The Guardian
Grand National 2024: I Am Maximus wins thrilling race at Aintree – live reaction

And they’re off … Johnson’s Blue leads in the early stages with two laps to go! … Classic Concorde is now challenging the early leader … Johnnywho is in a good position … Landrake has badly lost his place and Ramo is already in trouble at the back … Storm Nelson is being pushed along … favourite West Balboa is in midfield … Bold Endeavour is in third behind the leaders … West Balboa is making ground … turning towards home and Classic Concorde leads … Gwennie May Boy leads at the last from Lord Snootie and West Balboa and kicks clear for a comfortable win.

1.20 race market movers from Oddspedia

Gwenny May Boy 10/1 into 6/1

Bold Endeavor 20/1 into 12/1

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13th April 2024 17:50
The Guardian
Manchester City v Luton, Stockport and Wrexham heading for promotion: football – live

  • Updates from the 3pm BST kick-offs across the leagues
  • Get in touch! Share your thoughts in an email to Tom

Huge result in the Championship, struggling Blackburn have gone to Leeds and won. Sammie Szmodics (who else?) got the only goal. All eyes on Ipswich now, does anyone want to win the title?

All over at St James’, all the reaction with Barry here:

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13th April 2024 17:49
The Guardian
Bournemouth v Manchester United: Premier League – live

  • Updates from the 5.30pm BST kick-off at the Vitality Stadium
  • Get in touch! Share your thoughts in an email to Barry

Referee: Tony Harrington,

Assistants: Matthew Wilkes and Derek Eaton.

Fourth official: Graham Scott.

VAR: Jarred Gillett.

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13th April 2024 17:44
The Guardian
World’s oldest living conjoined twins die in Pennsylvania, aged 62

Lori and George Schappell were joined at the skull with separate bodies and lived on their own since the age of 24

The world’s oldest living conjoined twins have died at the age of 62 in their native Pennsylvania.

Lori and George Schappell died on 7 April at the hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, according to an obituary. A cause of death was not disclosed.

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13th April 2024 17:32
The Guardian
England sweep Scotland aside in Six Nations despite Amy Cokayne red card

  • Scotland 0-46 England
  • Red Roses run in eight tries to stretch lead at top of table

England’s discipline was a concern for the second time in this Women’s Six Nations as they finished against Scotland with 14 players after Amy Cokayne was shown a red card. The hooker, who started her first international game in a year, was sent off in the 53rd minute after being shown a second yellow card. It was England’s second red card in three games after the No 8 Sarah Beckett was sent off early on in their opener against Italy.

Despite being a player down, England extended their winning run against Scotland to 26 games. Scotland have been waiting 25 years to beat England but the Red Roses ensured their streak would not be broken. John Mitchell’s side are enjoying a perfect tournament in terms of results, topping the table with the maximum 15 points.

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13th April 2024 17:18
The Guardian
A nagging doubt plagues world leaders wooing India: whose side is Narendra Modi really on? | Simon Tisdall

His cult-like status is likely to hand him victory in the coming elections, but at democracy’s loss

Suddenly, everyone loves India. But it’s an affair, not a marriage. Whether it lasts depends on the consequences of this week’s watershed election. At stake are the credibility of Indian democracy and, potentially, the country’s future as a cohesive unitary state.

Courting India as a counterweight to China, the US is ardently pursuing a deeper security relationship. The EU hankers after a free trade pact. Countries ranging from Australia to Norway to the UAE have already forged bespoke deals.

Do you have an opinion on the issues raised in this article? If you would like to submit a letter of up to 250 words to be considered for publication, email it to us at [email protected]

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13th April 2024 17:00
The Guardian
From boom to burst, the AI bubble is only heading in one direction | John Naughton

No one should be surprised that artificial intelligence is following a well-worn and entirely predictable financial arc

“Are we really in an AI bubble,” asked a reader of last month’s column about the apparently unstoppable rise of Nvidia, “and how would we know?” Good question, so I asked an AI about it and was pointed to Investopedia, which is written by humans who know about this stuff. It told me that a bubble goes through five stages – rather as Elisabeth Kübler-Ross said people do with grief. For investment bubbles, the five stages are displacement, boom, euphoria, profit-taking and panic. So let’s see how this maps on to our experience so far with AI.

First, displacement. That’s easy: it was ChatGPT wot dunnit. When it appeared on 30 November 2022, the world went, well, apeshit. So, everybody realised, this was what all the muttering surrounding AI was about! And people were bewitched by the discovery that you could converse with a machine and it would talk (well, write) back to you in coherent sentences. It was like the moment in the spring of 1993 when people saw Mosaic, the first proper web browser, and suddenly the penny dropped: so this was what that “internet” thingy was for. And then Netscape had its initial public offering in August 1995, when the stock went stratospheric and the first internet bubble started to inflate.

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13th April 2024 17:00
The Guardian
E Jean Carroll, writer who bested Trump in court, surrenders gun to police

Police were made aware of unlicensed gun after Carroll testified in court she kept a revolver by her bed

New York writer E Jean Carroll has handed over a gun to police that she was keeping, but without a license, during her long legal battles with Donald Trump after she sued him over sexual abuse, according to a new report.

Police in Warwick, New York, “took possession” of the firearm after discussing the matter with the former Elle magazine columnist, NBC News reported, citing a police report the TV network had obtained.

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13th April 2024 16:57
The Guardian
Crippling mortgages and £16 olive oil: how much have UK prices risen in the past two years?

The government might be celebrating falling inflation, but higher prices for goods and services are here to stay

Two years ago, a two-litre bottle of supermarket olive oil cost about £7. Step into your local branch today and that same bottle will set you back more than £16. Grab a packet of pasta, or some broccoli, and you will pay 95% and 50% more, respectively, than in 2022. If your car insurance renewal is due, that will be an extra 35%-50%.

The Russian invasion of Ukraine almost 26 months ago set off a chain reaction that caused energy and food bills to jump, and ultimately sent inflation in the UK spiralling, reaching a peak of 11.1% in October 2022, the highest rate in 41 years.

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13th April 2024 16:00
The Guardian
On my radar: Katherine Ryan’s cultural highlights

The comedian on her favourite new painter, the downfall of Diddy, and wanting to save Britney Spears

Born in Ontario, Canada in 1983, comedian Katherine Ryan won the Funny Women award in 2008. Since then she has appeared on numerous TV sitcoms and panel shows including Taskmaster and 8 Out of 10 Cats. She has two Netflix standup specials, In Trouble and Glitter Room, and in 2020 created Netflix comedy series The Duchess. She has won the outstanding female comedy entertainment performance award at the National Comedy Awards twice, in 2022 and 2023. She lives in London with her husband and three children. Her new tour, Battleaxe, is coming to venues across the UK from 5 September.

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13th April 2024 16:00
The Guardian
Italian-style cocktails from the Dover – recipes

The Dover restaurant in Mayfair does its New York Italian roots proud with a mean drinks list: we present its martini, the eastside, a bicicletta, the godfather and a New York sour

A selection of our favourite Italian- and Italian-American-inspired cocktails. Many of our cocktails at the Dover are strained into frozen glasses. Put the glass(es) in the freezer for 30 minutes before serving, removing them just a minute or so before pouring your drink(s).

