build home turned into disaster valued at £1

A couple’s Barratt house that surveyors say should be worth £350,000 has been left almost worthless due to defects

When Dayle Dixon and Mark Lee bought an attractive new house on the outskirts of Ivybridge in Devon in 2018, they believed it would be their forever home. But less than six years later it has been valued at just £1, and the couple are desperate to move out.

Dixon, 53, and Lee, 59, had not owned a property before, and bought their home, in an estate called Lucerne Fields, using, in part, almost £55,000 borrowed through the government’s help-to-buy scheme.

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13th July 2024 11:00
The Guardian
Climate crisis has impact on insects’ colours and sex lives, study finds

Scientists fear adaptations to global heating may leave some species struggling to mate successfully

An ambush bug with a darker-coloured body is better at snagging a sexual partner than its brighter counterpart when it is chilly. Darker males can warm up more easily in the early mornings, and therefore get busy while everybody else is still warming up.

This is one of the many examples of how temperature affects colouring in insects, and in turn can affect their ability to mate, according to a new review article published in the journal Ecology and Evolution.

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13th July 2024 09:00
The Guardian
Twenty-two students dead after school in Nigeria collapses during classes

More than 154 people were initially reported trapped under the rubble but police say 132 have been rescued and treated for injuries

A school in north-central Nigeria collapsed during morning classes on Friday, initially trapping about 154 students and setting off a frantic search for those in the rubble. Authorities say 22 died.

The two-storey Saints Academy college in Plateau state’s Busa Buji community caved in shortly after students, many of whom were 15 or younger, arrived for classes.

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13th July 2024 06:20
The Guardian
Marina Hyde’s career advice for Joe Biden, the world’s smallest stuntman, Philippa Perry on ‘failure’, and could you forgive your childhood bully? – podcast

Marina Hyde advises the US president: ‘Walk to podium, smile, wave goodbye’; ‘I’m a failure, in debt and my partner is pregnant’ – Philippa Perry helps one man open up; Superman, Frodo and Star Wars: the stunning life and career of Kiran Shah; actor Katy Wix confronts a painful memory when she gets a message out of the blue

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13th July 2024 06:00
The Guardian
Alec Baldwin’s Rust shooting trial dismissed after lawyers say evidence was withheld

New Mexico judge agrees charges should be dropped after lawyers said state ‘buried’ evidence about live ammunition

Alec Baldwin’s involuntary manslaughter trial came to a dramatic end on Friday, after a New Mexico judge dismissed the case against the actor and found that the state had improperly withheld evidence related to how live rounds of ammunition ended up on the film set where the cinematographer Halyna Hutchins was fatally shot.

Just days after courtroom proceedings had begun, Judge Mary Marlowe Sommer ruled in favor of the defense and agreed that the charges against Baldwin should be dropped, finding that the state had concealed evidence that would have been favorable to the actor. The dismissal, made with prejudice, puts an end to the involuntary manslaughter case against Baldwin.

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13th July 2024 01:43
The Guardian
Two French rugby players charged with aggravated rape in Argentina

Officials in Mendoza say players met the victim at a nightclub and violently assaulted her in a hotel room

Prosecutors in Argentina have charged two French rugby players with aggravated rape, in the grisly case of a woman who said she was repeatedly assaulted by the athletes after they took her back to their hotel room and prevented her from leaving.

The prosecutor’s office in the western city of Mendoza – where the alleged assault took place last Sunday following the French team’s test match against the Argentinian Pumas – ordered the two players, Oscar Jegou and Hugo Auradou, to remain in detention until trial.

After being arrested in Buenos Aires, Jegou, 21, and Auradou, 20, were transferred 1,000km (620 miles) to Mendoza on Thursday for their first court appearance. They chose not to testify in Friday’s hearing.

The French Rugby Federation had previously said that the players admitted to having consensual sex with the alleged victim and denied any acts of violence.

The prosecutors said the court would soon decide whether to grant the defendants’ request for house arrest.

