The Guardian
Three EU countries push for more defence investment and warn of ‘race against time’ – Europe live

Estonia, France and Poland issue call for ‘urgently’ increasing Europe’s defence readiness in new European Defence Industrial Strategy

Along with the new strategy, the Commission has proposed a European Defence Industry Programme to “bridge from short-term emergency measures, adopted in 2023 and ending in 2025, to a more structural and longer-term approach to achieve defence industrial readiness,” the Commission said in a statement.

The programme will mobilise €1.5 billion of the EU budget for 2025-2027.

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5th March 2024 14:01
The Guardian
Inside the Yellow Cocoon Shell review – jewel of slow cinema is a wondrous meditation on faith and death

Much is open-ended about this realist yet dreamlike exploration of midlife crisis and regret set in Vietnam

The question of what the title means, or what the movie means, remain open; even so, this is a quietly amazing feature debut from 34-year-old Thien An Pham, born in Vietnam and based in Houston, Texas. It’s a jewel of slow cinema set initially in Saigon and then the mountainous, lush central highlands far from the city; it is a zero-gravity epic quest, floating towards its strange narrative destiny and then maybe floating up over that to something else. It’s compassionate, intimate, spiritual and mysterious in ways that reminded me of Tsai Ming-liang or Edward Yang.

Inside the Yellow Cocoon Shell is presented in a calm, unforced realist style with many long, unbroken middle-distance shots, with closeups a rarity. There is a flashback and a dream-sequence presented in exactly the same way, leading to the woozy feeling that past and present, reality and reverie are all folding in on each other. The refusal of explicit emotion does not prevent one fiercely erotic kissing scene, or a moment where a young woman declares her adoration for Frank Capra’s It’s a Wonderful Life and wonders aloud: “Why can’t they make movies like that any more?” I can actually imagine Bob Rafelson making this film in 1972 (at half the length) with the same narrative structure, the same elements of midlife male crisis and regret.

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5th March 2024 14:00
The Guardian
Middle East crisis live: Hamas expected to stay in Cairo for more ceasefire talks with mediators

Leaders from Hamas expected to hold further talks with Egyptian and Qatari mediators over prospect of reaching ceasefire deal

The World Health Organization (WHO) has warned that malnutrition in northern Gaza is “particularly extreme”.

“The situation is particularly extreme in northern Gaza,” Richard Peeperkorn, WHO representative for Gaza and the West Bank, said.

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5th March 2024 13:54
The Guardian
Met commissioner hits back at handling of marches, saying police can’t be both ‘woke and fascists’ – UK politics live

Sir Mark Rowley responds to implicit criticism from Rishi Sunak about how police have handled pro-Palestinian marches, saying officers feel undermined

Sir Mark Rowley has hit back at Rishi Sunak’s criticism of the policing of anti-war protests, dismissing claims officers are failing to enforce the law as “inaccurate” and claiming officers were being branded as “woke and fascist” at the same time.

The Metropolitan police commissioner spoke out on Tuesday after police leaders were last week summoned to a summit at Downing Street.

We’re always operating in a very challenging political environments where tensions remain high and hate crime is still a long way above pre-October 7 levels.

Policing is used to being criticised. But where it isn’t justified, I do worry about the impact it has on our officers and staff, and on public confidence as we strive to operate without fear or favour.

In February, two separate YouGov polls showed that most Britons would prefer the government prioritise public spending over tax cuts …

A variation of that same question which more explicitly notes that the cuts would be on taxes that “everyday people pay” closes the gap considerably, with 41% supporting tax cuts in this scenario, although this is still lower than the 47% who would prefer to put money towards public services.

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5th March 2024 13:53
The Guardian
Matt Rempe is fighting the entire NHL. Will it boost or harm the league?

The ‘enforcer’ role had looked like it was slowly being eliminated from professional hockey. Then a hulking New York Rangers rookie emerged

Near the start of the third period on Saturday night in Toronto, it finally – and inevitably – happened. Leafs’ tough guy Ryan Reaves squared-off at centre ice with Matt Rempe, the hulking New York Rangers rookie. Rempe, a 6ft 7in, 240lbs centre, has one goal and one assist in his first seven games in the NHL. He also has 37 penalty minutes, five more than he’s spent actually playing on the ice. He’s what most people would call an “enforcer” – a role that in recent years has been more or less phased-out of the NHL. That’s not to say there aren’t guys around still who are willing to drop the gloves or play a more physical than finesse game – every team has at least one. But what Rempe is doing is different.

Rempe has, so far, spent most of his time fighting. This kind of thing hasn’t been seen in the NHL for years for a few reasons. For one, guys were dying. The off-ice deaths of enforcers Derek Boogaard, Wade Belak, and Rick Rypien within just months of each other in 2011 were a catalyst for change. In the years since, the case against the so-called “goon” has strengthened. Multiple studies have, for instance, linked fighting to CTE – even though the NHL commissioner, Gary Bettman, still disputes the link. But there was another change in hockey around the same time: analytics. In recent years, every player and prospect has become subject to intense data-based analysis, and teams search endlessly for quantifiable metrics – alongside human scouting reports – to chart a path to victory. An enforcer doesn’t easily fit within this new matrix. They rarely generate points and they typically don’t skate well or quickly enough, let alone create things like consistent successful zone entries.

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5th March 2024 13:35
The Guardian
Nothing Phone 2a review: a standout budget Android

Funky design, fun software, decent performance and long battery life provide a lot of phone for the money

London-based tech firm Nothing’s latest Android attempts to shake up the budget phone market with something a little more interesting.

Costing from £319 (€329/A$529) the Phone 2a aims to take the cool design and intrigue that made its higher-end models stand out and package it up into something cheaper but still novel, sits alongside the full-fat Phone 2 costing £579.

Screen: 6.7in 120Hz FHD+ OLED (394ppi)

Processor: MediaTek Dimensity 7200 Pro

RAM: 8 or 12GB

Storage: 128 or 256GB

Operating system: Nothing OS 2.5 (Android 14)

Camera: 50MP main and ultrawide, 32MP selfie

Connectivity: 5G, eSIM, wifi 6, NFC, Bluetooth 5.3 and GNSS

Water resistance: IP54 (splash resistant)

Dimensions: 162 x 76.3 x 8.9mm

Weight: 190g

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5th March 2024 13:30
The Guardian
Edward Bond: a phenomenal talent who upturned theatre with his explosive plays

One of the greatest dramatists of the 20th century, Bond – who has died aged 89 – confronted audiences with ‘the crisis in the human species’

Edward Bond, who has died aged 89, was a phenomenal dramatist who wrote more than 50 plays, many of which helped change the face of contemporary theatre. If, in his later years, he was more honoured abroad than in the UK, it was for a variety of reasons.

One was his own intransigence, which led him to fall out with many of the major theatrical institutions. Another was that his self-declared mission to confront audiences with “the crisis in the human species” found more willing hearers in France and Germany than at home. Yet he remains one of the great post-second world war dramatists.

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5th March 2024 13:03
The Guardian
Edward Bond, blazingly original British playwright, dies aged 89

Death announced of writer whose searing and controversial plays included Saved and Early Morning

Edward Bond, the theatrical firebrand who blew up his own career with his refusal to compromise his scorching poetic vision, died on Sunday aged 89. The death of the playwright, known for Saved, Lear and Bingo, was confirmed by the agency Casarotto Ramsay and Associates.

“I write of the rape of a corpse with a beer bottle to bring back some dignity to our theatre,” wrote Bond in a programme note to his 2016 play Dea, a retelling of Medea, which piled incest and necrophilia on to the myth’s more familiar crime of infanticide. Typical of his later career, its world premiere was not at a major institution, but at the embattled Secombe theatre, in the south London suburb of Sutton, which closed weeks later.

