The Guardian
Austria v France: Euro 2024 – live

The match report of Belgium 0-1 Slovakia has landed.

Remarkably, this is William Saliba’s first competitive start for France. Didier Deschamps openly questioned the Arsenal centre-back in March: “He is having a good season, but he also does things that I don’t like so much. For France, he has limited game time, but when he plays, that hasn’t necessarily gone well. The hierarchy doesn’t favour him at the moment, but he is here. With certain players, I make sure to persevere, because it can be confidence or little blockages that can shift.”

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17th June 2024 21:49
The Guardian
Iowa presidential poll may contain warning for Biden’s re-election – but it’s still early – live

Fifty percent of Iowa voters who responded to the survey say they will vote for Trump, against 32% who say they’ll support Biden, poll finds

Joe Biden spent the weekend fundraising with his former boss, Barack Obama, and the Hollywood stars who have increasingly lined up behind the Democratic president’s re-election effort. Here’s more, from the Associated Press:

Some of Hollywood’s brightest stars headlined a glitzy fundraiser for President Joe Biden, helping raise what his re-election campaign said was a record $30m-plus and hoping to energize would-be supporters for a November election that they argued was among the most important in the nation’s history.

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17th June 2024 21:46
The Guardian
EU heads gather to discuss new leadership after far-right election successes – Europe live

The 27 heads of state and government meet for the first time since European elections and Macron’s decision to call snap vote in France

Donald Tusk said he is “very satisfied with the current cooperation with the president of the European Commission, as she fully understands the fundamental issues for Poland.”

Donald Tusk, the Polish prime minister, has endorsed Kaja Kallas, who is a contender to become the bloc’s next high representative for foreign affairs.

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17th June 2024 21:46
The Guardian
Megachurch pastor and former Trump spiritual adviser admits sexual abuse

Robert Morris responds to claim by Oklahoma woman that he sexually abused her in 1980s when she was aged 12 to 16

A Texas evangelical pastor and former spiritual adviser to Donald Trump has confessed to sexually assaulting a young girl in his past.

Robert Morris, a founding pastor of Dallas-based Gateway megachurch, was accused by an Oklahoma woman of sexual abuse in the 1980s, beginning when she was 12 and continuing until the age of 16.

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17th June 2024 21:43
The Guardian
Dance music producer Dario G known for No 2 hit Sunchyme dies at 53

The musician, whose real name was Paul Spencer, was diagnosed with stage four rectal cancer in 2023

Paul Spencer, the dance music producer known as Dario G, has died at the age of 53.

The musician was diagnosed with stage four rectal cancer in 2023 and regularly posted about his condition on social media.

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17th June 2024 21:19
The Guardian
Nearly a century-old, Gold Rush-era California hotel destroyed by fire

Hotel Marysville was renowned for its floating dance floor and once hosted stars such as Babe Ruth and Bing Crosby

An almost century-old historic hotel in northern California that once hosted Babe Ruth and Bing Crosby was destroyed by a fire over the weekend.

Crews responded to Hotel Marysville around 10pm on Saturday night and tried to save the long-vacant 98-year-old inn, but the flames burned away the building’s internal components and left only a “skeleton”, Kyle Heggstrom, the Marysville fire chief, told the Sacramento Bee.

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17th June 2024 21:02
The Guardian
Brooklyn’s ‘bling bishop’ sentenced to nine years for defrauding parishioner

Lamor Whitehead accused of conning woman out of her life savings and then spending the money on luxury goods

Brooklyn’s “bling bishop” Lamor Whitehead, sometimes described as a mentor to New York’s mayor, Eric Adams, has been sentenced to nine years in prison for defrauding a parishioner’s mother out of her life savings and other scams.

The Manhattan federal court judge Lorna Schofield handed down the sentence to Whitehead on Monday, three months after he was convicted of wire fraud, attempted extortion and lying to the FBI.

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17th June 2024 20:26
The Guardian
Ivan Schranz earns Slovakia shock win as Belgium are twice denied by VAR

Piece by piece the gilt is flaking off what’s left of Belgium’s golden generation. An abundance of talent, sometimes functioning, sometimes not, but a team without cohesion or an abiding idea, they were picked off by an unheralded Slovakia side who had everything their lustrous opponents did not. But boy, a fair amount happened along the way.

An unerring finish by Ivan Schranz after a defensive aberration was the decisive moment in the match and came after just six minutes. Just as notable were the moments of inaccuracy that piled up for Belgium and, in particular, on the broad shoulders of Romelu Lukaku. The Belgian No 9, wearing No 10, missed enough chances for two hat-tricks and had not one but two goals disallowed.

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17th June 2024 20:21
The Guardian
Row as Nato chief hints at talks to increase availability of nuclear weapons

Jens Stoltenberg accused of ‘escalation of tension’ as he warns of growing threat from Russia and China

The Nato secretary general, Jens Stoltenberg, has indicated that the military alliance is considering whether to increase the number of available nuclear weapons, triggering warnings from experts about the possibility of a new arms race.

Stoltenberg said Nato could, for the first time, face a significant nuclear threat from two fronts – Russia and China – and that it may be necessary to increase the number of deployable warheads as a deterrent.

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17th June 2024 20:14
The Guardian
Stanford disappoints critics of fossil fuel donations by hiring PR firm with big oil ties

University hires Brunswick Group amid anger from campus organizers at its sustainability school’s funding

Stanford University’s sustainability school has hired a public relations firm to address “potential reputational challenges” amid concern from campus activists over the institution’s extensive ties with fossil fuel companies.

However, that PR firm, the Brunswick Group, has itself faced criticism for working with oil and gas companies, disappointing the university’s climate advocates. Brunswick says it is “vital to engage with companies in the most complex sectors to decarbonize”.

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17th June 2024 20:13
The Guardian
German prosecutors announce country’s biggest ever seizure of cocaine

Tip-off from Colombian authorities led to haul of 35.5 tonnes worth £2.2bn hidden among fruit and vegatables

German prosecutors have announced the seizure of cocaine worth €2.6bn (£2.2bn) from several container ships and the arrest of seven people in what they called the biggest ever cocaine find in the country.

Prosecutors in the western city of Düsseldorf said on Monday that they confiscated the 35.5 tonnes of cocaine last year after a tipoff from Colombian authorities. They found 25 tonnes of cocaine at the port in the northern city of Hamburg, another 8 tonnes in the Dutch port of Rotterdam and almost 3 tonnes in Colombia. The drugs were hidden among vegetables and fruit.

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17th June 2024 20:05
The Guardian
Brief encounters: short shorts in the spotlight at Gucci menswear show

On the front row Paul Mescal wore a striped cotton pair that at first glance could have been mistaken for boxers

Gird your loins. The main missive from the Gucci menswear show in Milan on Monday afternoon was that short shorts are sliding up the style charts for summer. Out of 46 of the looks shown, 41 featured shorts hovering around the 3in and 5in inseam mark. One model’s look even consisted of just a pair of slick leather shorts in Gucci’s signature “Ancora Rosso” oxblood colour. On the front row, the Irish actor Paul Mescal added to the mood wearing a softly striped cotton pair from the brand that at first glance could have been mistaken for boxers.

While Mescal was named an official ambassador for the Italian brand last October, he has also become the unofficial face/legs of the short shorts trend. He was one of the first to thrust micro shorts into the spotlight when he was pictured circa 2020 in a pair from his local GAA team (Gaelic Athletic Association), an Irish sporting organisation that Mescal previously played football for. Since then “thigh guy summer” has become a popular hashtag on social media and now Gucci has elevated the trend to high fashion.

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17th June 2024 19:49
The Guardian
New York military veteran comes out in obituary: ‘I was gay all my life’

Colonel Edward Thomas Ryan, who died at age 85, will be buried next to his life partner Paul Cavagnaro

A US military veteran who died earlier this month came out as gay in an obituary published after his death.