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13th April 2024 16:00
The Guardian
Alexander Isak double leads Newcastle in thrashing of toothless Tottenham

At least it was not quite as bad as last year for Tottenham. Almost exactly 12 months ago, Antonio Conte’s interim managerial successor, Cristian Stellini, presided over a 6-1 defeat here that served to confirm things were seriously awry in north London and set in motion a chain of events concluding with Ange Postecoglou breathing new life into the team.

The Australian’s rescue and reform act remains a work in progress but seemed to be generally working pretty nicely until Tottenham suffered a relapse on Tyneside sufficiently severe to threaten their hopes of Champions League qualification.

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13th April 2024 15:52
The Guardian
Iran’s Revolutionary Guards seize Israeli-affiliated ship

State news agency says MSC Aries was taken in strait of Hormuz and is being transferred to Iran’s territorial waters

A vessel has been seized by Iran’s paramilitary Revolutionary Guards in the strait of Hormuz, 50 nautical miles off the coast of the United Arab Emirates.

Commandos dropped from a helicopter on to an Israeli-affiliated container ship, the Portuguese-flagged MSC Aries, and Iran’s state news agency said the vessel was being transferred to Iran’s territorial waters.

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13th April 2024 15:25
The Guardian
Trump’s latest claim? That he has moderate abortion views – but don't be fooled | Arwa Mahdawi

Trump is walking a tricky tightrope trying to appeal to his evangelical base and moderate voters. His solution? A bunch of contradictory nonsense

In recent years, Donald Trump has sold NFTs, sneakers, and bibles. Now the perennial marketer is busy selling a new and improved version of himself to voters. Meet Don 2.0: a reasonable man with moderate views on abortion.

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13th April 2024 15:00
The Guardian
From Bond to bust: a Sin City hotel’s closing mirrors the new face of Vegas

Tropicana, once host to celebrities, criminals and 007, will be replaced by the city’s new focus of attraction, a sports stadium

Las Vegas’s famous Tropicana hotel is no more. Its guests were abruptly asked to leave earlier this month and its gold-domed casino closed – signaling the end of an icon of classic Sin City life where glamor, celebrity and crime seemed to go hand in hand.

Now the old building will be elaborately demolished with explosives – a tradition of Nevada’s desert gambling mecca – to make way for a sports stadium, symbolizing for many modern Vegas’s image of sanitized mass tourism.

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13th April 2024 15:00
The Guardian
Revealed: the artwork sneaked into a German gallery by an employee – and the story behind it

Technician, 51, who hung his own picture in an exhibition about art world glitches, has been sacked and given a three-year ban

The first picture that greeted visitors to the first-floor exhibition space in Munich’s Pinakothek der Moderne gallery on 23 February may not have immediately grabbed their attention.

The 60cm by 120cm artwork was a retro-looking photograph of a family of four, with the background and parts of the faces and bodies roughly painted over in white. It was unassuming compared with the video- and photo-based artworks in the adjacent rooms, but only on closer inspection might visitors have wondered why there was no label giving the artist or the work’s title.

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13th April 2024 14:27
The Guardian
A Russian pacifist helped Ukrainians flee the country. Then the Kremlin caught him

Alexander Demidenko, who guided refugees back to their homeland, was arrested and tortured by Kremlin forces. One of the many he helped recalls his courage and kindness

Lost and disoriented, Olena Primak stood at Belgorod’s train station, holding tightly to her young daughter’s arm. The scorching summer heat and the long journey had left the Ukrainian refugee on the brink of collapse. Primak had been told to wait for a Russian volunteer called “Alexander” who would help her get back to Ukraine.

“Suddenly, a man with the most generous of smiles appeared at the station,” she recalled. With a gentle countenance, warm eyes and grey hair, the 61-year-old Alexander Demidenko approached Primak, offering to take her bags.

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13th April 2024 14:00
The Guardian
‘Five courses in 55 minutes’: rise of the speedy Michelin-star menu

High-end restaurants in the UK are battling for business as eating – and spending – habits change

A meal at a Michelin-starred restaurant is a chance to savour some of the finest cooking in the country, often over many hours, with several courses and wine pairings.

But high-end restaurants are now turning to speedy set menus to entice customers through the door for weekday lunches, promising diners they can be in and out within an hour.

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13th April 2024 14:00
The Guardian
Democrats bank on abortion in 2024 as Arizona and Florida push stakes higher

Focus on reproductive rights has yielded big wins and Democrats hope threat of more Republican bans will mobilize voters

Kamala Harris’s Friday visit to Arizona was planned before the state’s top court upheld a 160-year-old law that bans almost all abortions. But the news galvanized the vice-president’s message, one that has already yielded stunning victories for liberals since Roe v Wade fell nearly two years ago.

That message is simple: abortion bans happen when Republicans are in charge.

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13th April 2024 14:00
The Guardian
At Bondi Westfield someone said: ‘There’s been a stabbing, we have to go.’ I could see in her face it was real

I was in a department store when an apparently random, and ultimately deadly, stabbing attack began. I hid in a cupboard, then found a fire escape

I was on the fourth floor of the David Jones department store at Bondi Junction Westfield at 3.35pm when another shopper came up behind me and said: “There’s been a stabbing, it’s happening – a shooting, stabbing – we have to go.”

I could see in her face that she had seen something, and it was real. I think she was clutching her daughter’s hand.

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13th April 2024 13:42
The Guardian
Sydney stabbing: seven people dead, including attacker shot by police at Bondi Junction shopping centre

Six people in Australia were stabbed to death in Bondi Junction Westfield shopping centre before attacker was shot dead by police officer

Six people have been killed and numerous others injured, including some in critical condition, after a man went on a stabbing spree at Westfield shopping centre in the Sydney suburb of Bondi Junction.

The attacker was shot dead after being chased by a lone police officer who was on duty on an unrelated matter.

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13th April 2024 13:34
The Guardian
‘Shhh or I’ll shoot you’: family of jailed Christian woman tell of Israeli raid

Troops took Layan Nasir away at gunpoint from her home in the West Bank and her parents haven’t been told where she is

The Israeli troops arrived at about 4am last Saturday to take 23-year-old Layan Nasir away at gunpoint from her parents’ home in the West Bank town of Birzeit. There was no arrest warrant or charges, and her parents haven’t been notified of where she is held.

The only Palestinian Christian woman currently in Israeli detention, her case has been raised by the archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby. “I’m shocked and deeply concerned,” he said in a post on X. “Please pray for Layan’s safety and swift release.”

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13th April 2024 13:00
The Guardian
This is how we do it: ‘My sex drive starter motor is slower than his but just as powerful’

Being open about their mismatched libidos – and a Friday night ‘no sex date’ – helps keep Declan and Celine’s love life revved up

How do you do it? Share the story of your sex life, anonymously

My libido is something we joke about, because I generally crave sex more than Celine

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13th April 2024 13:00
The Guardian
‘Smell is really important for social communication’: how technology is ruining our senses

Scientists say an overreliance on sight and sound is having a detrimental effect on people’s wellbeing and that our devices should deliver a multisensory experience

“Wait a minute, wait a minute. You ain’t heard nothing yet.” So went the first line of audible dialogue in a feature film, 1927’s The Jazz Singer. It was one of the first times that mass media had conveyed the sight and sound of a scene together, and the audience was enthralled.