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5th March 2024 13:00
The Guardian
New Yorkers rail against luxury tower blocking Empire State Building: ‘The mighty dollar rules the sky’

Amid a nationwide housing crisis, residents say 262 Fifth Avenue – a batch of condos for the wealthiest – is ruining the view downtown

Tom Clark’s Lower East Side apartment comes with a prime view of the Empire State Building. “I can see it from my couch,” he said. Well, he used to be able to catch a glance – before an ultra-thin luxury tower dubbed 262 Fifth Avenue came along.

Now the 860ft residential tower, which is still under construction, blocks the Empire State Building from most vantage points south of 28th street. Many New Yorkers (and tourists) can no longer catch a glimpse of the celebrated landmark, all because of some poorly placed – and incredibly expensive – condos.

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5th March 2024 13:00
The Guardian
‘The internet is an alien life form’: how David Bowie created a market for digital music

Bowie’s 1999 album Hours… was the first to go on sale online before hitting regular stores – and his experimentation caused horror in the music industry

It is far from his best album, and not even his best album of the 1990s, but Hours... is David Bowie’s most significant album that decade. Not because of the music, however, but how it was released: the first album by a major artist on a major label to emerge as a download before it arrived physically.

Writing about the album in August 1999 ahead of its September release, Rolling Stone called Hours… a “cyber-coup”: a continuation of Bowie’s fascination with releasing music online, which he started with the Telling Lies single in 1996. He had also enthusiastically embraced webcasting and created his own internet service provider with BowieNet in 1998 “I couldn’t be more pleased to have the opportunity of moving the music industry closer to the process of making digital downloads available as the norm and not the exception,” is how Bowie explained the Hours… release at the time. “We are all aware that broadband opportunities are not yet available to the overwhelming majority of people, and therefore expect the success of this experiment to be measured in hundreds and not thousands of downloads. However, just as colour television broadcasts and film content on home video tapes were required first steps to cause their industries to expand consumer use, I am hopeful that this small step will lead to larger leaps by myself and others ultimately giving consumers greater choices and easier access to the music they enjoy.”

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5th March 2024 13:00
The Guardian
Death, abuse and torture: traffickers hold fleeing Rohingya to ransom for up to £3000 a time

People trapped in the world’s largest refugee camp hope to seek new lives elsewhere despite threats facing them as they attempt to leave Bangladesh

Even as dehydration was getting to their passengers, the traffickers using boats to carry hundreds of Rohingya away from refugee camps in Bangladesh thrust phones into their hands and demanded they ask their relatives for money.

It was only after 28-year-old Rehana Begum’s relatives had paid almost £2,000 to the traffickers that they agreed to continue their journey, but a few days later, still onboard the boat, she fell unconscious and later died from dehydration.

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5th March 2024 13:00
The Guardian
How much does Spotify really pay Apple?

Apple has been fined a whopping €1.8bn by the EU, but it still claims it’s done nothing wrong. Plus, what happens when open source software gets into the wrong hands of some crypto fans

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The tech industry is one of the most valuable sectors on the planet, but it ultimately rests on the unpaid labour of an alarmingly small amount of hobbyists.

That reliance is the blessing, and the curse, of open source software – coding projects put up on the internet for anyone to use, freely, in their own work. Some open source software solves simple problems elegantly enough that no one wants to redo the work unnecessarily; others tackle complex tasks that few have ever attempted.

the most consequential figures in the tech world are half guys like steve jobs and bill gates and half some guy named ronald who maintains a unix tool called ‘runk’ which stands for Ronald’s Universal Number Kounter and handles all math for every machine on earth

A project called tea.xyz promised people they could “get rewards for [their] open source contributions”, complete with a flashy website describing how it would “enhance the sustainability of open-source software”.

So far, it’s achieved the exact opposite. Promising to reward open source contributors with crypto tokens, the project asked users to verify their access to open source projects by merging in a YAML file containing their crypto wallet address.

The fine is nearly four times higher than expected in a move by the European Commission to show it will act decisively on tech companies who abuse their dominant position in the market for phones and online services.

The European competition commissioner, Margrethe Vestager, said a smaller fine would have been nothing more than the equivalent of “a parking fine” and was designed to act as “a deterrent” to such practices for Apple and others.

If a developer sells physical goods, serves ads in their app, or just shares an app for free, they don’t pay Apple anything.

When it comes to doing business, not everyone’s going to agree on the best deal. But it sure is hard to beat free. But free isn’t enough for Spotify.

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5th March 2024 12:50
The Guardian
It's the Christian Horner paradox: F1 is now hideously dull, but the drama has never been better | Marina Hyde

Who cares if the races lack competition – you can tune into the Red Bull boss’s personal life for the latest episode of Keeping Up With the Carkrashians

Episode two of the new season of Drive to Survive begins with an at-home scene of Father Christmas visiting Red Bull team principal Christian Horner’s house. It’s a charming vignette for the Netflix show – literally just Horner, his wife, Geri Halliwell, his two young children and a TV crew with at least two cameras so they can get both wide and cutaway shots. Those childhood opportunities to be part of father’s content farm are so precious, and Santa begins by asking the children: “Has Dad been good this year?” No, would now seem to be the answer.

Not to break out the journalese or anything, but the boss of Formula One’s entirely dominant team is currently embroiled in the headlines for all the wrong reasons, thanks to a mushrooming scandal that I have very little legal leeway in terms of being able to discuss fully here. It’s all very Keeping Up With the Carkrashians. Let’s just say that Horner was accused of controlling behaviour by a female Red Bull employee, was cleared last week by a resolutely opaque internal probe, only for a cache of messages said to be between the two to be leaked.

Marina Hyde is a Guardian columnist

Do you have an opinion on the issues raised in this article? If you would like to submit a response of up to 300 words by email to be considered for publication in our letters section, please click here.

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5th March 2024 12:39
The Guardian
Kentucky firefighter abseils off bridge to rescue dangling truck driver

Extraordinary footage shows Bryce Carden rescuing driver from stricken trailer hanging over Ohio River

The Kentucky firefighter who abseiled off a bridge to rescue the driver of a tractor-trailer as it dangled precariously over the Ohio River said he played only a small part in the successful rescue.

The Louisville firefighter Bryce Carden credited teamwork as he talked about the rescue on Good Morning America on Monday.

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5th March 2024 12:35
The Guardian
Moving the Goalposts | Feeding cattle to breaking barriers: Nepal goal machine Sabitra Bhandari

The 27-year-old has had to overcome obstacles to reach the French top flight with Guingamp. Now she wants change

On a bleak Monday in February, Sabitra Bhandari set off to warm up as soon as the coach made the sign. The clock was nearing the hour mark at the Stade Jean-Pierre Delhomme in the outskirts of Bordeaux and, just two days after signing for Guingamp, Bhandari was set to make history.

And so it happened. Samba, as she’s called by everyone back home, became the first Nepalese player – male or female – to play a European top-flight fixture, coming on in the 76th minute. It was a giant leap for the South Asian nation, whose direct footballing connection with Europe is limited to a few managerial tenures, youth trials, and reported interest in young footballers who ultimately do not make the move. “I always had that dream to play in Europe,” the 27-year-old tells Moving the Goalposts. “Now is the time to prove myself, put those dreams to reality by doing well at the level that I grew up watching.”

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5th March 2024 12:30
The Guardian
No equality for working women in any country in the world, study reveals

Global gender gap is far bigger than previously thought, as annual World Bank report takes childcare and safety issues into account for first time

No country in the world affords women the same opportunities as men in the workforce, according to a new report from the World Bank, which found the global gender gap was far wider than previously thought.

Closing the gap could raise global gross domestic product by more than 20%, said the report.

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5th March 2024 12:08
The Guardian
No 10 faces Tory backlash over plans to broaden extremism definition

Figures on right of party fear move could have unintended impact on those with socially conservative views

Downing Street is facing a backlash from Conservative MPs and peers over moves to create a broader of definition of extremism in response to what Rishi Sunak describes as the threat of “mob rule”.

Michael Gove, the communities secretary, is expected to unveil plans next week that would allow the government, universities and local authorities to cut off links to groups identified as “extremist”.