The obituary in the Albany Times-Union tells the story of Colonel Edward Thomas Ryan, a decorated army officer who served in the Vietnam war and was also a fireman in his hometown, Rensselaer, New York. He died on 1 June at the age 85.

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17th June 2024 19:29
The Guardian
National Rally says it would privatise French public TV if it wins majority

Far-right party says move would free up €3bn and that public television and radio need ‘a bit of liberty’

Marine Le Pen’s far-right National Rally intends to privatise public television and radio if it wins an absolute majority in the French parliament in snap elections, senior party figures have confirmed.

Jordan Bardella, the party president, told France 3 public television on Sunday that his ambition was to privatise state broadcasting “in order to save money”.

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17th June 2024 19:20
The Guardian
Don’t vote for the far right, French sports stars urge public

Kylian Mbappé and Marion Bartoli among athletes criticised by rightwing politicians for intervening

More than 200 French athletes and sporting personalities have signed an open letter calling on voters to reject the far right in the snap parliamentary election called by Emmanuel Macron, describing it as “not only … a civic duty, but also an act of love for our country”.

As the official election campaign kicked off with just two weeks to go before the first round of voting, the appeal called for “a more inclusive and democratic society” and accused rightwing politicians of exploiting differences and diversity and “manipulating our fears to divide us”.

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17th June 2024 19:05
The Guardian
Election Extra: Farage’s five-year plan – podcast

Nigel Farage has launched Reform UK’s ‘contract’ with voters, which he insists is not a manifesto. Archie Bland reports on its content and whether it adds up

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17th June 2024 19:03
The Guardian
Vladimir Putin to visit North Korea as he seeks further military support

Russian leader will have talks with Kim Jong-un with shared aim of expanding security and economic cooperation

Vladimir Putin will travel to North Korea this week as he seeks continued military support for the Kremlin’s war in Ukraine from one of the world’s most isolated nations.

In his first visit to North Korea since 2000, Putin will meet Kim Jong-un for one-on-one talks in Pyongyang as the two leaders pledge to expand their security and economic cooperation in defiance of western sanctions against both countries.

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17th June 2024 18:51
The Guardian
Netanyahu’s ‘war cabinet’ had little power – but its demise does him real damage | Alon Pinkas

It represented a forum he could conveniently castigate when things went wrong. Now the blame can only go in one direction

There is very little drama in Netanyahu’s decision, or rather bland and laconic statement that he is dissolving the “war cabinet” that he himself formed on 11 October 2023. Constitutionally and in terms of affecting policy, the decision is a Seinfeld decision: it’s about nothing. The constitutionally authoritative body – the one with real power – is the security cabinet. The war cabinet was a convenient and circumstantial political invention. But Netanyahu rival Benny Gantz’s recent withdrawal from the government made the forum redundant in terms of policymaking, and politically explosive, since the extreme rightwing ministers now demanded to join.

The dissolution of the war cabinet looks like an important development. It isn’t. Had Winston Churchill dissolved his war cabinet in January 1941, eight months after he assembled it in May 1940, that would have been significant. This is not the same. Churchill’s war cabinet, as Neville Chamberlain’s before him in 1939, or even David Lloyd George’s war cabinet during the first world war in 1917, then called the war policy committee, had clearly defined constitutional and statutory powers and authority. The war cabinet that Netanyahu formed in the panic, disarray and disorientation that ensued in the days after 7 October patently lacked those constitutional powers.

Alon Pinkas served as Israel’s consul general in New York from 2000 to 2004. He is now a columnist for Haaretz

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17th June 2024 18:39
The Guardian
Blumhouse comes to video games with six different indie horror projects

In LA last week, horror production company Blumhouse announced that it was entering the video game market with its indie horror label Blumhouse Games. Jason Blum, Louise Blain and Zach Wood discuss its approach

A new indie video game publisher made its debut in Los Angeles last week: Blumhouse Games, a division of the horror movie production company co-founded by director Jason Blum in 2000. Unsurprisingly, its specialty will be horror. During the livestreamed Summer Game Fest showcase, Blum and creative lead Louise Blain announced a slate of six experimental horror games, the first of which, Fear the Spotlight, will launch later this year.

Blum described the games label as “going back to our roots, with a focus on indie horror, pushing boundaries and elevating new, original stories”. Like the company’s movies, from Paranormal Activity to M3GAN, its games are all low-budget productions with interesting ideas. The slate includes Project C, a new project from the creators of the brilliant and unusual cine-game Immortality; Grave Seasons, a farming-life game where one of the townspeople is a serial murderer; and Fear the Spotlight, a 90s-styled low-poly horror game about two teenaged girls and a seance gone awry, made by a two-person husband-and-wife team.

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17th June 2024 18:30
The Guardian
Why is Trump cozying up to America’s most powerful business leaders? | Robert Reich

Stocks are at near record levels. That’s not enough for some corporate CEOs, who want more giant tax cuts

The Business Roundtable is an association of more than 200 CEOs of America’s biggest corporations. It likes to think of itself as socially responsible.

Last Wednesday, its chair, Joshua Bolten, told reporters that his group planned to drop “eight figures” while “putting its full weight behind protecting and strengthening tax reform”.

Robert Reich, a former US secretary of labor, is a professor of public policy at the University of California, Berkeley, and the author of Saving Capitalism: For the Many, Not the Few and The Common Good. His newest book, The System: Who Rigged It, How We Fix It, is out now. He is a Guardian US columnist. His newsletter is at robertreich.substack.com

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17th June 2024 18:22
The Guardian
West Ham make contact over Ryan Sessegnon signing after he leaves Spurs

  • Left-back also of interest to his former club Fulham
  • West Ham need to be convinced he is over fitness issues

West Ham are mulling over whether to push ahead with a move for the former Tottenham left-back Ryan Sessegnon on a free transfer.

Sessegnon, a free agent after being released by Spurs, is looking for a new opportunity after a difficult spell with injuries. Fulham are interested in a reunion with the 24-year-old and there has also been initial contact from the Hammers.

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17th June 2024 18:19
The Guardian
Rory McIlroy faces huge challenge to overcome major US Open heartbreak | Ewan Murray

Painful near miss at Pinehurst after letting a two-shot lead late in the final round slip away could take a while to recover from

Amid the grumbling at Rory McIlroy’s sharp exit from the US Open, it is worth remembering that a picture can tell a thousand words. The scale of McIlroy’s devastation was so stark that it looked possible he could throw up all over the scoring area in which he was standing as Bryson DeChambeau holed out for victory at Pinehurst. Anyone who questions the extent to which McIlroy cares about his professional pursuits need only have looked at his face.

Even for those with a loose attachment to his career, the denouement to the 124th US Open was gut-wrenching to watch. This was a loss so sore that McIlroy felt unable to detail his thoughts to the wider world. He should be given a pass there; not only is the Northern Irishman generous with his time to the media, it seems impossible he could have adequately articulated what heartbreak had transpired over the previous hour. McIlroy didn’t hang about, either, for the cheesy shaking of DeChambeau’s hand in front of cameras. This is a sportsman who had the ending of a painful, apparently interminable run within his grasp and cracked. No wonder McIlroy wanted off the property as quickly as possible. Golf’s pals act is contrived nonsense anyway. McIlroy could have offered platitudes to DeChambeau so everybody could say what a wonderful guy he is but this would belie raw emotion.

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17th June 2024 18:15
The Guardian
Inside Out 2: Joy v Anxiety, puberty, and the big secret – discuss with spoilers

Riley returns with new emotions and new concepts. Does it have the same impact as the first film? Is it an accurate portrayal of adolescence? And where’s Bing Bong?

• This article contains spoilers for Inside Out and Inside Out 2

Inside Out 2 has far exceeded expectations at the box office over the weekend, shattering records and massively boosting morale across the film industry. So, we know a lot of people went to see it, and that a lot of them in the US liked it (it got an A grade from CinemaScore, which tracks exiting punters’ reactions).