There have been improvements since: black and white has become colour, frame rates and resolutions have increased and sound quality has improved, but the media we consume still caters overwhelmingly, if not exclusively, to our eyes and ears.

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13th April 2024 13:00
The Guardian
Meera Sodha’s vegan recipe for walnut pasta with oregano | The new vegan

Walnuts get a starring role in this pasta dish with a (sort of) bread sauce

The walnut is a nut I regularly enjoy, but until now I’d never used it in a meal as a hero ingredient. Then I read about Ligurian salsa di noci and it caught my attention because it sounded like a garlicky, walnutty bread sauce. Now, I really love bread sauce, and ever since I made Delia’s circa 1999, I’ve been wondering how I could eat more of it with my main meals. Without wanting to offend the Italians, or the Brits, this is not bread sauce: it is silkier and nuttier, and it is beautiful mixed with twisted trofie pasta and topped with peppery and pungent fresh oregano.

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13th April 2024 13:00
The Guardian
Jump for joy! How cheerleading conquered the world, from Lagos to Ho Chi Minh City

It has gone from the sidelines of American sport to become a competitive global phenomenon that might one day make the Olympics. We meet the international teams bringing the cheer

When photographer Christian Sinibaldi first visited world champion cheerleaders London’s Unity Allstars Black, in January 2020, he had no expectations. In fact, he admits , he had “a few stigmas associated with cheerleaders”. What he learned that day surprised him. “I loved the energy, the connection between people,” he says. It kickstarted a fascination that would take him around the world to capture a sport on the cusp of global popularity, a project that took him from the markets of Ho Chi Minh City to the tunnels of Lagos stadium.

Cheerleading has long been associated with high school movies and glittery sideline entertainment, but it has a rich history – one that has fascinated me since I cheered at high school in the 90s. My master’s thesis was an ethnography of cheerleading, following a squad throughout a season. For my doctoral dissertation, I wrote a cultural history of the sport. Cheerleading began in the US in the late 19th century, growing out of the civil war and finding a place among the sidelines of elite all-male higher education institutions. There were almost no women cheerleaders until men went to war in the 40s. In the latter half of the 20th century it was feminised and sexualised, before evolving into a competitive athletic endeavour of its own as a result of second wave feminism. It has since been further democratised and radicalised – there are squads of all ages and genders, advocating for all manner of social justice causes.

Main image: junior members of Kazakhstan’s Cheer Republic team perform in Independence Square in the capital city, Astana, in front of the Hazrat Sultan mosque. Above: members of Athens’ Amazons cheerleading team practise in the seaside suburb of Vouliagmeni

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13th April 2024 12:58
The Guardian
Art unlocked: critics on the one work that explains the great artists, from Turner to Basquiat

Expressionism, sculpture, video: the art world is so vast and varied it can be difficult to know where to start, even with its biggest names. Our writers suggest the one piece that can help you understand masters old and new

On 26 April 1937 the Basque town of Guernica was bombed by Hitler’s Luftwaffe and the Italian Legionary Air Force. Picasso, a Spanish artist settled in Paris, paid homage to the killed with this cubist history painting. Moments of revelation punch through the jagged mayhem to hit your heart. The baby cradled in a screaming mother’s arms hangs its head upside down, eyes blankly open, mouth obliviously gaping: it is dead, you realise as if for the first time. Picasso asks in each line of this figure what a child’s death means. He poses similarly agonising questions across the canvas: what does it feel like to be the woman in the burning house, arms outstretched to a God who is not showing any mercy today? And how does the universe permit the pain of that screaming horse, its newspaper body pierced and eviscerated? So long as this painting exists the bombing of Guernica will never end but will always be this infinite moment of wrong. Jonathan Jones
See it at:
Museo Reina Sofía, Madrid

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13th April 2024 12:55
The Guardian
Trump derailed Oval Office China talks with Stormy Daniels rant, book says

Then AT&T chief Randall Stephenson says president spent most of meeting about Beijing and tech on diatribe about women and sex

Donald Trump has made antipathy to China a cornerstone of his campaign to return to the White House next year, but according to a new book, he allowed another obsession, over women and sex, to derail a White House meeting with a senior US tech executive meant to address Chinese threats to US telecoms networks.

“You don’t say no to the president,” Randall Stephenson, then chief executive of AT&T, tells the New York Times reporter David Sanger about a summons to the Oval Office in 2019.

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13th April 2024 12:00
The Guardian
Summer in Scandinavia: five eco-friendly ideas to holiday like a local

The essence of a Nordic summer is to lean into a slower pace of life and embrace nature, from staying in a Swedish summer house to gentle canoe tours in Finland

With swimmable harbours in Stockholm, Oslo, Helsinki and across Denmark’s cities, not to mention plenty of ways to enjoy the sea, from kayaking to urban fishing, there’s often a seaside air to Nordic cities in summer, and especially in Oslo.

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13th April 2024 12:00
The Guardian
Why is Donald Trump on trial for $130,000 paid to Stormy Daniels?

Prosecutors say they’re leaning on ‘the bread and butter of our white-collar work’ – falsifying business records

Back when candidate Donald Trump was just starting to fill stadiums across the US with loyal crowds of supporters, he held a fateful meeting that would set the course for the first criminal trial of a former US president, which kicks off Monday.

At that August 2015 meeting, Trump spoke with David Pecker, then-CEO of American Media, the parent company of tabloid the National Enquirer. Pecker told Trump he could be the “eyes and ears” for Trump’s presidential campaign, on the lookout for any salacious stories people were telling about him. Prosecutors would later call this strategy a “catch and kill” scheme.

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13th April 2024 12:00
The Guardian
Reports of Sunak’s foul mood in No 10 echo the final days of other dying administrations

Stories have emerged of a foul mood in Downing Street; it was ever thus behind the scenes in a dying administration

If Rishi Sunak was able to set aside four hours to see the 84-year-old Sir Ian McKellen playing Falstaff in London’s West End, he would have a powerful reminder not just of the longevity of some careers but also how uneasily some wear the crown.

By many accounts, Sunak is struggling with the prospect that his brief stint wearing the Conservative crown will come to a shuddering halt this autumn.

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13th April 2024 11:00
The Guardian
Eighty-five-year-old Idaho woman saves herself and son from burglar in ‘heroic act’

Christine Jenneiahn shot and mortally wounded a man who broke into her home at night and handcuffed her to a chair

At 85 years old, Christine Jenneiahn might have seemed particularly vulnerable to the man who broke into her Idaho home, pistol-whipped her and handcuffed her to a chair.

But investigators say Jenneiahn saved herself as well as her son – whom authorities described as disabled – from the intruder by grabbing a revolver she had hidden under her pillow, shooting and mortally wounding the violent burglar.