The account of the assault – provided by Natacha Romano, the lawyer of the victim – has drawn outrage in France and caused a stir in Argentina, where recent scandals involving professional athletes have prompted questions within the greater sports community about misogyny and sexual violence.

The woman says that after meeting the players at a nightclub, she was taken to their hotel room and subjected to violent, non-consensual sexual acts and prevented from leaving. After escaping the hotel room, Romano said the victim filed a police complaint and underwent physical examinations.

The charges of aggravated sexual assault in Argentina carry the maximum sentence of 20 years in prison. The mandatory minimum is eight years.

Authorities said that they would move the defendants to another jail later on Friday.

Information and support for anyone affected by rape or sexual abuse issues is available from the following organisations. In the US, Rainn offers support on 800-656-4673. In the UK, Rape Crisis offers support on 0808 500 2222. In Australia, support is available at 1800Respect (1800 737 732). Other international helplines can be found at ibiblio.org/rcip/internl.html

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12th July 2024 19:53
The Guardian
Mr Starmer goes to Washington: how the PM made his world stage entrance

On his US visit, Keir Starmer took advantage of a well-timed chance to meet other Nato leaders – not all natural allies

As Keir Starmer arrived at the Oval Office, Joe Biden was at the door to meet him. “Come on in, man,” the US president told him. The invitation was not simply to enter the heart of the White House, but also the major league of world leaders.

The day before, on the flight to Washington DC for the Nato summit on Tuesday, Starmer admitted that the days since the Labour party had pulled off its landslide election victory had been a bit of a whirlwind.

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12th July 2024 18:17
The Guardian
The week around the world in 20 pictures

Russian airstrikes in Kyiv, the aftermath of Hurricane Beryl in Texas and Spain’s Lamine Yamal at Euro 2024: the last seven days as captured by the world’s leading photojournalists

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12th July 2024 17:44
The Guardian
Ambani wedding: after months of celebrations, the ‘Windsors of India’ finally set to marry

Power couple Anant Ambani and Radhika Merchant set to marry in Mumbai with entire spectacle likely to cost upwards of $600m

To many in India, it is hard to remember a time when the Ambani wedding wasn’t taking place.

The marriage of the son of India’s richest man, the billionaire Mukesh Ambani, to the daughter of a millionaire was never going to be a humble affair. The industrialist is worth an estimated $120bn and over the years the Ambani family has not shied away from flashing its cash extravagantly, whether on the world’s most expensive home – a 27-storey skyscraper mansion that towers over Mumbai – or on what was previously India’s most expensive wedding, spending almost $100m on their daughter’s nuptials in 2018 where Beyoncé performed.

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12th July 2024 17:06
The Guardian
Natalie Portman on love, divorce and Paul Mescal: ‘I’m very in awe of his talent’

She may have been on screen since she was 12, but with new drama Lady in the Lake, her TV career is only just beginning. The Oscar winner talks antisemitism, getting threatened on set – and the pictures that lit up the internet

Over Thanksgiving brisket, 20 years of marriage ends. Maddie Schwartz walks out of her Baltimore home, with its new kitchen (“I thought you liked the new kitchen,” says her clueless husband), a free woman. In the seven-part Lady in the Lake, Natalie Portman plays Maddie, whose childhood ambition to be an investigative journalist is unleashed after she explodes her own life – and hustles on to the city paper, the Baltimore Star.

It is Portman’s first real venture into television in a career that has spanned 30 years. From her film debut as a 12-year-old in Leon to her Oscar-winning ballet dancer in Black Swan, blockbusters (Star Wars’ Padmé Amidala and Thor’s Jane Foster) and intelligent indies such as Closer, she’s never been on the small screen. Why? “I just didn’t have the right project,” says Portman over a scratchy line from LA. “This felt natural because it was a character I felt excited to explore in this form – it’s such a playground when you have seven hours.”

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12th July 2024 14:00
The Guardian
Spain v England: who will win? And the Southgate verdict - Football Daily podcast

Max Rushden is joined by Barry Glendenning, Barney Ronay and Jonathan Wilson to preview the Euro 2024 final between England and Spain

Follow Football Weekly wherever you get your podcasts and join the conversation on Facebook, Twitter and email.