The elephant in the room is that the original Inside Out was a masterpiece. A best-part-of-a-decade-in-the-making masterpiece: immaculately structured, insightful, tight, funny and very moving. Matching that is an almost impossible task – right? We want your thoughts on how the new movie measures up to the old, and stands on its own terms.

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17th June 2024 17:44
The Guardian
Men should heed female hillwalkers’ safety concerns, says climbing expert

List of ‘horror stories’ highlights need to respect women’s personal space and avoid patronising questions

Male mountaineers should be more mindful of women’s concerns about their personal safety in remote areas and avoid patronising them by questioning their map-reading abilities, a climbing expert has said.

The advice comes in response to female hillwalkers and mountaineers saying sceptical attitudes towards their skills and unwanted attention are discouraging women from taking up the sport.

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17th June 2024 17:40
The Guardian
What does Steve Coogan’s Lost King case mean for future biopics?

The appetite for drama based on real events seems insatiable, but a preliminary ruling that a British film defamed the original of one of its characters – along with legal action against Baby Reindeer – may give producers pause for thought

It’s enough to chill the blood of screenwriters, directors and producers everywhere – or at least provoke a wince of recognition, whether they are in UK legal jurisdiction or not. In a preliminary ruling, a British judge has ruled that the The Lost King, the film about the discovery in 2012 of Richard III’s remains in a Leicester car park, has a case to answer that it is defamatory of Richard Taylor, a former university official.

The Lost King covers the efforts spearheaded by Philippa Langley (played by Sally Hawkins) to uncover Richard III’s skeleton, and Lee Ingleby plays Taylor, the then deputy registrar of Leicester university. Taylor claims the film shows him “behaving abominably” and shows him taking credit for the discovery for himself and the university.

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17th June 2024 17:38
The Guardian
Now we know Farage and Reform’s so-called policies. The worst thing Sunak can do is copy them | Simon Jenkins

Voters will see through the thin prospectus Farage offered today. And pandering to his ideas won’t end well for the Conservatives

Smash him. Go for the jugular. Take the gloves off and hit him with the big one. We have nothing to lose. A sure sign of political panic is when the kids in the backroom take control of tactics and use the language of the big fight.

But who is it that Rishi Sunak is reportedly being advised to smash? The gossip from anonymous “advisers” is that he should get nasty with Keir Starmer. They have been impressed by how unsettled Starmer was by an interviewer reminding him of his support for his predecessor as Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, in 2019. And Sunak is also now threatened by the ghostly voice of Brexit, Nigel Farage, reincarnated as the leader of Reform.

Simon Jenkins is a Guardian columnist

Guardian Newsroom: Election results special. Join Gaby Hinsliff, John Crace, Hugh Muir, Jonathan Freedland and Zoe Williams on 5 July

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17th June 2024 17:15
The Guardian
EU passes law to restore 20% of bloc’s land and sea by end of decade

Narrow vote causes fury in Vienna where climate minister is threatened with legal action by coalition partners

The EU has passed a landmark law to protect nature after a knife-edge vote, ending a months-long deadlock among member states spooked by fierce protests from farmers.

But a last-minute change of heart by Austria’s Green climate minister, whose vote is credited with saving the proposal, led to fury in Vienna, with the party of the chancellor, Karl Nehammer, announcing it would seek criminal charges against her for alleged abuse of power.

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17th June 2024 17:09
The Guardian
Stanciu stunner leads Romania to dominant victory against Ukraine

Thirty years ago, when they could claim briefly to be among the world’s best teams, Romania captured hearts with their eye for the spectacular. It glinted again to devastating effect in their return to major tournament football and, even if this side cannot compare technically to the class of 1994, a performance of genuine ­quality suggested the modern breed can create their own legends.

Ukraine did not know what had hit them. They ran into a brick wall for nearly half an hour before ­Nicolae Stanciu, with a demonstration of ­stupendous ­technique, transformed the picture. It was a goal Gheorghe Hagi, who had addressed their horde of yellow-clad fans via the giant screen before kick-off, would have gladly called his own.

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17th June 2024 17:08
The Guardian
Geriatric millionaires: why boomers keep getting wealthier

The older generation now accounts for half the combined net worth of the US – and in the UK they hold 78% of the UK’s private housing wealth

Name: Geriatric millionaires

Age: 61.

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17th June 2024 17:03
The Guardian
How I created a single-parent support network: ‘You never stop relying on the village’

From weekly dinners to clothing swaps, communal housing to carpooling, creating your own community is key to making child-rearing on your own cost-effective and fun

When I became a single parent of a preschool-aged child, I quickly discovered the best way to look after my son and myself was to build community with other single parents. I had just returned to Brisbane after a decade abroad and suddenly found myself without a job, a car or indeed a partner, and few family and friends living nearby.

Eight years on, I’m now part of an informal economy that shares childcare, school supplies, clothing, meals, days out and even holidays. It may take a village, but the village has saved me money, time and, on more than one occasion, my sanity.

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17th June 2024 17:00
The Guardian
Spanish drivers hired to deliver Amazon parcels in UK take legal action over pay

Exclusive: Some of the drivers say they were not paid in full and in some cases billed thousands for vehicle damage

A group of drivers hired in Spain and brought to the UK to deliver Amazon packages to British households in the run-up to Christmas are taking legal action against the company and one of its subcontractors.

The drivers claim the subcontractor promised them earnings of more than £100 a day, free housing, van rental, insurance and free return flights via an online meeting in Spanish.

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17th June 2024 17:00
The Guardian
Greek island searches for missing tourists intensify amid hiking deaths

Six holidaymakers reported dead or missing in nine days as ‘abnormally hot’ weather hits Mediterranean

Search operations to find three missing tourists on two Greek islands have intensified after police announced that two holidaymakers had been found dead on other islands over the weekend.

Rescue teams supported by sniffer dogs, helicopters and drones have been scouring the Cycladic islands of Sikinos and Amorgos for two French women and an American man who went missing last week.

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17th June 2024 16:52
The Guardian
I was the first Muslim leader of a western democracy. And I say Islamophobia has poisoned our politics | Humza Yousaf

Anti-Muslim sentiment is so mainstreamed now that politicians like Suella Braverman barely bother disguising it

  • Humza Yousaf is a former first minister of Scotland and leader of the Scottish National party

While many in the world rightly bemoan the rise of populism, few are willing to confront the fact that it is the hatred of Muslims that is driving populism in Europe and the west.

In 2024, almost half the world’s population will take part in elections. Many countries have already gone to the polls, and in a number of countries, particularly across Europe, the biggest gains have been made by those who make a living out of vilifying Muslims.

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17th June 2024 16:41
The Guardian
Politics Weekly Westminster: Reform’s threat to the Conservatives – podcast

The Guardian’s Pippa Crerar and Kiran Stacey look ahead to Reform UK’s manifesto launch and why Nigel Farage might be spooking the Conservatives

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17th June 2024 16:41
The Guardian
‘I was totally devastated’: readers on their saddest movie deaths

After Guardian writers shared their most affecting big screen deaths, you responded with yours, from Leon to Aftersun

Major spoilers ahead

Technically he doesn’t die, but for all intents and purposes, in the context of the film, he does. Him pleading and trying to reason not to be turned off and expressing his fear is quite affecting. Nicens_boi

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17th June 2024 16:41
The Guardian
At least 11 dead and dozens missing in two Mediterranean shipwrecks

Rescuers near Italy report 10 bodies found on wooden boat and 66 missing in a separate incident off Calabria

At least 11 people have died and dozens are missing after two separate shipwrecks close to the Italian coast, rescuers said.

Ten bodies were found on Monday in the lower deck of a wooden boat in the central Mediterranean by rescuers from Nadir, a ship operated by the German charity ResQship. The charity said it saved 51 people who were onboard the sinking vessel, which is believed to have departed from Tunisia.