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13th April 2024 11:00
The Guardian
Indira Varma: ‘The worst thing anyone’s said to me? Go back to where you came from’

The actor on racist abuse, being a cocktail waitress in the ‘unwoke’ 90s and a wardrobe malfunction

Born in Somerset, Indira Varma, 50, studied at Rada and made her screen debut in Mira Nair’s 1996 film Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love. Her television work includes Rome, Game of Thrones, Patrick Melrose, Obi-Wan Kenobi and Obsession. On stage she has appeared in Twelfth Night, The Seagull and Present Laughter for which she won an Olivier Award in 2020. She recently starred with Ralph Fiennes in Macbeth in London; the production is now running in Washington DC. Her new film The Trouble with Jessica is in cinemas. She lives in London with her husband, actor Colin Tierney and their daughter.

What is your greatest fear?
Slugs. And planetary annihilation.

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13th April 2024 10:30
The Guardian
European cities hope jet-setting Taylor Swift fans will splash the cash for Eras tour

The superstar arrives in Europe next month – and Swifties, tourist boards and venues are already preparing

Tim Brown, 44, and his wife, Marcella, 34, may not consider themselves bona fide “Swifties”, but when it was announced last June that Taylor Swift would be visiting their corner of the globe this summer they could not resist joining the scramble for a pair of tickets.

A post-pandemic appetite for live music events has fuelled huge worldwide interest in the American singer-songwriter’s Eras tour, which surpassed in $1bn sales in November to become the highest-grossing series of concerts in history.

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13th April 2024 10:00
The Guardian
From Scoop to Civil War: why is it so hard to portray journalism on screen?

The character of the journalist continues to be a trusty mainstay on both the big and small screen, but noble intentions aren’t enough to overcome cliche

If you grew up watching film and TV, you could be forgiven for believing that journalism was a popular, vaunted career. For nearly as long as writers have written movies, they have written about their jobs, and journalism – the work of chasing tips and collecting facts and creating news – is good for plot and some moral gristle. It’s also easy shorthand for a host of character traits, particularly for women – obsessive, frazzled, ambitious, independent, intelligent, perfectionist.

Media is also a famously self-obsessed industry, and for as long as there have been journalism movies, journalists like me have quibbled about their portrayals. The stereotypes nearly write themselves. In the serious journalism picture, such as Bombshell, She Said or Spotlight: female journalists doing their jobs well, confirming liberal sensibilities of the work’s importance (and of giving most of one’s life to it). In the romcom, a workaholic striver who can’t Type A their way to happiness, à la Anne Hathaway in the Devil Wears Prada or Reese Witherspoon’s frantic news anchor in Apple TV+’s the Morning Show. Sometimes the depictions are just laughably ridiculous – Anna Chlumsky’s New York mag reporter typing at her desk while going into labor, Amy Adams’s local crime reporter sleeping with the lead detective in Sharp Objects, Kate Hudson’s groundbreaking women’s magazine column titled “How to: Bring Peace to Tajikistan” in How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days.

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13th April 2024 09:02
The Guardian
Watching live as Haaland, Bellingham and Mbappé fluffed their lines was exhilarating | Barney Ronay

The world’s three best players had stinkers, but it did not detract from a pair of breathtaking Champions League games

This week I travelled 3,000 miles to watch the three best footballers in the world so you didn’t have to. All three of them were terrible. And it was great.

The Champions League quarter-finals were great. The early morning budget airline flights worked. All four teams were excellent in different ways. Just being allowed to report on Real Madrid v Manchester City, followed by Paris Saint-Germain v Barcelona the next day, walking through those city spaces while four sets of fans had a moment in the spring sunshine was a privilege, and a reminder of the many good things that are still there – warmth, collectivism, open borders – all of this only slightly overshadowed by Islamic State saying it wanted to machine-gun everyone.

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13th April 2024 09:00
The Guardian
Caitlin Clark can take women’s basketball to a level never seen before

The all-time leading scorer in college basketball is about to turn pro as viewing figures break men’s records

Since the NCAA women’s basketball tournament final on Sunday drew more US television viewers than the men’s final for the first time in history, it has been hailed as a watershed moment for women’s sports in America. A vanguard of star players including Connecticut’s Paige Bueckers, LSU’s Angel Reese and Southern California’s JuJu Watkins have lifted the profile of the women’s game to unprecedented heights over the past few months while recalibrating expectations for how all women’s sports can be covered, commercialised and consumed.

But none of them have commanded the national consciousness quite like Caitlin Clark, the ponytailed once-in-a-generation talent from the University of Iowa whose modest 6ft frame belies her outsized impact on college basketball and American sports at large.

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13th April 2024 09:00
The Guardian
Ukraine air defences overwhelmed as Russia pounds power stations

Kyiv running short of missile defence systems while US military aid dries up

Ukraine’s air defences are being overwhelmed by concentrated waves of Russian bombing aimed at its power stations, acknowledged a senior presidential adviser after the destruction of an entire plant on Thursday.

Mykhailo Podolyak said Moscow was adopting new tactics of attacking power stations with up to “10 or 12 missiles at a time”, bypassing already stretched Patriot and other missile shields.

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13th April 2024 08:20
The Guardian
Samantha Cameron: ‘Public scrutiny made me obsessed with clothes that won’t let you down’

Wife of former PM says her time in No 10 helped shape her Cefinn clothing brand, which is opening a London store

While the Tories are in freefall, one former first couple are bucking the trend. Samantha Cameron, the designer and founder of the fashion brand Cefinn and wife of the former prime minister David Cameron, is about to open her first bricks-and-mortar store. The Belgravia boutique puts her back in the public eye, just as the role of foreign secretary has returned her husband to the frontline of politics.

Cefinn steers a course between garden-party nostalgia and modern life. Its sleek long floral dresses are aimed at a well-to-do customer who has taken half a day off work to be at a school sports day but needs to be back at the office to lead a meeting by 2pm.

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13th April 2024 08:00
The Guardian
Network of ‘ghost roads’ paves the way for levelling Asia-Pacific rainforests

Bulldozed tracks and informal byways in tropical forests and palm-oil plantations ‘almost always’ an indicator of future deforestation, say researchers

A vast network of undocumented “ghost roads” is pushing into the world’s untouched rainforests and driving their destruction in the Asia-Pacific region, a new study has found.

By using Google Earth to map tropical forests on Borneo, Sumatra and New Guinea islands, researchers from James Cook University in Australia documented 1.37 m kilometres (850,000 miles) of roads across 1.4m sq kilometres of rainforest on the islands – between three and seven times what is officially recorded on road databases.

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13th April 2024 08:00
The Guardian
Dynamic in South China Sea is changing through growing US and Japan ties, says Philippines president

Ferdinand Marcos Jr says building trilateral ties vital, after the three countries criticise China’s ‘dangerous and aggressive behaviour’ in the region

A cooperation agreement by the Philippines, the United States and Japan will change the dynamic in the South China Sea and the region, the Philippine president has said, while seeking to assure China it was not a target.

“I think the trilateral agreement is extremely important,” Ferdinand Marcos Jr told a press conference in Washington on Friday, a day after meeting President Joe Biden and the Japanese prime minister, Fumio Kishida, in the nations’ first trilateral summit.