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5th March 2024 12:03
The Guardian
Trump’s apologists say it doesn’t matter if he’s guilty of insurrection. That’s not true | Mark Graber

Conservatives who used to rail against rulings that freed criminal suspects on technicalities now say the question of Trump’s guilt doesn’t affect whether he can be president

Donald Trump may be the only person about whom prominent conservatives think innocence is irrelevant. Voters in many states filed lawsuits arguing that Trump was constitutionally disqualified from the presidency, under section 3 of the 14th amendment, having committed treason against the United States when resisting by force the peaceful transfer of presidential power. The Colorado supreme court agreed. Trump and his lawyers responded by waving numerous constitutional technicalities that they claimed exempted traitors from constitutional disqualification, while barely making any effort to refute charges that the former president committed treason on 6 January 2021.

On Monday, all nine justices on the US supreme court agreed that Donald Trump should remain on the presidential ballot even if he is, in the words of Justices Sonia Sotomayor, Elena Kagan and Ketanji Brown Jackson, “an oathbreaking insurrectionist”. No one challenged that finding.

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5th March 2024 12:01
The Guardian
US supreme court ‘erred badly’ with Trump ruling, leading US historian says

Allan Lichtman, who has correctly predicted outcome of every US election since 1984, disagrees with decision on Colorado ballot

The US supreme court “erred badly” in ruling Colorado was wrong to seek to remove Donald Trump from the ballot for inciting the January 6 insurrection, a leading historian and analyst of presidential politics said.

The court handed down its unanimous ruling on Monday, a day before Colorado became one of 16 states and one US territory to hold a Super Tuesday primary.

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5th March 2024 12:00
The Guardian
I’ve spent decades loving a band you’ve probably never heard of. But there are 199 others who get it | Zoe Williams

Remember My Life Story? They managed to fill one of London’s most iconic venues on Saturday. So what if it’s also one of the smallest?

About a thousand years ago, I was really into a band called My Life Story. It was 1996: Britannia was about to be very cool and everything that happened in Camden was cool, even an inexpert piercing that immediately became infected, and they were good, goddammit. They were witty and splashy and knowing and pretentious, intensely melodic and defiantly unbothered by the impossibility of making any money if you went around with a 12-piece orchestra.

Looking back, they nearly made it a bunch of times – their debut album, Mornington Crescent, was No 2 in the indie chart in 1995, whatever the hell that meant, and they signed to Parlophone the year after, which is where all the hip cats were.

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5th March 2024 12:00
The Guardian
Worth its weight in gold: how to make a killing predicting the Oscars

The TV audience may be in decline, but a passionate community of amateurs has been monitoring every tremor of buzz long before the ceremony

Jason Turer has been an Oscars obsessive since he was a teenager. The first Academy Awards he watched was the controversial 1999 ceremony, when Shakespeare in Love took home the best picture gong over Saving Private Ryan; since 2001, he’s attempted to predict Oscar nominees and winners every year. For many Oscars fans, predictions often take the form of, say, an office sweep or game between friends; others might make a list in their notes app and check off correct predictions on the night.

But for the past 10 years, 36-year-old Turer has been predicting the Oscars competitively on the industry blog and fansite Gold Derby – an outlet for awards season fanatics to score points based on their predictions in a game that combines the frivolous glitz of the Oscars with the obsessive, stats-based fandom of fantasy football. He describes his experience of the site, where he counts as an “all-star user” because of his high success rate, as one of “friendly competition – we’re all having fun here,” before conceding: “One of my life goals is to correctly guess every single category one year.”

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5th March 2024 12:00
The Guardian
The Breakdown | Picking an England XV that can trouble Ireland in Six Nations clash

There is an England team capable of competing at Twickenham but Steve Borthwick needs to put it together

There are weeks when the art of selection becomes more about psychology than anything else. Put the data to one side for a second and consider the players the opposition would least fancy facing. How can you make your own team feel more optimistic and less weighed down by negativity? And, in doing so, send an extra frisson of excitement down the spines of your own fans when they see the team sheet?

So let’s huddle up tight and, ahead of the penultimate weekend of this Six Nations, consider what a down-at-heel England should do next. Their final two games are against Ireland and France and, even allowing for the problems in the French camp, the time has come to change the mood music at Twickenham. Simply sticking to what they have done so far is not going to be enough.

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5th March 2024 11:45
The Guardian
Roman Polanski tried in France for alleged defamation of British actor

Filmmaker held to account for dismissing claim of 1983 sexual assault against Charlotte Lewis as ‘heinous lie’

The French-Polish filmmaker Roman Polanski will be tried in France on Tuesday over allegations that he defamed a British actor who accused him of sexual abuse in the 1980s.

The 90-year-old is wanted in the US over the rape of a 13-year-old in 1977 and faces several other accusations of alleged sexual assault dating back decades and past the statute of limitations – all claims he has rejected.

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5th March 2024 11:41
The Guardian
Celebrity Big Brother launch review – does Sharon Osbourne even know what’s happening?

Osbourne joined the house with Louis Walsh and the Princess of Wales’ uncle – but have any of them really thought this through? It feels like the beginning of the end for TV’s most ridiculous reality show

It is 9.15pm and Louis Walsh and Sharon Osbourne – formerly of The X Factor fame – are standing in a colourful makeshift house on the outskirts of west London. “What are we doing?” whispers Louis as he grips Sharon’s shoulders, who has the frozen, bewildered look of someone who agreed to briefly appear on TV again for a princely sum without fully thinking it through. And then, the two of them are ushered into a hideaway in another section of the Celebrity Big Brother house, where they secretly watch people such as Love Island’s Ekin-Su and the Princess of Wales’ uncle clink champagne glasses and make small talk around a sofa.

It is a strange start to an undoubtedly strange show – not least because it’s 2024. This is the era of carefully managed TikTok accounts, of Notes app apologies and glossy scripted “reality” television and Instagram accounts awash with branded content for jade rollers and vitamin gummies. We’re not used to seeing celebs – and I use that word fairly loosely here – talk in their natural intonation, with all the awkward silent gaps and self-conscious expressions that can come from any candid real-life interaction. At one point, the camera cuts to Louis and Sharon again. “I just like nice simple food,” says Louis, shrugging. “I can make tea and I like takeaways.” Sharon nods stiffly. “I can do baked potatoes,” she says.

Big Brother is on ITV 1 and ITVX

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5th March 2024 11:25
The Guardian
Ukraine claims to have sunk Russian warship in occupied Crimea

Sinking of warship near Kerch strait would deal further blow to Moscow’s naval power and its control over Black Sea

Ukraine has sunk a Russian warship near the Kerch strait in occupied Crimea, it said, in a further blow to Moscow’s naval power and its control over the Black Sea despite Ukrainian losses elsewhere.

The HUR military intelligence agency in Kyiv said it attacked the Sergei Kotov on Monday night with naval drones. The vessel, which was on patrol, suffered damage to the stern, right and left sides, and then sank, the agency said.

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5th March 2024 11:03
The Guardian
Burnt-out and taken for granted: Britain’s workers need upside-down management | James Timpson

Record numbers are off sick, many others are on strike. But there is a way to turn the miserable business of working on its head

  • James Timpson is the CEO of Timpson

Looking around at the state of businesses in Britain, you’d be forgiven for thinking that the way we work now isn’t working. According to the Office for National Statistics, 2.8 million people in the UK are off work with long-term sickness – 700,000 more than before the pandemic. Employees at Deliveroo and Uber Eats are striking over pay and conditions. Teachers complain that the hours of unpaid overtime they are expected to work amount to “daylight robbery”. In February, the government responded to a huge trial of reduced working hours by 61 organisations by saying, “We have no plans to introduce a four-day working week,” regardless of how successful the pilot had been. It seems that, across sectors, many workers are feeling disrespected and burnt out, and neither bosses nor policymakers can imagine doing anything differently. But in my experience, work doesn’t have to be this way.