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17th June 2024 16:36
The Guardian
Benjamin Netanyahu dissolves Israeli war cabinet

Move is apparent rebuff to far right and attempt to tighten grip on decision-making over Hamas and Hezbollah

Benjamin Netanyahu has dissolved the Israeli war cabinet that had been overseeing the conflict in Gaza, rebuffing his far-right allies who had been seeking seats, and apparently moving to solidify his grasp on decision-making over the fighting with Hamas in Gaza and Hezbollah across the Lebanese border.

The prime minister announced the move to ministers, saying the war cabinet had been established as part of an agreement in which the moderate politician Benny Gantz and his National Unity party joined an emergency coalition last year.

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17th June 2024 16:26
The Guardian
England supporters’ group calls for urgent review after fans left stranded

  • Fans waited three hours in Gelsenkirchen after victory
  • Uefa urged to guarantee sufficient transport for matches

The official England supporters’ group has called for an “urgent and thorough review” of the arrangements that led to thousands of fans being stranded before and after the fixture against Serbia in Gelsenkirchen on Sunday night.

The Free Lions group described fans being crammed on to trams, forced to walk for miles and stranded in the city some three hours after the final whistle. It said it was “dismayed” and called on Uefa to guarantee sufficient transport arrangements to prevent similar incidents from happening again.

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17th June 2024 16:24
The Guardian
Governor installs crowd control gate on Mount Fuji to limit tourists

Yamanashi prefecture brings in modest hiking fee to stop ‘bullet climbing’ and address safety concerns

A crowd-control gate has been installed halfway up Mount Fuji before the start of this year’s climbing season on 1 July, but the governor of Yamanashi, one of the two prefectures that are home to the mountain, said additional measures were needed to control overcrowding on its lower slopes.

The gate was completed on Monday as part of a set of measures being introduced this year to address growing safety, environmental and overcrowding problems on Japan’s highest and best-known mountain.

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17th June 2024 16:23
The Guardian
Can the USMNT prove they are among the world’s best at Copa América?

The US has a squad full of players from Europe’s top leagues. But Gregg Berhalter’s side have continually struggled against top competition

The theory always was that what the USMNT needed was for more of their players to be playing with the best in Europe. Good, tough, regular competition, proper professional training, exposure to best practice at the highest level the game has ever known. That was what would transform the raw material the US produces into a genuinely top-level side that might be able to compete regularly with the world’s elite. Practice is never that straightforward.

The friendly against Colombia earlier this month was the first time the US had been able to field a starting XI all of whom play in the top flight of the Big Five European leagues (there’s a quibble over whether France can really be included in that grouping or whether Portugal or the Netherlands is more worthy, but let’s go with it for now as a useful shorthand to denote high European level). Was this then to be the breakout, the moment at which the US finally became a major world power in the men’s game?

This is an extract from Soccer with Jonathan Wilson, a weekly look from the Guardian US at the game in Europe and beyond. Subscribe for free here. Have a question for Jonathan? Email [email protected], and he’ll answer the best in a future edition

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17th June 2024 16:21
The Guardian
Eid al-Adha and Gucci: photos of the day – Monday

The Guardian’s picture editors select photographs from around the world

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17th June 2024 16:19
The Guardian
Indoors at breaktime: the school in a London office block

Group that runs Oasis Academy South Bank warns councils prioritise private housing over space for children to breathe

Oasis Academy South Bank in Waterloo sits in a densely built-up corner of south London – so densely that the only space found for the school was in a recommissioned office block. There is no playground, no sports pitch, nowhere to play football at break time.

Steve Chalke is the founder of Oasis Charitable Trust, the organisation that runs the school, one of 54 in their charge across England. He admits it is a challenging environment.

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17th June 2024 16:00
The Guardian
Children facing a ‘brutal’ loss of time and space for play at state schools

Shorter playtimes and shrinking outside space in England have serious implications for children’s wellbeing and mental health

Children are facing a “brutal” loss of space and time for play in school, teachers, unions and academics have warned.

A combination of factors is eating into the time children spend outside, and will have serious implications for their wellbeing and mental health.

A Guardian analysis of the space available to state school children in England has revealed that thousands are attending schools with very little outside space, with government data showing that more than 300 schools have under 1,000 sq metres and at least 20 have no outside space. In nearly 1,000 schools, there is under 10 sq metres for each pupil.

New and unpublished research from the UCL Institute of Education seen by the Guardian showed a continued downward trend in the amount of time children have for playtime in the wake of the Covid lockdowns, with the youngest losing the most time.

The demands of the curriculum have increased, and continue to diminish time outside, while staffing shortages are reducing capacity to oversee playtime.

Across England and Wales schools face difficult financial decisions, which are having an impact on the funding to care for grounds. Headteachers in the state sector have said they are in desperate need of funding to improve basic facilities for children.

School buildings are crumbling, as many were built with Raac (reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete) that was not replaced within its usable lifetime, meaning in some cases playgrounds are being used to host temporary classrooms. This is squeezing out the little space some schools have for children to spend time outside.

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17th June 2024 16:00
The Guardian
Why does Father’s Day always mean more work for mothers? | Zoe Williams

When your kids are small, you can just present them with a card and some felt tips. But when they’re adolescents, everything gets much trickier

It was Father’s Day morning, and my friend and I were comparing notes on whose offspring were the least prepared: if you thought children were useless, may I introduce you to adolescents? “I couldn’t put a card and some felt-tips in front of them,” she said, “they’re teenagers; they’re not nine.” “So have they made cards?” “Nope.” I am expressly forbidden from writing about my daughter, so let’s just square her off with the statement that she is perfect in every way, and her Father’s Day efforts were second to none.

The rest of them, sheesh. My daughter’s best friend said the problem with dads is that they don’t want anything, then amended that to: they either want some speakers for £5,000 or they want a glass of water, there’s nothing in between. Then it hit her that she could get her dad some chocolates. “Does he like chocolate?” I asked, sceptically, because, in my experience, a lot of parents prefer to get their sugar from alcohol. “Everyone likes chocolate,” she said, with unbridled confidence. My son ignored all the helpful links I’d sent him – a plectrum holder in the shape of a tiny guitar; a hat – and said the true gift of Father’s Day was that his dad had grown a whole person to watch the football with. I said, “Oi, I half grew you and football was nowhere in my intentions” and he said: “And yet, here I am, going to watch the football.”

Do you have an opinion on the issues raised in this article? If you would like to submit a response of up to 300 words by email to be considered for publication in our letters section, please click here.

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17th June 2024 15:45
The Guardian
‘Steffi Graf went to see it 12 times!’ How we made rollerskating sensation Starlight Express

‘The German production has had a standing ovation every night for 36 years. Graf went before big tennis competitions to gee herself up. And the German football team would go before an international’

Andrew Lloyd Webber said to me: “I have this story.” It was going to be an animated film based on Thomas the Tank Engine, but animation back in the early 1980s was really expensive, so that never happened. Then we started working on something called Rocky Mountain Railroad. That was going to be a train race across America to see who would have the honour of taking Prince Charles and Diana on a royal tour. There’s history for you. Andrew had a train set in his attic. I’d had one as a boy. It didn’t seem to be a daft idea. The previous show we’d done was people pretending to be cats, so people pretending to be trains wasn’t such a leap.

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17th June 2024 15:40
The Guardian
Three-piece suit or navy normcore? Euros managers’ sartorial statements

Come for the live action, stay for the double-breasted get-up of Poland’s Michal Probierz as football and fashion collide

In the words of Gareth Southgate: “Whenever you put something on, you’re making some sort of a statement,” and it seems the managers currently battling it out at the Euros feel similarly. Because while the high fashion – the catwalk appearances and designer togs – might be reserved for the young-gun players, there has already been a lot to note on the sidelines.