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13th April 2024 07:00
The Guardian
Blind date: ‘Did we kiss? In public? Heavens, no, we’re British! But we did have a warm goodbye hug’

Sonia, 72, a retired civil servant, meets Stefan, 70, a software engineer

What were you hoping for?
An enjoyable meal in pleasant company.

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13th April 2024 07:00
The Guardian
Strasbourg court’s Swiss climate ruling could have global impact, say experts

Decision by European court of human rights around vulnerability of older women to heatwaves marks significant shift

A landmark legal ruling at the European court of human rights could open the floodgates for a slew of new court cases around the world, experts have said.

The Strasbourg-based court said earlier this week that Switzerland’s failure to do enough to cut its national greenhouse gas emissions was a clear violation of the human rights of a group of more than 2,000 older Swiss women. The women argued successfully that their rights to privacy and family life were being breached because they were particularly vulnerable to the health impacts of heatwaves.

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13th April 2024 06:00
The Guardian
Weekend podcast: what’s it like to be a sociopath?; Gen Z’s lust for Sex and the City; and Marina Hyde on President The Rock

Marina Hyde with her take on Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson’s surreal US presidential bid (1m23s); Emine Saner meets the sociopath who learned to behave – and found happiness (8m05s); why Gen Z has fallen in love with Sex and the City (24m45s); and do our political opponents really hate us? (29m54s).

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13th April 2024 06:00
The Guardian
Eleanor Coppola, Emmy award winning director, dies aged 87

Coppola known for Hearts of Darkness, film chronicling tortured production of husband Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now

Eleanor Coppola, the Emmy award-winning director, artist and writer, died Friday at her home in Rutherford, California, her family announced in a statement. She was 87.

Coppola, also known as a documentarian, won an Emmy award in 1992 for her film Hearts of Darkness, which chronicled the infamously tortured production of her husband Francis Ford Coppola’s film Apocalypse Now. She also directed romantic comedies Paris Can Wait (2016) and Love Is Love Is Love (2020).

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13th April 2024 03:47
The Guardian
Australia’s surf star Ethan Ewing: ‘Anything to do with the Olympics is on another level’ | Kieran Pender

After breaking his back at the fearsome Teahupo’o, the ‘Ice Man’ will face his demons in Tahiti later this year in a bid for gold

When Ethan Ewing first began competing on the junior surfing circuit, his rivals developed a nickname for the young Australian. Even as a teenager, the North Stradbroke surfer exuded preternatural composure while in the water during a heat. He would sit in the middle of the line-up with priority, the right to take off on any given wave, and control proceedings. While other surfers chased smaller sets, taking off on wave after wave, Ewing knew he only needed two scores to win a heat. He would sit still and wait for the right wave, the right moment to pounce.

When it came, more often than not Ewing would perfectly execute and secure a heat-winning score. His unflappable focus earned him the nickname “Ice Man”, and a junior world title. Nearly a decade on, as the Olympics loom in barely 100 days’ time, the world number two’s steely edge has him in contention for a gold medal at Paris 2024.

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13th April 2024 02:00
The Guardian
Joe Lycett discloses four fake stories he planted in UK media

Stories include man with bruise in shape of Prince Harry and statue of H from Steps being erected in Wales

The comedian Joe Lycett has disclosed the fake stories that he successfully planted in the British media over the past month included a man with a bruise in the shape of Prince Harry and a statue of H from Steps being erected in his home town of Cowbridge in Wales.

In the first episode of his new Channel 4 show, Lycett said four stories that were covered by newspapers and television news were fabricated.

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13th April 2024 00:22
The Guardian
Ex-US ambassador sentenced to 15 years in prison for serving as secret agent for Cuba

Manuel Rocha, 73, will also pay a $500,000 fine after pleading guilty to conspiring to act as an agent of a foreign government

A former career US diplomat was sentenced Friday to 15 years in federal prison after admitting he worked for decades as a secret agent for Cuba, in a plea agreement that leaves many unanswered questions about a betrayal that stunned the US foreign service.

Manuel Rocha, 73, will also pay a $500,000 fine and cooperate with authorities after pleading guilty to conspiring to act as an agent of a foreign government. In exchange, prosecutors dismissed more than a dozen other counts, including wire fraud and making false statements.

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13th April 2024 00:01
The Guardian
China supporting Russia in massive military expansion, US says

Beijing helping with drone production, space-based capabilities and ballistic missile production

China is helping Russia undertake its biggest military expansion since Soviet times, ramping up sales of machine tools, microelectronics and other technology that Moscow is using to produce missiles, tanks, aircraft and other weaponry for its war against Ukraine, according to a US assessment.

US officials are hoping the release of the intelligence will encourage European allies to press China, as the German chancellor, Olaf Scholz, heads to Beijing this weekend and G7 foreign ministers meet next week in Italy.

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12th April 2024 23:37
The Guardian
Wincing Tiger Woods endures his marathon to make Masters history

The 48-year-old became the first player to make the cut on 24 consecutive occasions after playing 23 holes on day two

No one around the 14th at Augusta National on Friday morning seemed to have had too much sleep. There was Caroline, 56, who had been kept awake by her knee. She had twisted it by slipping on a set of steps last week, and it was still aching after all the walking she’d done on the opening day. And there was Josh, 15, who had been so excited he’d woken up two hours before his family needed to leave for the course. And there was Simon, 31, who had a skinful the previous evening, and had been dragged out of bed by his housemates.

And there were a few thousand others, too. At 48, Tiger Woods still draws a gallery three times the size of anyone else here. The sun was just up above the pines, the sky was clear and the day stretched ahead like an open road. So however restless they felt about it the moment they woke, they, and everyone else, enjoyed the satisfaction of knowing that, at this particular moment, there was nowhere else in the world they would rather have been than where they were: beside the tee box watching Woods get ready to hit his first shot of the second day of the 88th Masters.

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12th April 2024 23:32
The Guardian
Shell says it ‘lobbies for energy transition’ during climate ruling appeal

Company is fighting Dutch court ruling that says it must emit 45% less CO2 by 2030 than in 2019

Shell has argued that it “lobbies for, not against, the energy transition” on the final day of its appeal against an important climate ruling.

The fossil fuel company is fighting the decision of a Dutch court in 2021 that forces it to pump 45% less planet-heating CO2 into the atmosphere by 2030 than it did in 2019. In court on Friday, Shell argued the ruling is ineffective, onerous and does not fit into the existing legal system.

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12th April 2024 22:42
The Guardian
The week around the world in 20 pictures

War in Gaza, destruction in Ukraine, protests in Naples and a total eclipse of the sun: the last seven days as captured by the world’s leading photojournalists

Warning: this gallery contains images that some readers may find distressing

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12th April 2024 20:24
The Guardian
Oil and gas firms must pay more to drill on public lands under new Biden rule

Rule adds stronger requirements for cleaning up wells but does not ban leasing on public lands, as called for by environmentalists

Oil and gas companies will have to pay more to drill on public lands and satisfy stronger requirements to clean up old or abandoned wells, according to a final rule issued on Friday by the Biden administration.

The interior department’s rule raises royalty rates for oil drilling by one-third, to 16.67%, in accordance with the sweeping 2002 climate law approved by Congress.