On the podcast today: England play Spain on Sunday in the final of Euro 2024, but before we preview that, can Barry and Barney agree on Gareth Southgate’s place in the pantheon of largely disappointing England managers?

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12th July 2024 12:57
The Guardian
Inside Mexico’s anti-avocado militias – podcast

The spread of the avocado is a story of greed, ambition, corruption, water shortages, cartel battles and, in a number of towns and villages, a fierce fightback. By Alexander Sammon

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12th July 2024 06:00
The Guardian
Anne Applebaum on autocracies and signs of America’s move to join them - podcast

Back in December Donald Trump said the quiet bit out loud when he announced he wanted to be a dictator – if only on day one. Looking around the world in the 21st century, autocracy is getting a new lease of life – authoritarian regimes are working together, and the danger to democracies like the United States is getting closer to home.

This week, Jonathan Freedland is joined by the political commentator and author Anne Applebaum to look at what the US should be doing to tackle the growing threat of autocracy

Archive: CNN, CSPAN, PBS Newshour, MSNBC, Fox News, AP News, DW News

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12th July 2024 06:00
The Guardian
Euro 2024: is it coming home? - podcast

How did Gareth Southgate get the England team to the Euro 2024 final? Barney Ronay reports

England will be playing Spain in the Euro 2024 final on Sunday. Is football coming home?

Barney Ronay, chief sports writer for the Guardian, tells Hannah Moore why this is such a momentous moment for the England manager, Gareth Southgate.

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12th July 2024 04:00
The Guardian
Shelley Duvall was a sublime and subversive screen presence | Peter Bradshaw

The unique and often misunderstood actor, who has died at the age of 75, was frequently at her best with Robert Altman and memorably terrorised by Stanley Kubrick

Shelley Duvall, star of The Shining and Annie Hall, dies aged 75

It was Shelley Duvall’s destiny to become most widely known for a single film or maybe for a single poster image from it, shockingly and cartoonishly explicit. The image certainly did justice to her intensity and capacity for utterly unselfconscious performance, but said nothing about the subtlety, strength, wit and unfakable superstar quality that otherwise marked her work.

This was her Wendy Torrance in Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining in 1980, playing the terrified wife of Jack Nicholson’s Jack Torrance, marooned together in a haunted offseason hotel. To the right of the poster’s frame, Duvall’s wide-open eyes and mouth – black chasms of fear, an almost supernatural and faintly eroticised image. To the left, the grinningly crazy face of Nicholson as he crashes through the door with an axe, intent on killing her. For many, the image came to epitomise the sexual politics of Hollywood that shaped (but did not destroy) Duvall’s career. For all that he’s sweatily deranged, Nicholson looks relaxed and enjoying himself. Duvall looks genuinely afraid, a testament of course to her talent, but it’s uncomfortable to perceive given what we later found out about the toll that The Shining took on her, endless takes and punishing schedules without a word of emollient praise, having to deal with those alpha males Kubrick and Nicholson.

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11th July 2024 19:54
The Guardian
Share your memories of the 1974 restoration of Greek democracy

Ahead of the 50th anniversary, we’d like to speak with Greek about their memories of the period

Θέλουμε να μιλήσουμε με Έλληνες για τις αναμνήσεις τους για αυτήν την περίοδο

Ahead of the 50-year anniversary of the restoration of Greek democracy, we want to speak with people from around the country about their memories of the time, as well as the seven-year military dictatorship that preceded it. What is its legacy?

If you weren’t alive during the period, tell us about how you were taught about it and about life in Greece today.

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11th July 2024 17:08
The Guardian
The experts: oncologists on the simple, doable, everyday things they do to try to prevent cancer

Cancer doctors know better than anyone how you can give yourself the best possible chance of avoiding a disease that one in two of us will get. Here, they share the tips that they live by

Despite the fact that one in two people will get cancer, many of us are ill informed about what we can do to prevent it. How do oncologists live their lives based on what they know? Doctors share the secrets of living healthily and the risks worth taking – or not.