“Football managers are tactical masterminds,” says Daniel-Yaw Miller, sports correspondent at industry publication the Business of Fashion. “There’s not a single element of their preparation that is left to chance – for many of them, that includes their sartorial choices on the touchline. Over the years we’ve seen managers dress in certain ways to communicate their authority and the style of their player management.”

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17th June 2024 15:31
The Guardian
Tongan Olympic kitefoiler JJ Rice dies in diving accident at age of 18

  • US-born teenager was set for sport’s Olympic debut
  • Sister pays tribute to ‘the most amazing brother’

JJ Rice, who had been chosen to represent Tonga at the Paris Olympics, has died in a diving accident. He was 18.

Rice’s father, Darren, confirmed his son’s death on Monday to the Matangi Tonga newspaper.

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17th June 2024 15:17
The Guardian
Washington Post accuses incoming editor of using work of ‘blagger’

Article in US paper claims Robert Winnett, due to join from Telegraph, used material from self-described ‘thief’

The Washington Post has published an investigation that accuses its own future editor of using the work of a self-described blagger who stole private records to order.

Under the headline “Incoming Post editor tied to self-described ‘thief’ who claimed role in his reporting”, the newspaper claimed that Robert Winnett used material from a self-confessed blagger, John Ford, while working as a journalist on the Sunday Times during the 2000s.

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17th June 2024 15:14
The Guardian
Grilled sardines, baked hake, baked haddock: Nigel Slater’s easy fish recipes

The less fuss, the better the result in these simple recipes that make the most of British seafood and seasonal vegetables

When I find beautiful, sparkling fresh fish, I treat it simply, preferring to grill it with a soft herb butter, make a fish sandwich with a soft bap or simply bake it with seasonal vegetables. For seafood, maybe a little cream and herb sauce, but the point is to let the fish and seafood be the star of the show. The less fuss the better, letting its freshness shine through.

Recently, I picked up Scottish haddock and Cornish hake in pristine condition at my local fishmongers and rushed them home for a simple supper. The thick steaks of hake were baked with a sweet-sharp dressing; a bag of cockles were steamed briefly, then tossed with cream, mustard and tarragon; haddock was roasted with tomatoes and peppers. Some fine and rather special halibut ended up with a verdant basil butter.

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17th June 2024 15:00
The Guardian
Millions face record-high temperatures as heat dome intensifies over US

Cities in midwest and north-east brace for heatwave with some to experience highs of 105F – 25 degrees above normal

Extreme heat has begun to hit the US, delivered by a high-pressure weather pattern that the federal weather prediction center says will be “potentially the longest experienced in decades for some locations”.

According to meteorologists with WeatherBELL Analytics, about 265 million people in the US are forecast to see air temperatures reach or exceed 90F (32C), with many of them experiencing heat indices of about 105F by next Sunday.

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17th June 2024 14:48
The Guardian
Doctor Who to Clarkson’s Farm: your best TV of the year so far

You’ve loved Ncuti Gatwa making the Doctor fun again, lapped up the sexiest season of Bridgerton – and discovered the new Mighty Boosh. Here are Guardian readers’ top TV shows of 2024 to date

Prime Video
Clarkson’s Farm is the funniest programme on TV. My father, who was a teacher after the war, always wanted to be a farmer and this is how I think it would have turned out. Clarkson’s ability to strike out on his own, only to be reined in by his more savvy “staff” make this show a joy. The scene with him using a Mr Henry to collect blackberries is only surpassed by it actually working and Kaleb’s visit to Downing Street should have warned us all about the soon-to-be-former prime minister. Nicholas Johnson, Brentford

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17th June 2024 14:25
The Guardian
Coldplay: vinyl copies of new album Moon Music will be made from old plastic bottles

Band say carbon emissions for vinyl production will be reduced by 85% thanks to new method, as they announce 10th studio album

Coldplay are aiming to make the most ecologically sustainable vinyl record yet, for their newly announced album Moon Music.

Each 140g vinyl copy of Moon Music, released 4 October, will be manufactured from nine plastic bottles recovered from consumer waste. For a special “notebook edition”, 70% of the plastic has been intercepted by the environmental nonprofit The Ocean Cleanup from Rio Las Vacas, Guatemala, preventing it from entering the Gulf of Honduras and the Atlantic Ocean.

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17th June 2024 14:12
The Guardian
Wout Weghorst, the Netherlands cult hero, hands Koeman a dilemma

Striker’s winner against Poland continued strong scoring run but can he displace Depay against France?

Nothing Like Oranje is the Netherlands’ strap line and quite frankly there is nobody like Wout Weghorst. When the Dutch team bus departed the Volksparkstadion on the fringes of Hamburg at 6.12pm, victory over Poland safely stowed thanks to his super-sub heroics, there could not have been a more popular passenger on board. Weghorst finished the game very much front and centre. Ronald Koeman’s side got increasingly itchy feet after growing restless in search of a winner but with a single whoosh of the left boot, his first touch two minutes after stepping off the bench, Weghorst earned a 2-1 win to ensure a pitch-perfect start to the tournament.

Quite what Koeman does with Weghorst from here is the intriguing bit. About half an hour after Weghorst left the pitch to a sea of orange shirts singing his name, the Netherlands head coach was fielding questions about whether he would promote the striker to his starting lineup against France in Leipzig on Friday. Could Koeman turn to the Burnley striker from the off in the Group D glamour tie?

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17th June 2024 14:01
The Guardian
Boss of US firm given £4bn in UK Covid contracts accused of squandering millions on jets and properties

Exclusive: Rishi Sunak’s team helped fast-track deal with firm founded by Charles Huang, who says contracts generated $2bn profit

In California, state of sunshine and palm trees, a small group of men are locked in a big legal fight over the money made by a US company selling Covid tests to the British government. The founder of Innova Medical Group says his business collected $2bn (£1.6bn) in profits, one of the largest fortunes banked by any medical supplier during the scramble for lifesaving equipment in the early months of the pandemic.

In a storm of claims and counter-claims, Innova’s boss, Charles Huang, is accused by former associates of “squandering” or moving $1bn of those profits, spending lavishly on luxury aircraft, an $18m house in Los Angeles and “homes for his mistresses”.

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17th June 2024 14:00
The Guardian
Joy for Pixar as Inside Out 2 smashes expectations – and box office records

The sequel to the 2015 hit opened with $155m at the US box office, the best of the year so far, and $140m internationally – the biggest overseas animated opening of all time

Inside Out 2, Pixar’s belated sequel to the 2015 animation about the emotions controlling an 11-year-old girl, has far exceeded ticket sale predictions for its opening weekend. The film, which opened across the world on Friday, had been optimistically tracking to hit $90m (£71m) at the US box office; in fact it hit $155m (£122m).

This makes it not only the highest-performing film of the year so far (leaving Dune: Part Two’s $82.5m (£65m) in the dust) but the first movie since last year’s Barbie ($162m/£127m) to make over $100m on its opening weekend.

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17th June 2024 13:46
The Guardian
Graeme Souness offers positive Alan Hansen health update after chat

  • Hansen ‘sounded fabulous’ during Sunday call, he says
  • ‘He did nothing but take the mickey out of me’

Graeme Souness has provided a positive update on the health of his former Liverpool teammate Alan Hansen. A statement from the club just over a week ago said Hansen was seriously ill in hospital.

Souness, who also played with Hansen for Scotland, told TalkSport: “I spoke to him yesterday and he sounded fabulous so I hope that’s him on the way to a full recovery. I’ve been speaking to his son and Janet, his wife, and I’ve been phoning his phone.

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17th June 2024 13:40
The Guardian
Strong winds hamper crews battling Los Angeles area’s first major fire of the year

The Post fire, which grew to more than 14,600 acres, is one of nearly a dozen wildfires actively burning in California

Firefighters in California are battling blazes in challenging conditions after several wildfires broke out over the weekend, forcing evacuations and consuming thousands of acres of land.