Timpson, the business I joined in 1995, is both successful and takes care of its employees. In fact, I’d argue that we are successful precisely because we take care of our employees. This year we will open 50 new shops, on high streets and in retail parks, recruiting an extra 160 colleagues. I believe that in any business, if you have a strong culture and keep investing in your colleagues, you can survive disruptive times.

James Timpson is the CEO of the five-generation, family-owned company Timpson and the author of The Happy Index: Lessons in Upside-Down Management

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5th March 2024 11:00
The Guardian
Long lunches, casual friendships, no one to worry about: solo holidays are brilliant for older women like me

I’ve been travelling alone for 15 years – and loving it. Now that others are catching up, here’s how to make the most of all that me time

It’s a midweek morning and I’ve just woken up in a hotel room in Madrid on the first day of a minibreak. The day stretches deliciously ahead: shall I go first to the Prado, or the Reina Sofía museum? Shall I have brunch and a late-afternoon main meal, or tapas here and there? The Gran Via is just up the street; I fancy a wander around the shops, but I’ll probably leave that till later in the day.

The fact is, I can do exactly what I want, when I want, because I’m holidaying alone. Like an increasing number of older women in the UK and across the world (I’m 61), I’ve discovered the huge benefits solo travel has to offer. It helps me to recharge my batteries, it’s empowering and it doesn’t have to be horribly expensive (I generally travel off-season and midweek). It takes me out of my comfort zone in just the right way, allowing me to have the experiences, the food and the fun that I want.

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5th March 2024 11:00
The Guardian
‘My period has become a nightmare’: life in Gaza without sanitary products

With limited access to pads, medicine and toilets – not to mention privacy – Palestinian women talk about the extreme difficulty of managing their periods during Israel’s assault

Mona, 17, used to manage intense period pain by making hot drinks, swaddling herself in blankets and knocking back painkillers. Now, sheltering in a crowded refuge in Rafah, she cannot even rely on getting hold of sanitary pads or access to a toilet.

She often vomits because of acute menstrual cramps, and has to manage that as well as bleeding, in a small house crammed with 45 displaced people where there is no privacy.

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5th March 2024 11:00
The Guardian
Painting the unpaintable: Gerhard Richter’s most divisive work returns to Auschwitz

The artist’s Birkenau cycle is based on the only pictures taken by prisoners at the Nazi death camp. As it goes on show next to its source, does it still have the power to shake us?

At the opening of a new exhibition hall in the Polish town of Oświęcim last week, a curious crowd of visitors seemed impressed with the purpose-built architectural structure: a minimalist, Aldo Rossi-like building that feels more like a tomb than a gallery. They initially remained more sceptical of the artworks inside, however. “Is it a painting or not?”, some people asked each other. “Take a closer look – can you make out what it’s made of?”

Obscurity is in the essence of German artist Gerhard Richter’s Birkenau cycle, arguably the single most important artwork by one of the most influential artists alive today. It is hard to look beyond the surface of these four 260 x 200cm pictures, which the artist covered with thick layers of paint that were then scratched off, reapplied and scratched off again multiple times with a squeegee, before veiling them in black, grey, green and red. You can stand in front of them for hours before you start to make out the more figurative paintings underneath the abstraction, depicting several naked bodies, some of them lifeless.

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5th March 2024 11:00
The Guardian
What led to the Haiti jailbreak – and can democracy be restored?

A state of emergency has been declared after gangs stormed two prisons and freed thousands of inmates. What will it take to restore order?

  • This article is an extract from our First Edition newsletter. Sign up here

On Sunday, after criminal gangs stormed Haiti’s two biggest jails and freed more than 3,800 criminals, the government declared a 72-hour state of emergency and a night curfew. But with gangs now exerting de facto authority over about 80% of the capital, and senior figures including the prime minister and acting president, Ariel Henry, out of the country, the government’s future appears increasingly uncertain.

In theory, Haiti’s path back from anarchy lies with an international UN-backed security force, led by 1,000 Kenyan police officers, to bring the gangs to heel – but the prospect of their arrival has led to a non-aggression pact between the warring gangs, and a declaration that they will seek to capture the police chief and government ministers.

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5th March 2024 10:34
The Guardian
‘This is still taboo’: queer teens and their families embrace gay comedy in Serbia

Audiences are finding sharp resonance and emotional comfort in Patrik Lazić’s moving and funny play Our Son, about topics still sensitive in the Balkans

The hurling of a salad bowl to the floor might not sound like the most dramatic of moments, but it sent a ripple of recognition through the audience at the National theatre in Pirot, south-eastern Serbia, on a mid-February evening.

The salad bowl incident took place midway through Our Son, a moving and funny play by Patrik Lazić, a young writer and director from Pula in Croatia, about the relationship between a young gay man (Amar Ćorović) and his parents (Dragana Varagić and Aleksandar Đinđić). The play takes place over the course of an emotionally fraught family dinner, in which it is very apparent the young man’s parents are still struggling to come to terms with his sexuality. They continually blame each other and themselves. Eventually things spill over. Tears are shed. Salad bowls are upended.

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5th March 2024 10:24
The Guardian
Financial toll of climate crisis hitting women harder, UN says

Rural households led by women lose about 8% more income to heat stress than male-led families, data shows

Women in rural areas suffer substantially greater economic losses from the impacts of climate breakdown than men in developing countries, research has shown, and the gap is likely to widen further.

Households headed by women in rural areas lost about 8% more of their income to heat stress than male-headed households, and their reduction in income when floods struck was about 3% greater than the loss to men, according to data released by the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) on Tuesday.

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5th March 2024 10:00
The Guardian
‘The Bene Gesserit can kill with their voices. That’s what I try to do’: the musicians mining Dune for tunes

Iron Maiden, Fatboy Slim and Grimes have all made music inspired by Frank Herbert’s 1960s sci-fi epic. So what makes ‘Dunecore’ different to other interpretive genres?

Harry Potter might have “wrock” (AKA “wizard rock”), Doctor Who fans “trock” (“Time Lord rock”) and Star Wars “jizz” (don’t ask) but you could argue that few works of sci-fi or fantasy have influenced the history of popular music as much as Dune. Since the novel’s release in 1965, countless huge artists, from Iron Maiden to Grimes, have released songs or entire records inspired by Frank Herbert’s epic tale of war, colonialism and human morality. Although the book is particularly beloved fodder for 70s and 80s prog musicians, its influence has leached into everything from underground pop to Fatboy Slim’s No 2-charting 2001 hit Weapon of Choice, with successive generations finding new ways to reinterpret Herbert’s images of monstrous sandworms, blue-eyed freedom fighters and superhuman nuns through music.

Iron Maiden’s Steve Harris first read Dune when he was in his early teens. Despite thinking “it was a bit odd going for the first 20 pages”, because of Herbert’s unusual terminology, he ended up loving the series and reading a number of its sequels. Over a decade after reading the first novel, Harris incorporated the language of Dune into one of his songs, ending Iron Maiden’s 1983 album Piece of Mind with a churning epic inspired by the series’ messianic protagonist Paul Atreides: “He is the Kwizatz Haderach / He is born of Caladan / And will take the Gom Jabbar.”

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5th March 2024 09:10
The Guardian
Riaz Phillips’ recipe for mackerel and beans with lime and pepper sauce

Make a jar of this killer lime and pepper sauce, and it will keep for months, on hand and ready to perk up all sorts, including this super-simple mackerel with baked beans

For many in the Caribbean, hot sauce is part of everyday life. While locals in Trinidad and Tobago and Guyana are hardened to the punch of scorpion, wiri wiri or scotch bonnet peppers, I have more than once made the mistake of drizzling chilli-based condiments a little too liberally on my food. The citrus in my lime and pepper sauce offsets the intensity of the chilli, making it more palatable for the hot sauce-averse yet still delicious for existing fans. It goes really well with this Caribbean play on beans on toast.