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12th April 2024 19:46
The Guardian
‘This coast is saturated’: Italian village braces for post-Ripley crowds

Netflix hit series based on Patricia Highsmith novel brings prospect of surge in visitors to Atrani area of Amalfi coast

When Andrew Scott’s eponymous character in the hit new Netflix series Ripley travels from Naples to the village of Atrani, the rickety bus has the road almost to itself; a solitary Vespa passes going the other way. When he tracks down Dickie Greenleaf at the beach, the rich American and his girlfriend are the only people sunbathing on the pristine sands.

Visitors to the Amalfi coast today will note the contrast. Unlike in 1961, the road between Positano and Salerno is now known as much for its traffic jams as for the views. Atrani may be less busy than its neighbour Amalfi, but in summer its beach is taken over by rows of umbrellas and sunbeds. A small area, perhaps a fifth of the space, is public spiaggia libera.

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12th April 2024 18:37
The Guardian
Before-and-after footage shows destruction of Khan Younis – video

Footage shows the extent of devastation in the southern Gaza city of Khan Younis after the recent withdrawal of Israeli ground troops. The city had come under Israeli bombardment in recent months. Thousands of Palestinians returned this week, after Israel unexpectedly announced on 7 April it was withdrawing its forces from southern Gaza

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12th April 2024 16:57
The Guardian
‘So it’s you. Here you are’: Salman Rushdie describes moment he was stabbed

In first TV interview since his stabbing, writer tells how knifeman was ‘last thing my right eye would ever see’

Salman Rushdie has said that his first thought upon seeing the man who would stab him on stage in August 2022 was: “So it’s you. Here you are.”

“It felt like something coming out of the distant past and trying to drag me back in time, if you like, back into that distant past, in order to kill me,” said the Indian-born British-American author of books including The Satanic Verses and Midnight’s Children.

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12th April 2024 16:00
The Guardian
Aintree fashion and the Thai new year: photos of the day – Friday

The Guardian’s picture editors select photographs from around the world

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12th April 2024 15:46
The Guardian
‘It’s a sun trap’: climate crisis brings boomtime for British wine

UK vineyards are thriving as far north as Yorkshire and Scotland as investors cash in on tax breaks and hotter summers

“We’ve never had frost here,” says Adrian Pike, gesturing across rows of vines just starting to show signs of tiny buds in the weak Kent spring sunshine.

Westwell vineyard is on the site of a former monastery and sits close to the Pilgrims’ Way on the North Downs, the historic route to Canterbury that runs along the top of the hill behind the vineyard.

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12th April 2024 14:11
The Guardian
‘This isn’t how good scientific debate happens’: academics on culture of fear in gender medicine research

Cass review found professionals in the field are scared to discuss views amid risk of reputational damage and online abuse

Critical thinking and open debate are pillars of scientific and medical research. Yet experienced professionals are increasingly scared to openly discuss their views on the treatment of children questioning their gender identity.

This was the conclusion drawn by Hilary Cass in her review of gender identity services for children this week, which warned that a toxic debate had resulted in a culture of fear.

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12th April 2024 14:10
The Guardian
An ex-child abuse US detective admitted to molesting minors. He could soon be free

A judge signed off on Stanley Burkhardt, who was investigated for a series of Louisiana killings, to transfer to a halfway house

A former child sex crimes detective who admitted to molesting children during his New Orleans policing career, has been in and out of prison for images depicting the sexual abuse of minors, and has been investigated in connection with a series of killings, has gotten another opportunity at relative freedom.

After a parole violation caused him to spend the last few years in intensive therapy at a federal prison in North Carolina for people who, like him, have been deemed sexually dangerous, Stanley Burkhardt was recently transferred to a halfway house, according to records reviewed on Thursday by the Guardian.

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12th April 2024 12:00
The Guardian
‘We need to keep trying’: tackling Greece’s falling birthrate – in pictures

With Greece’s fertility rate one of the lowest in Europe, in May the government plans to introduce measures such as cash benefits for families, affordable housing for young people, financial incentives for assisted reproduction, and incorporating migrants into the workforce

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12th April 2024 11:15
The Guardian
‘It is simply best not to get pregnant’: women left terrified as Haiti’s maternity services collapse

Delivering a baby was already risky, but an unprecedented surge in gang violence has forced clinics and hospitals to close

The worst fears of midwives at Heartline Haiti were realised last week. As they prepared the maternity clinic for patients that evening, armed men laid siege to their neighbourhood in eastern Port-au-Prince, spraying bullets at police and rival gangs, setting cars on fire and ransacking houses.

“All of our staff were huddled in an interior hallway hearing the noises outside the gates and walls, afraid they may be next,” says Tara Livesay, the NGO’s executive director. “A gang member was shot dead outside, just two doors over.”

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12th April 2024 11:00
The Guardian
Nepo-disasters: why Ewan and Clara McGregor are only the latest onscreen parent-child embarrassment

For every Wall Street or Wild at Heart there are countless cringeworthy examples of Hollywood power players elbowing their own kids into the picture. Adam Sandler alone has made two dozen with his

If the dismal reviews meted out to the new film Bleeding Love prove anything at all, it’s that parents need to think very carefully before starring in movies with their children. This film – which Peter Bradshaw called “a complete toe-curling nepo vanity project” – stars Ewan McGregor and his real-life daughter Clara. And on paper that sounds great. After all, every parent-child relationship is a complex cocktail of affection, antagonism and resentment, and that really should work gangbusters on screen. If you’re going to bring baggage to a role, it may as well be the baggage that literally defines who you are.

It is clear that, with Bleeding Love, this didn’t happen. But don’t think for a second that this is a one-off mishap signifying some grave fault on the part of the McGregors. Parent-child movies rarely work.

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12th April 2024 09:38
The Guardian
The week in wildlife – in pictures: greedy pelican and capricorn rising

The best of this week’s wildlife photographs from around the world

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12th April 2024 09:00
The Guardian
Dinosaur data: can the bones of the deep past help predict extinctions of the future?

Millions of years ago, animals adapted to become warm-blooded amid huge climactic changes. Now scientists hope these clues from the past could help us understand what lies ahead

In Chicago’s Field Museum, behind a series of access-controlled doors, are about 1,500 dinosaur fossil specimens. The palaeobiologist Jasmina Wiemann walks straight past the bleached leg bones – some as big as her – neither does she glance at the fully intact spinal cord, stained red by iron oxides filling the spaces where there was once organic material. She only has eyes for the deep chocolate-brown fossils: these are the ones containing preserved organic matter – bones that offer unprecedented insights into creatures that went extinct millions of years ago.

Wiemann is part of the burgeoning field of conservation palaeobiology, where researchers are looking to the deep past to predict future extinction vulnerability. At a time when humans could be about to witness a sixth mass extinction, studying fossil records is particularly useful for understanding how the natural world responded to problems before we arrived: how life on Earth reacted to environmental change over time, how species adapted to planet-scale temperature changes, or what to expect when ocean geochemical cycles change.