Los Angeles county is dealing with its first major wildfire of the year after a blaze dubbed the Post fire swiftly grew to more than 14,600 acres (5,900 hectares). The fire, which broke out on Saturday, is burning through the mountains along the major Interstate 5 highway, fueled by strong winds that are pushing the flames through dry brush.

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17th June 2024 13:31
The Guardian
‘It can feel like a detective story’: birders asked to help find 126 ‘lost’ bird species

The birds have not been seen for at least a decade – some for more than 100 years – but the authors of a new list of missing species have not given up hope

The coppery thorntail and New Caledonian lorikeet are among the 126 birds “lost” to science, having not been seen for a decade or more, according to the most comprehensive list of missing species composed to date.

The new tally is based on millions of records collected by enthusiastic birders and amateur scientists documenting wildlife in some of the planet’s most remote locations. To be part of the dataset, the bird must not have a recorded sighting in at least a decade, and not be assessed as extinct or extinct in the wild by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

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17th June 2024 13:30
The Guardian
The big idea: can you inherit memories from your ancestors?

The science of epigenetics suggests we can pass on trauma – but trust and compassion too

Since the sequencing of the human genome in 2003, genetics has become one of the key frameworks for how we all think about ourselves. From fretting about our health to debating how schools can accommodate non-neurotypical pupils, we reach for the idea that genes deliver answers to intimate questions about people’s outcomes and identities.

Recent research backs this up, showing that complex traits such as temperament, longevity, resilience to mental ill-health and even ideological leanings are all, to some extent, “hardwired”. Environment matters too for these qualities, of course. Our education and life experiences interact with genetic factors to create a fantastically complex matrix of influence.

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17th June 2024 13:30
The Guardian
‘I am their voice now’: the Tanzanian rapper with a mission to spread pride in his own colour

K-Zungu, an up and coming singeli artist with albinism, says he was lucky to have a protective family because so many with the condition in Africa have not been so fortunate

  • Words and photographs by Diego Menjíbar Reynés in Dar es Salaam

Every day during school break, Ramadhani Idrisa Muhando and his friends would turn on their radio to listen to 20 Percent or Jose Chameleone, stars of bongo flava, a Tanzanian music genre influenced by hip-hop and R&B.

So his love of music, he says, “has its roots in that schoolyard” in Tanga, on Tanzania’s east coast, but it was singeli, a style developed 125 miles away in Dar es Salaam, that changed the course of his life.

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17th June 2024 13:00
The Guardian
Wild ting: why a chattel house now sits on a manicured Scottish lawn

Two years in the making, and drawing on themes of healing, the slave trade and even Vikings, the latest show by Alberta Whittle, who represented Scotland at Venice, has taken over a grand mansion on a holiday isle

On the sweeping manicured grounds of Mount Stuart, a neo-gothic stately home on the Scottish Isle of Bute, sits a most incongruous sight: a bright yellow and green Caribbean chattel house. It’s the creation of Barbadian-Scottish artist Alberta Whittle, who had originally planned to build a bothy to welcome visitors, recognising that the imposing mansion could pose a barrier.

However, the structure ended up becoming an amalgam of a bothy and chattel house, reflecting her dual heritage. “Bothies are gathering spaces of shelter in the Scottish landscape, but I wanted to imbue it with another island’s history of making spaces,” says Glasgow-based Whittle, who represented Scotland at the 2022 Venice Biennale. “The chattel house is an architecture derived from fugitivity – so if you were seen as a troublemaker and the plantation owner wanted you to flee, you could disassemble your home quickly.”

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17th June 2024 12:27
The Guardian
Trump always returns to his folly. And his Republican acolytes always return to him | Richard Wolffe

Trump’s visit to the US Capitol – where the Republicans he almost got killed three years ago fawned over him – would be funny if it weren’t pathetic

Anyone can rat, as Winston Churchill once supposedly said. But it takes a certain amount of ingenuity to re-rat.

Say what you like about Donald Trump, but there’s no shortage of rodent-like ingenuity around his dealings with the sewer life that populates today’s Republican party.

Richard Wolffe is a Guardian US columnist

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17th June 2024 12:01
The Guardian
Rachel Roddy’s recipe for ciambotta, or braised peppers, tomatoes and potatoes | A kitchen in Rome

A southern Italian summer stew of tomatoes and peppers like a ratatouille – serve with pasta, fried eggs or cheese

As I’ve mentioned before, our cooker is a 1972 GasFire Cucina 800. It’s the four-burner version of the five-burner model pictured in Sophia Loren’s book, In the Kitchen with Love, published in 1972, which just happens to be the year I was born, meaning that Sophia and I, our cookers, cooking and books are inextricably linked. However, her larger model had a different arrangement of burners, as well as a protective lip for a thermostat, while mine has a full hinged lid, which protects the wall; being white, it is also a canvas for splatters, meaning Sophia and I are not linked in wiping.

Tomato is the worst, and the best, especially when the sauce is simmering nicely: mostly steady, but every now and then erupting into a burp of a bubble that splatters like a crime scene waiting for pattern analysis. Today, there were also peppers and potatoes in what can only be described as a staggered recipe that demands the lid is on and off, causing fluctuating temperatures that invite splatters. It is worth it, though, for this almost velvety, summer braise, and also because I suggest making a double quantity, half to go with pasta, and the rest with fried eggs or slices of feta.

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17th June 2024 12:00
The Guardian
The pet I’ll never forget: Chocolate and Smudge, the guinea pigs I hoped would be my for ever friends

It took months of pestering my parents before I was able to bring home a pair of furry, friendly rodents. And then, in the blink of an eye, they were gone

They say losing a pet is a good way for a child to learn about grief, but boy did I get the lesson quickly. Less than six months after my parents brought the guinea pigs home, they had the tough task of delivering me the news. “But they were here when I left,” I said after I arrived home from a school trip to France when I was 11. “How could it have happened so fast?”

It turned out that poor, sweet Chocolate and Smudge had been left outside too long on a blisteringly hot day and suffered a serious case of heatstroke. I was furious: with my mum and dad; with myself, for abandoning them in favour of my own enjoyment abroad; and even with them, for being too weak to enjoy an afternoon of nice weather. “I don’t understand,” I repeated, again and again. Just a week before, they had been so healthy.

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17th June 2024 12:00
The Guardian
Angry? Disappointed? Heartbroken? Think twice before you call the feelings police

Faced with ‘bad’ emotions, it’s natural to want to lock them up. As a therapist and a patient, I’ve learned to let them run

Not so long ago, one of my best friends was sitting at my kitchen table, crying. He and his partner had just broken up, and I could feel his desperate sadness and the crushing weight of grief at losing someone he loved so much. I stood by the counter feeling so helpless. Confronted with his suffering, I was desperate to lift him out of his misery, to tell him that they would get back together, that things would be OK. It felt like an emotional emergency, and I wanted to call in the feelings police to lock his bad feelings up.

One of the hardest things for me to do, when I was training to be a psychotherapist, was to stop trying to make my patients feel better. It is of course a very natural response, if someone we are with is feeling bad, to want to make them feel good. We feel it in our bones – feeling bad is bad, feeling good is good, and we want only good things for those we care for. Emergency! Shut this thing down!

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17th June 2024 12:00
The Guardian
From topping the 90s charts to ‘very controlled and predictable’ today: is the remix dead?

The likes of Fatboy Slim and Armand van Helden remixed original tracks into mutant dancefloor beasts, but thanks to streaming and risk-averse labels, this artform is threatened

Back in the 1990s, the right dance remix could make – or sometimes resurrect – a career. Fatboy Slim’s mix of Cornershop’s Brimful of Asha took a marginal indie band to the top of the British charts, Andrew Weatherall saved Primal Scream from potential obscurity with his remix of their lachrymose ballad I’m Losing More Than I’ll Ever Have (which became Loaded) and Todd Terry’s remix of Everything But the Girl’s Missing gave the band a new lease of life in electronic music.