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5th March 2024 09:00
The Guardian
To everyone’s surprise, F1’s schlocky personal soap opera has become reality | Jonathan Liew

Christian Horner lived by the scripted entertainment product, and his tenure may die by the scripted entertainment product

Sad times. Maybe even end times. The vultures are circling. The barbarians are at the gate and everything that was once sacred is being made profane. Mohammed ben Sulayem, the president of the FIA, believes recent controversies are beginning to damage the sport. Toto Wolff, the team principal of Mercedes, identifies “a problem for the whole of Formula One”. The global head of Ford Performance Motorsport has reminded Red Bull of the “very high standards of behaviour and integrity” that will be expected of their future engine partner. Who else, in this moment of turmoil and tumult, will stand up for the impeccable good name and sound values of the sport Christian Horner described only last year as “the Kardashians on wheels”?

Certainly it has been vaguely amusing over the last few weeks to behold some of the moral squeamishness and knotted indignation generated within the paddock by the Horner affair. The apparent surprise that a product packaged and sold as a schlocky personal soap opera has somehow degenerated into a schlocky personal soap opera. The sheer disbelief that a sport owned and run by rich, unaccountable men and held in some of the world’s most repressive dictatorships might occasionally be lacking in transparency. The belated discovery that there might actually be such a thing as bad publicity, negative publicity, the kind of publicity that does not emerge fully formed from the editing suite, complete with pumping soundtrack and pre-written storylines.

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5th March 2024 09:00
The Guardian
Super Tuesday: Trump all but certain of Republican nomination as 16 states vote

Primary contests represent last chance for Nikki Haley to deny Trump, while Biden glides towards being Democratic nominee

Donald Trump’s grip on the Republican nomination for president is all but certain to be confirmed on Tuesday, as 16 US states and one territory hold primary votes. From Alabama to Alaska and from Arkansas to American Samoa, “Super Tuesday” represents Nikki Haley’s last chance to deny Trump a third nomination.

But the former South Carolina governor and United Nations ambassador is way off the pace, her only win in Washington DC, and in need of a political miracle if she is not to be forced to finally end her campaign.

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5th March 2024 09:00
The Guardian
Piste off! Skiers fear new lift will threaten La Grave’s old school charm

Proposals to build a cable car to access the retreating glacier have sparked a debate about the future of this low-key resort loved by ski tourers

There’s nothing like scrambling along a jagged granite ridge resplendent in russet and lime-green lichen, when it should be covered in snow, to remind you that the climate crisis is in full swing. My guide, Maxant Danilo, and I are at an altitude of more than 2,500 metres in the Hautes-Alpes, but even though it’s late January, conditions on south-facing slopes such as these feel more like late spring. Our snowboards are strapped to our backpacks instead of our feet.

Danilo, who works for a guide collective based in nearby La Grave, tells me the resort actually had one of the strongest starts to a winter season in recent years, with plenty of snow and low temperatures from November until the middle of January. The problem is, the constant mild weather since has melted much of the snowpack.

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5th March 2024 08:00
The Guardian
Artists, children, sex workers: Christer Strömholm’s sympathetic street scenes – in pictures

The influential photographer befriended the transgender people he shot in Paris – and found common ground with famed sculptors and young people in poverty

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5th March 2024 08:00
The Guardian
Nato is growing reckless over Ukraine – and Russia’s German military leak proves it | Simon Jenkins

An intercepted meeting on sending Taurus missiles to Ukraine suggests the west is on the brink of a risky and futile escalation

The German armed forces are mad. The leaking by Moscow of a 38-minute discussion between the head of the Luftwaffe and senior officers on sending Taurus cruise missiles to Ukraine suggests that Nato’s will not to escalate the current war is weakening. The meeting, reportedly held on an unencrypted line, had all the secrecy of a teenage groupchat. It boosted Vladimir Putin’s claim that this is a war of the west against Russia, with Ukraine as mere proxy.

The west’s justified objective in Ukraine was to help foil Putin’s attempt to topple Kyiv’s elected government. This was achieved in a matter of months, thanks to the Ukrainian army, with western logistical support. At no point did Nato risk that timeworn precursor of so many past European wars, the reckless escalation of a local conflict into a continent-wide one.

Simon Jenkins is a Guardian columnist

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5th March 2024 08:00
The Guardian
Australia urges Israel to provide evidence for allegations UNRWA staff were involved in 7 October attacks

UN ambassador says Australia also wants details of UNRWA reform before humanitarian funding is restored

Israel should “cooperate fully with UN investigators” and “provide all available evidence” for its allegations that United Nations staff were involved in the 7 October terrorist attacks, Australia’s ambassador has urged, saying the government wants to resume funding to the agency providing aid in Gaza.

The overnight intervention at the UN comes as the prime minister, Anthony Albanese, shrugged off an Australian law firm’s request for the international criminal court to consider investigating him for alleged complicity to genocide over Israel’s actions in Gaza. Albanese claimed the request from Birchgrove Legal “has no credibility”, dismissing its calls to probe government actions including pausing funding to UNRWA.

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5th March 2024 07:23
The Guardian
What makes today’s teens so pessimistic about the future? Perhaps it’s the present | Gaby Hinsliff

Rishi Sunak wants to convince children that the system is not rigged against them – but he’s arguing against the reality of their own lives

Youth is fearless. Or, it’s meant to be, anyway. Half the point of being young is to feel invincible, not ground down like your boring old parents: to be convinced you’re going to do things differently and better. Yet more than half of British teenagers think they won’t be as well off by the age of 30 as their parents were, according to a survey of 14- to 17-year-olds by the children’s charity Barnardo’s.

This ought to set off alarm bells. It both confirms something we’ve long known – that it’s getting harder for young people to tick what were once considered the boxes of successful adulthood, such as being able to buy a home – but also highlights something less frequently discussed, which is the emotional impact on children of watching their own parents struggle to get by, no matter how hard they try.

Gaby Hinsliff is a Guardian columnist

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5th March 2024 07:00
The Guardian
‘It doesn’t feel special’: is Soho House a victim of its own success?

Chain of private members’ clubs under pressure as it reports full-year results this week, with some claiming rapid expansion has robbed it of its exclusivity

There is a Soho House meme account on Instagram with 128,000 followers. Among its recent posts are ones lampooning the exclusive private members’ club for supposed frat boy behaviour and a video with the caption: “Love it when £200 leaves my bank account then I’m told to wait four hours for a table at 3pm.”

It has hit a nerve with some members and investors worldwide. “It’s like this every time, every time I come,” says Zach, an “every house” member, which means he can access all of the 42 houses across the world for £2,920 a year. “You can never get a table, it takes ages to get served, and you’re paying a lot for the privilege of being a member. I don’t really know what the point is any more. It doesn’t feel special, I don’t feel special.”

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5th March 2024 07:00
The Guardian
China sets challenging GDP target in face of regional tensions and ageing population

Economists say 5% target is ambitious, as premier Li Qiang tells annual gathering that global economy and problems at home are presenting hurdles to recovery

China has set its target for GDP growth at 5%, in line with analysts’ expectations for another year of historically modest ambitions for the economy, amid regional tensions and its demographic crisis.

China’s premier, Li Qiang, spoke of the “challenges” facing China’s leaders as he delivered his annual government work report on Tuesday. He cited the global economy and regional tensions as hurdles for China’s recovery, as well as domestic issues such as low consumer demand in a challenging labour market.

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5th March 2024 06:09
The Guardian
From £35 crystals to £30,000 diamonds: the jaw-dropping rise of tooth jewellery

More and more Britons are putting their money where their mouth is, whether it’s in the form of Swarovski crystals or ‘grills’ made with gems and precious metals. What’s the appeal – and what are the dangers?

It’s Imogen Campbell’s first time having tooth gems, although she booked the appointment twice. She got cold feet ahead of the first one, worried what her employers might think. “I was a bit hesitant, because I work in financial services,” says the 25-year-old.