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12th April 2024 08:00
The Guardian
Disappearing tongues: the endangered language crisis – podcast

Linguistic diversity on Earth is far more profound and fundamental than previously imagined. But it’s also crumbling fast. By Ross Perlin

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12th April 2024 06:00
The Guardian
How badly has US diplomacy been damaged by the war in Gaza? – podcast

Criticism of Israel’s war strategy has been growing in recent months, but last week there was a marked shift in tone from western leaders after seven aid workers were killed by an Israeli strike. The most notable change has come from the US president, Joe Biden, who this week turned on Benjamin Netanyahu, declaring Israel’s approach to the war a ‘mistake’.

This week, Jonathan Freedland speaks to a former negotiator in the Middle East, Aaron David Miller, about whether pressure from within his own party will force Biden to stop supplying arms to the US’s biggest ally in the Middle East, and what the future holds for the relationship between the US and Israel when the war ends

Archive: ABC News, Al Jazeera, BBC, Bloomberg, CBS News, Channel 4, NBC, PBS Newshour

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12th April 2024 06:00
The Guardian
Carers scandal: why are so many being prosecuted by the UK government?

George Henderson was convicted of fraud and had to repay £19,500 in carer’s allowance years after ticking the wrong box on the form. He is not alone. The Guardian’s social policy editor, Patrick Butler, looks at why thousands are facing prosecution over innocent mistakes

In 2010, George Henderson wrongly ticked a box saying he was unemployed while filling in the “tricky” application form for carer’s allowance. He had thought the Department for Work and Pensions was asking about his son John, who has learning difficulties and is addicted to heroin.

Ticking that box has changed Henderson’s life. He said he was dragged through the courts, convicted of fraud and had to sell his home to pay back almost £20,000 in benefit overpayments after the DWP decided to prosecute him. The department recently acknowledged that Henderson had made an innocent mistake.

Henderson is not alone. The Guardian social policy editor, Patrick Butler, tells Helen Pidd that he has been investigating why so many carers are being taken to court for benefit fraud. He explores what could be done to address a story that is drawing parallels with the Post Office Horizon IT scandal.

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12th April 2024 04:00
The Guardian
OJ Simpson: from sporting stardom to the murder trial of the century – video obituary

OJ Simpson, the former American football star, actor and notorious suspected double murderer, has died of cancer at 76. His 1995 trial, and controversial acquittal, for the deaths of his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend Ronald Goldman, provided one of the world’s most-watched popular culture events of the last century.

'On April 10th, our father, Orenthal James Simpson, succumbed to his battle with cancer. He was surrounded by his children and grandchildren. During this time of transition, his family asks that you please respect their wishes for privacy and grace,' the statement from his family said.

One of the most successful and popular sports stars of his generation, Simpson’s career with the San Francisco 49ers and Buffalo Bills, as well as his post-retirement starring roles in Hollywood movies such as The Naked Gun, was ultimately overshadowed by the 1994 murders and their aftermath. The events heralded a blending of celebrity and crime that has become a staple of media ever since.

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11th April 2024 22:37
The Guardian
Barça’s kids are alright and Dortmund give themselves a chance - Football Weekly Extra

Max Rushden is joined by Barry Glendenning, Lars Sivertsen and Mark Langdon after another brilliant Champions League quarter final between PSG and Barcelona

Rate, review, share on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud, Acast and Stitcher, and join the conversation on Facebook, Twitter and email.

On the podcast today; PSG and Barcelona play out another classic in this season’s Champions League quarter-finals. Both teams enjoying periods of dominance, every substitute making a difference. A great game – and perfectly poised for the second leg.

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11th April 2024 12:49
The Guardian
South Korean opposition claim landslide win in parliamentary elections – video

Liberal opposition parties in South Korea won more than three-fifths of seats in national assembly elections. Senior members of the conservative People Power party (PPP) offered to resign in response to its heavy defeat, which has severely weakened the president, Yoon Suk Yeol

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11th April 2024 10:45
The Guardian
Party in a quarry! My decade of wild Euro raves – in pictures

From all-nighters in Spanish factories and communal living in France to a solar eclipse in Hungary, Seana Gavin documents a party scene that became a way of life

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11th April 2024 08:00
The Guardian
The senior Swiss women who went to court over climate change, and won – podcast

This week, in a landmark case, the European court of human rights ruled that Switzerland’s weak climate policy had violated the rights of a group of older Swiss women to family life. Ian Sample talks to Europe environment correspondent Ajit Niranjan about why the women brought the case and what the ruling could mean for future climate policy.

Read Ajit Niranjan’s article about the court case

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11th April 2024 06:00
The Guardian
Stormy Daniels, Donald Trump, and the start of the hush money trial – podcast

Hugo Lowell talks through the law and the politics of a case starting this Monday against Donald Trump – the first ever criminal trial of a former or sitting US president

On Monday, in a courtroom in New York, Donald Trump will become the first ever sitting or former US president to face a criminal trial.

As Hugo Lowell explains to Hannah Moore, it is a case that revolves around alleged payments made to the adult film star Stormy Daniels in the run-up to the 2016 presidential election – and, as New York prosecutors argue, the attempts by Trump and his campaign team to then cover them up.

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11th April 2024 04:00
The Guardian
French athlete sets world record for rope climbing at Eiffel Tower – video

A French woman has broken the world rope climbing record after reaching the second floor of the Eiffel Tower on Wednesday. Anouk Garnier, 34, climbed 110m in 18 minutes to set a new high and raise money for cancer prevention and support. 'I can't believe what I've just done, it's so insane,' Garnier said 'I've visualised this moment so much, worked so hard for a year to get here that I can't believe it's really happened'

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10th April 2024 17:47
The Guardian
Footage reveals destruction in Khan Younis after Israeli withdrawal – video

Israel has announced it is withdrawing its troops from southern Gaza for 'tactical reasons', as a new round of talks to establish a ceasefire begins in Egypt. Footage emerging from Khan Younis shows the scale of destruction wrought on the city after months of fighting

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8th April 2024 10:04
The Guardian
People in the US: share your ‘modern wedding etiquette’ suggestions

Have you asked for cash gifts from your guests, rather than a stainless steel dining set? We want to hear from you

While the notion of marriage may be steeped in tradition, many couples like to add a modern twist to etiquette and their own stamp on “the rules”.

In fact, in 2024, established norms at wedding ceremonies are relatively loose. For example, it’s fine for a bridesmaid not go to the bachelorette party if she can’t afford it.

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6th April 2024 16:00
The Guardian
Teachers: tell us about moving from abroad to a school in England

We want to speak with teachers from Jamaica and other countries that have seen a rise in those moving to a job in England

Schools in England are increasingly recruiting teachers from overseas, with an impact on school staff shortages in countries such as Jamaica.

We would like to speak with teachers who have recently moved countries to teach in a school in England. If you moved in the last two years, tell us about your experience. Why did you decide to move? How do you feel about it? Do you have any concerns?

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3rd April 2024 14:04
The Guardian
‘Hidden in plain sight’: the European city tours of slavery and colonialism

From Puerta del Sol plaza in Madrid to the Tuileries Garden in Paris, guides reshape stories continent tells about itself

Dodging between throngs of tourists and workers on their lunch breaks in Madrid’s Puerta del Sol plaza, we stop in front of the nearly 3-tonne statue depicting King Carlos III on a horse. Playfully nicknamed Madrid’s best mayor, Carlos III is credited with modernising the city’s lighting, sewage systems and rubbish removal.