Kelli Ali says that Armand van Helden’s 1997 remix of Spin Spin Sugar by her former band Sneaker Pimps – a classic of the early UK garage scene – introduced the group’s music to an audience “who were maybe searching for something to listen to outside the club, when the sun came up.” She says: “It meant that our music crossed over to a whole generation of hardcore clubbers. I still have friends saying they were dancing to the track recently, which is pretty epic in terms of longevity for a remix.”

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17th June 2024 11:06
The Guardian
The right’s fury over Caitlin Clark is about everything except Caitlin Clark

Much of the debate around the Indiana Fever rookie is led by politicians who employ discord as a means to posture to voters

When Caitlin Clark was on the receiving end of a hard foul from Angel Reese on Sunday, the sound and fury around the Indiana Fever rookie intensified once again. She has been the focus of a number of controversies lately.

After Clark was left off the USA women’s basketball Olympic team earlier this month, I raised an eyebrow myself. She’s a phenomenal player and athlete and someone who should hold the lion’s share of the credit for the WNBA’s massive increase in popularity. But, as is often the case in sports discourse, multiple things can be true at once. Clark is also an inexperienced rookie, who, aside from a few standout performances (including Sunday’s win over the Chicago Sky), has had a rocky start to her WNBA career – she leads the league in turnovers per game. And when it comes to adding her to the Olympic roster, the US selection committee would have had to alter the roles of skilled guards like Diana Taurasi and Sabrina Ionescu.

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17th June 2024 10:30
The Guardian
Consensus or division? How Modi will manage Indian coalition government

Being beholden to partners could be a necessary restraint on Indian PM – or he could double down on oppressive policies

As Narendra Modi traversed the country during recent months, campaigning for a third term in power, he repeated the same refrain. The past decade “was just a trailer”, the prime minister told crowds, adding: “There is plenty more to come.”

The expectation, among his Bharatiya Janata party (BJP) and most analysts and pollsters, was that India’s election would easily return him to power with the same – if not stronger – supermajority that he has enjoyed over the past decade.

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17th June 2024 09:27
The Guardian
‘We wouldn’t let animals die in misery. Why should humans?’: Susan Hampshire on why dying must be a choice

The actor argues that the law has changed elsewhere; now it’s time for the UK to show compassion

I’ve been campaigning and raising money for assisted dying for decades, but now we have an icon like Esther Rantzen talking about it, suddenly the game has changed. My mother died in 1964 and some time after that I decided to join the Euthanasia Society, which is now called Dignity in Dying. When I looked after my mother-in-law, she was begging to get off the planet but nobody would help her. After that there was my husband Eddie [Kulukundis, theatre and sports philanthropist] who had dementia. He was such a gentle man, a pleasure to look after for 14 years. But 18 months before he met his maker, he said in an aggressive way, which was quite unusual for Eddie, “I just want to die.”

I cared for my two sisters, both of whom lived well until they were 94. But the last five weeks of my sister Anne’s life was horrendous because of how much agony she was in. Every few minutes she was saying, “Please help me. Why can’t they help me to go now? I’m not going to get any better. I have no future. I will never move again. Please.”

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17th June 2024 08:00
The Guardian
Photoespaña: the exhibition where the staging is as impressive as the art

Madrid’s yearly photography festival has shone light on new photographers, established industry names, and artists whose work has gone unrecognised for decades

By the end of September, PhotoEspaña, Madrid’s yearly photography festival, will have hosted more than 80 exhibitions featuring the work of nearly 300 photographers and visual artists. Shows by established figures such as Elliott Erwitt, Paloma Navares, David Goldblatt and Erwin Olaf lead a roster that also includes less familiar names, Lúa Ribeira, the Widline Cadet and Consuelo Kanaga among them.

Above: Erwin Olaf’s Narratives of emancipation, desire and intimacy at Fernan Gomez cultural centre. Photograph: La Fabrica. Right: Boris Savelev’s Viewfinder – A way of looking, at the Serrería Belga. Photograph: Oak Taylor Smith

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17th June 2024 08:00
The Guardian
In it to win it: how to maximise your chances in competitions

Enter lots of contests, think of prizes as potential presents but beware of scammers

Winning a competition can be a great feeling, but businesses don’t give away prizes out of generosity.

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17th June 2024 08:00
The Guardian
Swifties and academics debate Taylor Swift, from misogyny to millipedes

University of Liverpool hosts Tay Day to coincide with singer’s Eras tour concerts at Anfield

It was mid-afternoon in the 600-seat lecture theatre in the Yoko Ono Lennon Centre at the University of Liverpool and the audience was deep into an analysis of sexual racism in Taylor Swift’s music videos.

At the front of the room, blown up on a giant screen, were several screenshots of the singer kissing white men in a variety of music videos, held in contrast with three images of her conspicuously not kissing her black love interests. How much of this is a product of a fundamentally racist society? What is her responsibility as a pop star to fight against society’s evils?

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17th June 2024 07:00
The Guardian
Kenya’s first nuclear plant: why plans face fierce opposition in country’s coastal paradise

Unease and anger are rising over proposals to build country’s first facility on Kilifi coast, home to white sand beaches, coral reefs and mangrove swamps

Kilifi County’s white sandy beaches have made it one of Kenya’s most popular tourist destinations. Hotels and beach bars line the 165 mile-long (265km) coast; fishers supply the district’s restaurants with fresh seafood; and visitors spend their days boating, snorkelling around coral reefs or bird watching in dense mangrove forests.

Soon, this idyllic coastline will host Kenya’s first nuclear plant, as the country, like its east African neighbour Uganda, pushes forward with atomic energy plans.

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17th June 2024 07:00
The Guardian
The man who turned his home into a homeless shelter – podcast

Stuart Potts is an unlikely do-gooder – a former crack addict who has hit rock bottom more than once. But since 2020, he has offered hundreds of homeless people a bed in his small flat – and for many of them, it has been life-changing. By Samira Shackle

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17th June 2024 06:00
The Guardian
Abandoned, abused and belittled: how Oksana Masters survived a torturous childhood – and became a world-beating athlete

Born with disabilities in the shadow of Chornobyl, she spent her early life in an orphanage that was also a brothel. Then Masters was adopted, and thrived, becoming a phenomenal rower, skier and cyclist

You wouldn’t necessarily expect an injury to a finger to derail an entire competition season and threaten to end a sporting career, but this is the situation Oksana Masters, the US Paralympic skier and cyclist, found herself in last year. “I’ve had injuries and I’m used to missing time, but not a whole year like that,” she says. “I underestimated the mental side.” But in a life as traumatic and triumphant as Masters’, a broken finger is just one more obstacle to be overcome.

She was born in Ukraine in 1989, with a range of disabilities caused by radiation from the 1986 Chornobyl nuclear disaster, and spent the first part of her childhood in an orphanage, enduring unimaginable emotional, physical and sexual abuse. When, as an eight-year-old, she was adopted by an American woman, it was finally the start of a happy family life – but it was also challenging to adapt to a new country. Masters underwent multiple operations, including having both her legs amputated.

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17th June 2024 06:00
The Guardian
Tony awards 2024: red carpet looks and best of the show – in pictures

Jeremy Strong, Daniel Radcliffe, Ariana DeBose and Angelina Jolie were among the crowd for the 77th annual Tony awards, held in New York on Sunday

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17th June 2024 05:18
The Guardian
The economy and Labour’s post-election dilemma - podcast

Heather Stewart explains how the party’s central economic message could help it win power but then constrain it in office

Central to Labour’s campaign over the last few weeks has been one key message: that the party, should it win the election on 4 July, will be a force for stability after years of political turmoil.

Keir Starmer’s economic pledges have been aimed to be reassuring and cautious: no big increases in public spending, no big tax rises and a commitment to keep to the current fiscal rules on debt.