“It’s very old-school, you know, people wearing suits and stuff to work. Obviously, I’m kind of like this …” she says, gesturing at her baggy trousers and padded jacket. Campbell is now feeling braver, and is here at a tooth-gem studio in east London armed with sketches of her dream dental designs.

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5th March 2024 06:01
The Guardian
UK spends least among major European economies on low-carbon energy policy, study shows

Britain spent about £26bn in three years on low-carbon measures, less than Italy, Germany, France and Spain, Greenpeace finds

The UK spends less on low-carbon energy policy than any other major European economy, analysis has shown, despite evidence that such spending could lower household bills and increase economic growth more than the tax cuts the government has planned.

Spending on low-carbon measures for the three years from April 2020 to the end of April 2023 was about $33.3bn (£26.2bn) in total for the UK, the lowest out of the top five European economies, according to an analysis by Greenpeace of data from the International Energy Agency.

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5th March 2024 06:01
The Guardian
‘If we can’t fish any more, we’re going to die’: the volunteer sea patrols protecting precious Philippine waters

Dedicated groups called Bantay Dagat aim to conserve the abundant marine life surrounding their thousands of islands, which has been under pressure for years from intensive overfishing

  • Photographs by Marla Tomorug/Edges of Earth

It is midnight on a beach in southern Negros Oriental, a province in the central Philippines, and everything is dark and silent. Except, that is, for the scene playing out in front of a small guardhouse made of bamboo. There, seven people have congregated: one middle-aged man is splayed on a bench, a man and a woman in sports vests hug their knees to their chest while chatting, and others walk back and forth barefoot with torches and green laser pointers shining out beyond the sand. All eyes are set on a portion of the ocean loosely cordoned off by some white buoys.

These are the Bantay Dagat, the sea patrol, a team of village-appointed volunteers who take turns staying up all night to guard their waters. They fend off any local people trying to illegally fish in the community marine sanctuaries, and any commercial fishers trying to trespass into municipal waters within 15km (nine miles) of the coastline.

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5th March 2024 06:00
The Guardian
‘It was so wrong’: why were so many people imprisoned over one protest in Bristol?

More people have been imprisoned for rioting during a single day in Bristol in 2021 than in any other protest-related disorder since at least the 1980s. What was behind this push to prosecute so harshly?

On the afternoon of 21 March 2021, Fleur Moody hurried through the graffiti-sprayed backstreets of Bristol. She and her partner were on their way to join a march against proposed laws that would give the police extensive new powers to clamp down on protests. They caught up with the march just before it streamed into a park overlooking the city’s harbour.

Moody, who was 26 at the time, was getting her life back on track after years of mental health problems and addiction. She sat on the grass with friends sharing food and drinks in the last of the sunshine. “I was quite fragile,” she told me recently. “But I’ve always believed people have a right to protest and have their voices heard.”

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5th March 2024 06:00
The Guardian
Taylor Swift: Singapore prime minister defends deal to secure exclusive access to Eras tour

Prime minister Lee Hsien Loong confirmed an ‘arrangement’ for Singapore to be the only stop on Swift’s south-east Asia Eras tour

Singapore prime minister Lee Hsien Loong has defended an incentive provided to Taylor Swift by his government, to make the country the only stop in south-east Asia on her world tour, saying it was not a hostile act towards its neighbours.

“[Our] agencies negotiated an arrangement with her to come to Singapore and perform and to make Singapore her only stop in south-east Asia,” Lee told a press conference in Melbourne, where he is attending a regional summit.

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5th March 2024 05:53
The Guardian
Why IVF is under attack in Alabama | podcast

After an Alabama supreme court judgment, the biggest IVF clinics in the state closed, leaving prospective parents desperate. Jessica Glenza reports

When Gabrielle Goidel and her husband turned to fertility treatment they had already endured the grief and pain of three miscarriages. The couple, who had recently moved from Texas to Alabama, turned to IVF. It was stressful, uncomfortable and very expensive but they were determined to start a family. But just when Gabriele’s treatment had progressed to the stage where her eggs were about to be retrieved they hit an unexpected hurdle.

In February, Alabama’s Supreme Court made a ruling in a case in which embryos in an IVF clinic were accidentally destroyed. In their judgements, they classified the embryos as “extra uterine children”. That decision had the potential to change everything about the use of IVF in the state. If embryos were children, with the same rights, what would that mean for the storage and transportation of embryos? What about embryos that are discarded, either because a previous embryo has already been implanted in the patient, or because they are not viable?

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5th March 2024 04:00
The Guardian
Should other clubs chase Wrexham’s American success story?

The club owned by Ryan Reynolds and Rob McElhenney is leading the push to bring free-to-air EFL matches to the US

Every sport today, from cricket to padel, wants to crack America. Soccer is already a major cultural force across the US, but its incursion into the American sporting psyche has been led by MLS and the top leagues of Europe, the English Premier League in particular. If you’re a club battling away in the English Football League Two, how exactly do you stand out to the median US soccer fan? What place does a midweek cup fixture between Accrington Stanley and the Fulham Under-21s have in a footballing world of volcanically hyped top-flight matchups and potential super leagues?

One solution for a lower league club fighting for international attention might be to get bought by Hollywood celebrities and launch a slickly produced, multi-season documentary about the club’s quest for promotion through the lower tiers of British football on a popular US cable network. That, of course, is the solution that Wrexham famously devised to build its following among the American public, with the third season of Welcome to Wrexham set to premiere in the US on 18 April. Now the Welsh club, owned by actors Ryan Reynolds and Rob McElhenney and currently sitting third in League Two, wants to build on its recent successes to help all 72 clubs across the three tiers of the English Football League gain a foothold in the American market.

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5th March 2024 01:00
The Guardian
‘It seems crazy’: Josh Kerr unhappy with world indoor athletics prize money

  • 3,000m world indoor champion wants to see fresh investment
  • Gold medallists at championships in Glasgow earned $40,000

Josh Kerr has hit out at the lack of money in track and field, calling the $40,000 (£31,500) on offer to gold medallists at the World ­Athletics Indoor Championships “crazy” ­compared to other sports, and urged fresh investment – whether it is from Saudi Arabia or elsewhere.

The 26-year-old, who won the world 3,000m indoor title with a storming performance on Saturday, also made it clear he backed Michael Johnson’s recently announced plans to set up a new US-funded athletics league in 2025. Johnson, a four-time Olympic gold ­medallist, is said to have already raised ­millions in an attempt to revolutionise the sport with a TV-friendly team-based ­format, and last week joined forces with global sports marketing firm, Winners Alliance.

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4th March 2024 23:30
The Guardian
Broncos take $85m hit to bring Russell Wilson’s Denver career to an early end

  • Quarterback’s career in Denver was brief and unsuccessful
  • Wilson signed five-year, $242.6m extension in 2022

The Broncos have brought an early end to Russell Wilson’s expensive and unsuccessful time in Denver by announcing they will cut the quarterback from their roster.

“We spoke with Russell Wilson today to inform him of his release after the start of the league year [which starts next Wednesday],” Broncos general manager George Paton and coach Sean Payton said in a joint statement.

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4th March 2024 23:10
The Guardian
Haiti’s weekend of violence puts government future in doubt

Armed gangs attack international airport and free over 3,800 prisoners in seemingly coordinated effort to oust Ariel Henry

The future of Haiti’s government appeared increasingly uncertain on Monday, after armed gangs attacked the country’s international airport and freed more than 3,800 prisoners this weekend in what appears to be a coordinated effort to topple the prime minister, Ariel Henry.

Haitian officials declared a three-day state of emergency and imposed a nightly curfew in an effort to calm the growing unrest but national police are outgunned, and senior officials – including Henry, who is also acting president – are outside the country.

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4th March 2024 20:12
The Guardian
How significant is Russia’s apparent interception of military talks on Ukraine?

Key questions answered after extraordinary leak of secret call involving Germany’s air force chief

An extraordinary leak of an online call involving Germany’s air force chief and three subordinates emerged on Friday, in which they discussed whether it might be possible to persuade a reluctant chancellor to approve giving the long-range Taurus missile to Ukraine, and whether the munition could blow up the strategic Kerch Bridge that connects Russia to occupied Crimea.