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11th July 2024 11:00
The Guardian
‘Lesbian’ seagulls and ‘gay’ rams: the endless sexual diversity of nature – podcast

Same-sex sexual behaviours have been reported in a wide variety of species, and a new study suggests that, although animal scientists widely observe it, they seldom publish about same-sex sexual behaviour in primates and other mammals. To find out why and to hear about some of the examples of sexual diversity from the animal kingdom, Ian Sample hears from Josh Davis, a science writer at the Natural History Museum in London and author of the book A Little Gay Natural History

Penguin noises by permission of freesound.org

Read more on animal homosexual behaviour

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11th July 2024 06:00
The Guardian
The ‘Hawk Tuah’ girl and the making of TikTok stars – podcast

Hailey Welch, AKA the ‘Hawk Tuah’ girl, is everywhere after her viral street interview. Chanté Joseph talks to the journalists Alaina Demopoulos and Cat Zhang about Welch’s overnight celebrity, the proliferation of street interviews on the platform and what this means for ‘virality’ in 2024

Archive: YouTube (The Joe Rogan Experience, Piers Morgan Uncensored, Tim and Dee TV, Plan Bri Uncut, TheEllenShow, After Midnight, Paramount Pictures), Tik Tok (theharrisalterman, viralinterviews, fortune, salimzwrld, harry.daniels, calebwsimpson, boyroomshow, streetheartsnyc, doseofsociety), Girls Gone Wild: Live from Spring Break (2003)

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11th July 2024 06:00
The Guardian
Before-and-after visuals show damage to Ukraine’s biggest children’s hospital – video

Footage shows the extent of damage to children's hospital in the Ukrainian capital of Kyiv. Russia hit the hospital with a missile on 8 July and launched missile attacks on other cities across Ukraine. At least 26 people were killed in the deadliest wave of airstrikes in months

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10th July 2024 16:28
The Guardian
Heavy rains flood streets and trap hundreds in China – video report

Heavy rainfall flooded streets and triggered landslides in China’s south-western municipality of Chongqing, the state broadcaster CCTV reported on Wednesday. In Kaizhou district, more than 450 people were displaced as water levels from the Nan and Puli rivers, tributaries of the Yangtze, reached 4 metres. In Badong county in Hubei province, rescuers evacuated residents from buildings and removed vehicles partly submerged in flood water

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10th July 2024 13:16
The Guardian
Tell us your bridesmaid confessions

Has being a bridesmaid ever cost you a small fortune? Or have you had to deal with a bride making other outlandish requests? If so, we want to hear about it

Being asked to be a bridesmaid can be a honour, a privilege – and very expensive. Increasingly, the bridal party are being asked to pay for professional hair and make-up, as well as a dress or shoes – in addition to the often astronomical cost of attending a hen do or bachelorette party.

Recently, a Reddit user went viral after revealing that her cousin had asked guests to pay $300 each to attend her bridal shower. Many agreed that the request was unreasonable – but such experiences are not uncommon. With this in mind, we want to hear your bridesmaid confessions: has being a bridesmaid ever cost you a small fortune? Or have you had to deal with a bride making other outlandish requests? Tell us about it (anonymously) below.

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9th July 2024 13:53
The Guardian
Tell us: have you experienced so-called ‘eyebrow blindness’?

If you’ve come to regret your past brow decisions, we would like to hear about it

Over the last couple of decades, brows have been big news the world of beauty – but shapes and styles have shifted dramatically. Now, TikTokkers are sharing throwback photos of what the internet has dubbed #eyebrowblindness – an apparent inability to see how terrible certain brow trends looked at the time.

Have you experienced so-called “eyebrow blindness”? Perhaps you over-plucked in the nineties, or opted for the super-heavy “slug” brows of the 2010’s? If you’ve come to regret your past brow decisions, we’d love to hear about it – and see your photos! – below.

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2nd July 2024 14:37