Kwame Ondo, the tour guide behind AfroIbérica Tours, offers up another, albeit lesser-known tidbit about the monarch. “He was one of the biggest slave owners of his time,” says Ondo, citing the 1,500 enslaved people he kept on the Iberian peninsula and the 18,500 others held in Spain’s colonies in the Americas. As aristocratic families sought to keep up with the monarch, the proportion of enslaved people in Madrid swelled to an estimated 4% of the population in the 1780s.

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2nd April 2024 17:30
The Guardian
‘Healthcare cannot afford the climate emergency’: the business case for sustainability

A critical care doctor and a hospital’s chief financial officer count the cost of the planet’s problems – and find new ways to address them

Growing up, Dr Richard Hixson was always intrigued by the hidden wonders of the sea. Indeed, he dreamed of becoming a marine biologist before opting for a career in medicine.

Now, as an NHS consultant in critical care medicine and an environmental campaigner, Hixson often points to the fate of our rivers, coastlines and the open ocean as a particularly pertinent example of the need to pursue greater sustainability within the healthcare sector.

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28th March 2024 17:22
The Guardian
Our lives in the UK asylum system: 'the power of fear' – video

The Guardian has been working with a group of community reporters in Rochdale and Oldham who wanted to highlight the realities for women in the asylum system across Greater Manchester. Supported by the Elephants Trail, the group met women stuck in the asylum backlog, women traumatised by detention and women struggling to find housing. They were all volunteering in their communities, while reckoning with a hostile climate towards refugees and asylum seekers. This film is part of a collaborative video series called Made in Britain

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28th March 2024 13:33
The Guardian
Sites of resistance: threatened African burial grounds around the world

Too often cemeteries for enslaved people have been all but erased from history but how we remember matters

For archeologists, what defines people as human is how we bury our dead. Imagine, then, a society that relegates a whole community as legally inhuman, enslaved with no rights. In spite of slavery, African burial grounds are tangible reminders of the enslaved and free – defying oppressive circumstances by reclaiming people’s humanity through acts of remembrance.

When I first visited the British overseas territory of St Helena in 2018 and saw the burial ground in Rupert’s Valley, I was astounded by its size and significance. It unambiguously placed the island at the centre of the Middle Passage – tying the British empire to the institution of slavery in the US, the Caribbean, and globally.

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28th March 2024 12:00
The Guardian
Scraping away generations of forgetting: my fight to honour the Africans buried on St Helena

A braid from a formerly enslaved African buried on the island was the catalyst for Annina van Neel’s work to preserve and share these histories

At the end of January 2012, I arrived on St Helena after a six-day journey by ship from Cape Town. After being surrounded by water for nearly a week, the sight of land on the midnight-blue horizon was overwhelming. It was as though someone had forgotten their piece of land in the middle of the South Atlantic Ocean. 47 square miles of volcanic rock, 2,810 miles from the coast of Brazil and 1,610 miles from Angola – an oasis in a desert, an enigma.

I arrived on the island as part of the project team constructing St Helena’s first airport. Previously accessible only by sea, this incredible community, which had been defined by its isolation as an outpost and a place of exile for 500 years, would for the first time be easily reached by the rest of the world.

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27th March 2024 12:00
The Guardian
St Helena urged to return remains of 325 formerly enslaved people to Africa

British overseas territory may face legal action over alleged failure to honour reburial plan after remains found during airport project

A British overseas territory is being urged to return the remains of 325 formerly enslaved people to their ancestral kingdoms in Africa, or potentially face legal action.

The remains were excavated in 2008 when an access road to a new airport was being built on the remote South Atlantic Ocean island of St Helena. They were held in storage for 14 years before being reburied.

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27th March 2024 12:00
The Guardian
Ecodesign in healthcare: from MRI to ultrasound, the picture is changing

The link between human and environmental health is clearer than ever, and the need for action has never been more urgent. Here’s how technological innovation can bring about change

A world with fewer carbon emissions but less healthcare innovation would not be a better place. That was the message from Bill Gates as he gave the opening address at the COP28 Health Day in November 2023, the first of its kind. But if advances in technology and digital solutions are essential to easing suffering and preventing illness, how can we ensure they continue apace – without doing more harm than good?

Globally, the healthcare industry accounts for 4.4% of the world’s CO2 emissions, according to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. It’s also a wasteful industry and heavy consumer of natural resources – 10% of raw materials are extracted every year to serve it, while up to 13kg of waste per hospital bed are generated each day.

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15th March 2024 13:48
The Guardian
Caring for patients and cutting carbon: how a pioneering cancer clinic is reducing emissions

A hospital’s work to limit its environmental impact is creating better treatments for patients while lessening harm to the planet

Perched on a dramatic riverbank and filled with towering tropical plants, the Champalimaud Clinical Centre in Lisbon is not what comes to mind with the words “cancer treatment” – but the work it is doing could be a template for the future of healthcare.

New cancer cases across the world are predicted to increase by more than 50% by 2040, according to the Global Cancer Observatory. And with increased demand for treatment will come a cost that is only now being addressed – its impact on the environment. Given that the world’s healthcare sector is already responsible for 4.4% of the planet’s carbon emissions – surprisingly more than aviation or shipping – the implications for the climate crisis are significant.

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15th February 2024 13:42
The Guardian
Guardian Weekly readers: share your best recent pictures with us

Share your recent photos and tell us where you were and why that scene resonated with you

The Guardian Weekly is our international news magazine, featuring the best of the Guardian, the Observer and our digital journalism in one beautifully designed and illustrated package.

We’re now on the lookout for our readers’ best photographs of the world around us. For a chance to feature in the magazine, send us a picture you took recently, telling us where it is in the world, when you took it and why the scene resonated with you at that particular moment.

Try to upload the highest resolution possible. The limit for photo uploads is 5MB.

Landscape images are preferable due to the page design

Tell us as much as you can about when and where the photo was taken as well as what was happening

When we publish an image we want to credit you so please ensure that we have contact information and your full name

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23rd January 2024 18:09
The Guardian
Sustainability in healthcare: the impact of the health sector on the environment

From CT scans to anaesthesia, healthcare has a bigger carbon footprint than aviation. Will Cop28, with its aim to curb the sector’s global emissions, accelerate change?

A pledge to do no harm is often central to oaths taken by medical students on their way to becoming doctors. It’s a tenet that dates back to Hippocrates and the Ancient Greeks – but is it still being followed?

As the climate crisis intensifies and new information comes to light, it seems that the global healthcare industry, with its vast carbon footprint, needs to take action now to protect those it serves.

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22nd December 2023 10:37
The Guardian
Tell us: how did you meet your close friend or partner?

The Guardian’s How we met column has been publishing your tales of true love – now we want to hear about your friendships too

For the past four years the Guardian’s How we met column has been publishing your tales of true love. Now we want to hear about your friendships too.

Did you and your best friend meet at work? In the pub? When your cars collided or your train was cancelled? Was it like at first sight or did you think, “I wouldn’t trust that person as far as I could throw them”? What did you bond over? Have you ever fallen out – and if so, how did you patch things up?

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11th April 2023 17:51