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4th March 2024 20:07
The Guardian
France makes abortion a constitutional right in historic Versailles vote

Eiffel Tower lit up to mark change, seen as way of protecting law that decriminalised abortion in 1975

The French parliament has enshrined abortion as a constitutional right at a historic joint session at the Palace of Versailles.

Out of 925 MPs and senators eligible to vote, 780 supported the amendment, which will give women the “guaranteed freedom” to choose an abortion.

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4th March 2024 19:10
The Guardian
‘They kind of don’t care’: even before court decision, Colorado primary voters showed up for Trump

The Guardian speaks to two experts on state politics about how, if at all, the supreme court case affected voters and election workers

For weeks, an air of uncertainty hung over Colorado voters as they marked their ballots in the state’s presidential primaries.

Colorado is at the centre of perhaps the most dramatic, high-stakes legal disputes that the US supreme court has seen in the past century. On Monday, the nation’s highest court overturneda Colorado ruling that disqualified Donald Trump from the state’s ballot under the 14th amendment to the US constitution, for inciting an insurrection.

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4th March 2024 19:09
The Guardian
Jack Teixeira agrees to prison sentence of 16 years over Pentagon leaks – report

Massachusetts air national guard member who allegedly leaked Ukraine military secrets on Discord agrees to plead guilty

Jack Teixeira, the 22-year-old charged with leaking classified US military documents to fellow gamers on a social media platform, agreed on Monday to accept a prison sentence of 16 years.

Teixeira, a member of the Massachusetts air national guard, agreed to plead guilty to all six counts charging him with willful retention and transmission of national defense information, ABC News reported, citing a signed court filing.

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4th March 2024 17:47
The Guardian
Stella McCartney celebrates Mother Earth with no lack of glamour

Designer laments the state we’re in but at Paris show says ‘the clothes should never be compromised’

Michael Jackson’s daughter between two Beatles on the front row, and a Spice Girl backstage with Charlotte Rampling. David Byrne on the mood board and an apple-leather mock-croc vegan trenchcoat with a sparkling mesh swimsuit made from recycled aluminium sequins on the runway. Kate Moss’s daughter catwalking in a turquoise minidress of responsibly sourced alpaca to a soundtrack of an environmental manifesto voiced by Olivia Colman and Helen Mirren. It can only be the Stella McCartney show.

“Well, I mean, we’re in a bit of a state here, aren’t we?” said McCartney of the slogan vest that read “About Fucking Time”. “I always want the platform of Stella McCartney to have an environmental message. I am here to remind people that this is one of the most harmful industries. But I’m not here to make people depressed and scared. I want to celebrate Mother Earth and all of her creatures and to remind us all to be conscious of that, but at the same time, I want it to be an uplifting experience.”

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4th March 2024 16:24
The Guardian
Huge blizzard hits California and Nevada – in pictures

A powerful blizzard struck California and Nevada at the weekend, with snowfall of up to 3 metres expected in some higher areas. A stretch of Interstate 80 remains shut in both directions. Even as blizzards eased, more winter storms are expected for much of the region on Monday and Tuesday, the National Weather Service said

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4th March 2024 14:30
The Guardian
A US civil rights march and an erupting volcano: photos of the day – Monday

The Guardian’s picture editors select some of the most powerful photos from around the world

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4th March 2024 14:20
The Guardian
Is Phil Foden the best player in the Premier League right now? - Football Weekly

Max Rushden is joined by Barry Glendenning, Jonathan Wilson and Troy Townsend as Manchester City win the Manchester derby

Rate, review, share on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud, Acast and Stitcher, and join the conversation on Facebook, Twitter and email.

On the podcast today; Manchester City win the derby - was it inevitable? Is Phil Foden the best player in the Premier League right now and what do we make of Marcus Rashford’s performance?

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4th March 2024 14:20
The Guardian
Rachel Roddy’s recipe for cauliflower, potato and mint fritters | A kitchen in Rome

These sprightly, mint-infused fritters are great straight from the pan, but taste even funkier after a rest of 20 minutes or so


Walking home the other afternoon, I passed a car with a weed growing around one of its tyres. I found myself stopping, so I looked to see where the weed started and where it ended – it went almost all the way around it, like a snow chain.

It was only when I was right down near the tyre, surrounded by the smell of weed and rubber, that I realised I had done exactly the same thing during the first lockdown. Not with the same car, but one similar – which, like so many cars in so many cities, sat in the same spot for so long that the weeds took over and started using it as a climbing frame. For two odd, vertiginous seconds, it was lockdown again. Then I found the start of the weed in the crack where the pavement met the road, along with a cigarette butt and a damp lottery ticket, rotting leaves and other weeds, including a tuft of mentuccia.

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4th March 2024 12:00
The Guardian
Fury after Exxon chief says public to blame for climate failures

Darren Woods tells Fortune consumers not willing to pay for clean-energy transition, prompting backlash from climate experts

The world is off track to meet its climate goals and the public is to blame, Darren Woods, chief executive of oil giant ExxonMobil, has claimed – prompting a backlash from climate experts.

As the world’s largest investor-owned oil company, Exxon is among the top contributors to global planet-heating greenhouse gas emissions. But in an interview, published on Tuesday, Woods argued that big oil is not primarily responsible for the climate crisis.

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4th March 2024 12:00
The Guardian
John Kerry: US committed to tackling climate crisis despite fossil fuel growth

Outgoing climate chief says he is ‘not ready’ to give up on 1.5C target he helped negotiate in Paris agreement

The US continues to be a force for good in tackling the climate crisis, despite its soaring fossil fuel production, the John Kerry has insisted.

The outgoing US climate chief acknowledged, however, that strong safeguards were needed to dismantle oil and gas infrastructure before the switch to renewables could become permanent, as he prepared to leave his post as special presidential envoy.

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4th March 2024 11:00
The Guardian
‘If the sea rises we’ll have to leave’: plans to restart gas drilling threaten Italy’s sinking delta

Sixty years after fatal floods and subsidence halted gas extraction in the Po delta region, politicians are once again eyeing methane reserves. But at what cost to one of the Mediterranean’s largest wetlands and the people who live there?

To a visitor driving through Polesine in north-east Italy on a winter morning, the area might seem blessed with an abundance of wildlife. The biodiversity is among the richest in Italy, with 400 species of bird, lagoons, marshes and reed beds that have created a true natural labyrinth. Yet, it soon becomes obvious that something is not right: houses and fields are all lower than the road, visibly sunken, protected by embankments about four metres high. The reason? Without those barriers, they would be under water.

The entire area of Polesine, a strip of land between the Po delta and the Adriatic Sea, has long suffered the consequences of subsidence, but it was aggravated by gas extraction, which is why the practice was banned by the government in 1961.

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4th March 2024 10:00
The Guardian
Life at Norway’s remote arctic fox breeding station – in pictures

As part of the state-sponsored programme to restore arctic fox populations, Norway has been feeding the animals for nearly 20 years, helping boost numbers from as few as 40 in Norway, Finland, and Sweden, to about 550 across Scandinavia today. ‘Without these conservation measures, the arctic fox would surely have become extinct in Norway,’ said Bjørn Rangbru, a senior adviser on threatened species with the country’s environment agency

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4th March 2024 08:10
The Guardian
‘Every girl in Iran is born into a cage’: exiled Kurdish women fighting for freedom in Iraq

Kurdish women living in Iran face discrimination for their ethnicity as well as their gender. The photographer Keiwan Fatehi spoke to those who were forced to leave their homeland due to oppression, lack of rights or fear for their safety and joined the peshmerga military

Fatehi is an Iranian Kurdish photographer based in Iraq. These images are part of his Gender and national apartheid series with Middle East Images

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4th March 2024 08:00
The Guardian
Sexism in the City: ‘No matter how hard I work, they will never ever recognise me’

Exclusive: Witnesses to UK parliament’s inquiry share their stories from the world of finance

When City executive Selena* logged on for a Teams call with five senior male colleagues in spring 2021, she was gobsmacked.

She had spent weeks warning bosses that the London-based investment firm risked falling foul of European regulations. She had gathered data and presented supporting evidence, but was repeatedly brushed off. “Nobody wanted to listen,” she said.

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4th March 2024 07:00
The Guardian
‘Musk needs to be adored … Zuckerberg is out of his depth’: Kara Swisher on the toxic giants of Big Tech

The journalist and podcaster has been scrutinising Silicon Valley for decades, knows all the big players – and once believed that tech could save the world. But that was before greed and ego got in the way

“This is about love gone wrong,” says Kara Swisher, looking back on a life spent studying the giants of Big Tech. “I saw the possibilities of tech being the saviour of humanity – or at the very least, really helping people, in terms of community and knowledge and education. And instead, you know …”

She pauses, and wearily exhales. “It’s like that old expression: ‘They promised us jetpacks, and this is what we got?’ Like, are you kidding me?” But, she adds: “The problem isn’t tech. It’s people.”

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4th March 2024 06:00
The Guardian
What the unrest in Leicester revealed about Britain – and Modi’s India – podcast

A year and a half ago, Hindus and Muslims clashed in the streets of one of Britain’s most diverse cities. What lay behind the violence? By Yohann Koshy

Archive: The Guardian

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4th March 2024 06:00
The Guardian
Is ill-health holding back the UK economy? - podcast

Growing numbers of people are leaving the jobs market because of long-term illnesses. It’s coming at a huge personal and national cost, says economics editor Larry Elliott

New figures from the Office for National Statistics suggest there are 2.8 million people classified as not looking for work because of health issues – up from the 2.6 million previously estimated and a one-third increase on the 2.1 million before the Covid-19 pandemic.

As the Guardian’s economics editor, Larry Elliott, tells Hannah Moore, this is a shocking rise and each of those people will have individual and often complex circumstances. There is no easy fix. But it is a situation that has not appeared out of nowhere: while the Covid pandemic has clearly had a huge effect on physical and mental health, many of the underlying trends have been clear for decades. And NHS waiting lists have tripled in length since the Conservatives took over in 2010.

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4th March 2024 04:00
The Guardian
Ski resorts’ era of plentiful snow may be over due to climate crisis, study finds

US ski industry is losing billions as average season has become five to seven days shorter in past half century

If you have been enjoying lushly covered mountains by skiing or snowboarding this winter then such an experience could soon become a receding memory, with a new study finding that an era of reliably bountiful snow has already passed due to the climate crisis.

The US ski industry has lost more than $5bn over the past two decades due to human-caused global heating, the new research has calculated, due to the increasingly sparse nature of snowfall on mountain ranges. Previous studies have shown that in many locations precipitation is now coming in the form of rain, rather than snow, due to warming temperatures.

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2nd March 2024 14:30
The Guardian
Human or fake? How AI is distorting beauty standards – video

Images created by AI are getting exponentially better, to the point where many people are unable to distinguish them from the real thing. As this technology continues to develop, challenges to our perception of what is real are immense, and our trust in what we are seeing is eroded. Fakes are already changing industries such as modelling and marketing, but can they offer a more diverse reflection of humanity than has historically been available – or are they destined to reflect the narrow standards of beauty these industries have long been drawn to?

*With thanks to the Centre de Cultura Contemporània de Barcelona

*Great British Brands is published by Country & Town House magazine 

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27th February 2024 11:42
The Guardian
Tell us: share your experience of working out as a family

Whether you go to the gym with siblings or run with your parents, we would like to hear from you

Are you a family that works out together? Perhaps you go on runs with your kids. Or you’ve set up a home gym and do group sessions with your teenagers. Or you play an intergenerational game of padel tennis or football every week.

If you exercise with other family members, we would love to hear from you for a magazine feature.

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21st February 2024 14:16
The Guardian
Ukrainian Factory: two years of war for a Mykolaiv key worker

The film offers a poignant glimpse into the life of Vitalii Velychurov, a key worker in the main bread factory of Mykolaiv, once a frontline city. Russian troops destroyed Mykolaiv's major infrastructure and most of the city's residents have left – including Vitalii's wife and children – but the factory has delivered bread to the besieged population every day since the full scale invasion broke out. Lost in memories of the past and an uncertain future, Vitalii finds solace in the continued rhythm of the factory

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21st February 2024 11:43
The Guardian
US men and dating: share your experience

We would like to find out more about the experience of dating for men in the US

Dating is hard. On that, it seems everyone can agree. Dating app fatigue, a loneliness epidemic and shifting relationship norms all make the modern romantic landscape tricky to navigate.

Dating is difficult for everyone – one report from the Pew Research Center found that 47% of Americans say dating is harder today for most people than it was 10 years ago. But according to a 2022 report, 63% of men under 30 in the US describe themselves as single, as opposed to 34% of women in the same age group. The survey also found that the number of single men who want to date has dropped from 61% to 50% since 2019.

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20th February 2024 14:00
The Guardian
The London ‘hell’ estate fighting back: murders, fires and broken lifts

Milford Towers is a social housing estate in Lewisham, south London, slated for demolition and described by its residents as 'hell'. The residents accuse the council of ignoring them and deliberately running it into the ground. There are frequent leaks, mould infestations, fires, stabbings and violence – and perpetually broken lifts. The Guardian's Adam Sich and Christopher Cherry spent a day there as residents announced that enough was enough, and united to challenge the council to finally start treating them as people.

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20th February 2024 11:25
The Guardian
Why no one is winning the war in Ukraine – video explainer

It has been two years since Russian troops invaded Ukraine, sparking a deadly war that many say is far from over. Western officials have estimated that hundreds of thousands of people have died in the conflict, which has evolved into what experts call the world's first full-scale drone war, with hundreds of drones firing explosives every day. But in the past 12 months, the frontline has barely moved and some say a stalemate has been reached. The Guardian's Andrew Roth explains why the frontlines seem to be frozen and why the war drags on

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19th February 2024 14:23
The Guardian
How will Russia remember Alexei Navalny? – video explainer

The prominent Russian opposition activist has died in prison aged 47. A tireless political organiser, he had personally angered Vladimir Putin, along with the president's closest allies, with his scathing investigations into government corruption.  The Guardian's Andrew Roth looks at Navalny's rise in politics, his legacy and how his death robs Russia’s beleaguered opposition of one of its most dynamic leaders

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16th February 2024 13:13
The Guardian
Teachers in Indiana: share your views on the Eyes on Education site

We would like to speak to teachers as unions call for the site to be shut down

Teachers’ unions in Indiana are calling for the state attorney general to take down a site that asks parents to report “potentially inappropriate materials” in classrooms.

The launch of the Eyes on Education site last week follows a similar tip line opened in Virginia in 2022 and comes against a backdrop of conservative efforts to censor discussion of race and sexual identities in schools.

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14th February 2024 18:39
The Guardian
Farmers in Europe: are you taking part in the protests?

We would like to hear from agriculture workers in mainland Europe and the UK about their views on the protests

Tractors have blockaded the Belgian port of Antwerp, as farmers continue their protests in half a dozen European countries.

Protests have taken place across a number of European nations in recent months including Greece, Germany, Portugal, Poland and France. Last week, some 40 tractors and other farm vehicles blocked roads in Dover, carrying signs with slogans like “No More Cheap Imports”.

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14th February 2024 17:22
The Guardian
Inside the youth anti-abortion movement in the US: 'Victory is on its way' – video

Since the US supreme court's overturning of Roe v Wade, 16 states have enacted stringent bans on nearly all abortions. But that is not enough for a new generation of organised and passionate activists intent on pushing even stricter laws across the country. Carter Sherman spends time with students and organisers at the annual March for Life in Washington DC and meets the influential woman spearheading the national movement

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8th February 2024 11:24