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17th June 2024 04:00
The Guardian
England make hard work of Serbia in their Euro 2024 opener – Football Daily

Max Rushden is joined by Barry Glendenning, Lars Sivertsen and Troy Townsend to discuss England’s opening match and more

On the podcast today: England beat Serbia 1-0 with Jude Bellingham’s goal set up by Bukayo Saka. A win is the main thing for England, but there’s plenty to think about for Gareth Southgate.

Elsewhere in Group C, Slovenia and Denmark draw as Erik Janza’s fine finish cancels out Christian Eriksen’s opener, a magical moment three years after his cardiac arrest on the field at the last Euros.

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17th June 2024 02:41
The Guardian
Between hollow rhetoric and war: how sanctions work – and why they often don’t

From ancient Greece to modern Russia, sanctions are now the go-to option for policy-makers – so why do they so rarely achieve their aims?

In the year 432BCE, the Athenian empire sought to teach its smaller neighbour, Megara, a punitive lesson after various acts of defiance. Instead of going to war, which would break the peace with Sparta, Athens took the novel path of blocking the Megarians from using all the ports in the region.

It was known as the Megarian decree, and it was arguably the first recorded case of economic sanctions. It was also a failure, at least when it came to fending off a conflict. The Peloponnesian war, pitting Athens against Sparta, erupted a year later, and some ancient historians believe it was triggered by the Megarian sanctions.

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17th June 2024 01:44
The Guardian
Australia throwing a game is the grim fantasy of conspiracy theorists | Geoff Lemon

The idea any international team would deliberately lose a match is something easily said, and almost impossible to do

For a couple of hours, as the night wore late on the island of Saint Lucia, you could feel it bubbling. In the bars of the Caribbean, spreading through the travelling tourists watching muted televisions. Across the reaches of the internet, slowly because most of the likely candidates were in England asleep, but it was there among the late-night listeners and the expats scattered across time zones. Reflected in the kind of profiles with St George’s Cross emojis in their display names, bristling at the one concern.

Scotland beating Australia would knock England out of the T20 World Cup. Scotland were not supposed to be good enough to beat Australia. But Australia had dropped six catches while Scotland marauded to 92 inside the first nine overs.

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16th June 2024 23:50
The Guardian
Ferrari win back-to-back Le Mans 24 Hours after intense battle with Toyota

  • Fuoco, Molina and Nielsen the winning drivers
  • Runners-up finish just 14 seconds behind

After a relentless battle likely to be remembered for the ages even amid the storied history of this race, ­Ferrari’s victory at the Le Mans 24 Hours must count as one of the team’s hardest fought wins at the Circuit de la Sarthe.

Ultimately it was the No 50 ­Ferrari 499P of Italy’s Antonio Fuoco, Spain’s Miguel Molina and Denmark’s ­Nicklas Nielsen who took the flag in the 92nd Grand Prix d’Endurance, a first ­victory at the 24 for all three drivers, who will remember this day long into their dotage.

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16th June 2024 18:26
The Guardian
‘No pride in occupation’: queer Palestinians on ‘pink-washing’ in Gaza conflict

Israel presents itself as an LGBT haven in the region, but for Palestinians it offers neither refuge nor solidarity

When Daoud, a veteran queer activist, recently walked past rainbow flags hung for Pride month in the old port city of Jaffa, a historic centre of Palestinian culture, he was overcome by a wave of revulsion.

The most famous symbol of LGBTQ+ liberation has been so co-opted by the Israeli state that to a gay Palestinian like him it now serves only as a reminder of the horror unfolding just 60 miles south.

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16th June 2024 12:00
The Guardian
‘People like it because it’s the messy truth’: Lily Allen and Miquita Oliver on their hit podcast Miss Me?

The pop star and the TV presenter are lifelong friends, and it’s their intimacy – and honesty – that gives their new BBC show its edge. They discuss their storied careers, and how they turn life’s challenges into audio gold

In a photographer’s studio in north London, sitting at a wooden table with mugs of tea, two friends are having a chat. They’ve discussed food and clothes, but now they’re on to their actual friendship: the reason why we’re here.

“I think before this podcast,” says Miquita Oliver, “a lot of people who were aware that Lily and me have a friendship would be basing it on pictures of us leaving the Groucho pissed when we were 23…” She looks at Lily Allen, who is laughing quite hard.

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16th June 2024 08:00
The Guardian
‘Painting is dead’: celebrating the 150th anniversary of photography in 1989

Diverse, sensational and featuring ghosts, the earliest pictures were not as we might imagine them

‘From today painting is dead!’ was how French artist Paul Delaroche greeted, horrified, one of the earliest photographs. It wasn’t, but celebrating photography’s 150th anniversary in 1989, the Observer explored how this ‘miraculous new invention’ changed our ways of seeing.

Cartes de visite – among the earliest affordable mass imagery – challenge the cliché of Victorian photography. Rather than a bewhiskered paterfamilias in his Sunday best, rigid and unsmiling as required by long exposures, they display surprising diversity and a taste for sensation. Alexandra, Princess of Wales, gives her daughter a piggyback; a bare-bottomed boy gets smacked; there are giants, severed heads, bearded children, chimney sweeps and celebrities.

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16th June 2024 07:00
The Guardian
Italy rally to beat Albania and are Spain the real deal? – Football Daily

Max Rushden is joined by Barry Glendenning, Nicky Bandini, Dan Bardell and Nick Ames as day two of Euro 2024 provides goals, goals, goals

On the podcast today: Albania provide an early scare against Italy, with Nedim Bajrami scoring after just 23 seconds and setting a record for the quickest ever goal at the Euros. But the defending champions rallied straight away to secure a deserved victory.

Elsewhere in Group B, can we finally say it … are Croatia tired? Spain beat them 3-0 and already look a team to be taken seriously at this tournament.

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16th June 2024 01:10
The Guardian
Potent images that shine a light on domestic abuse – in pictures

Lingchi, or “death by a thousand cuts”, was a particularly brutal form of execution practised in Asia in ancient times: the condemned person was tied to a post and body parts were slowly sliced off one by one. The Indian-born photographer Sujata Setia uses this barbaric practice in her series A Thousand Cuts as a potent metaphor for a different kind of brutality – domestic abuse. In collaboration with the charity Shewise, Setia spent two years photographing survivors of abuse among the UK’s south Asian community. Using saanjhi, the Indian art of paper-cutting, she makes vivid red cuts in her portraits to express her subjects’ anguish: “I wanted to show how the scars are not only external but internal,” she says. Having grown up witnessing domestic violence, Setia initially resisted turning the camera on herself. “But there came a point where I realised I had to own my own scars.” Taking her own portrait and placing it alongside the others in the series has been “absolutely the most healing process,” she says.

• Setia is the winner of the creative category of the Sony world photography awards 2024, professional competition. The 2024 awards book is available to buy at worldphoto.org. In the UK, the national domestic abuse helpline is 0808 2000 247, or visit womensaid.org.uk

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15th June 2024 18:00
The Guardian
‘As their older sister, I feel a responsibility to protect them and be a role model’: Aleesha Coker’s best phone picture

The student on the image she took while working on a series for her photography A-level

Aleesha Coker, then 17, and her two younger sisters, Freda and Bintu, had stopped off at the corner shop for a snack on their way home from school. Coker had been working on a series for her photography A-level, shooting through glass from exterior to interior. As the girls passed by a payphone in Lorrimore Square, south London, Coker was inspired to set up a moment. She used an iPhone 12 set to portrait mode – “I don’t particularly enjoy using film cameras,” she says – and was pleased with how “the muted colours gave it an intimate feeling”.

“As their older sister, I feel a responsibility to protect them and be a role model. Freda is 13. She’s very quiet most of the time, but can be loud when she feels comfortable. Bintu is 10; she has a very bubbly character and can be outspoken. “I don’t think their expressions in the photograph necessarily reflect the excitable parts of their personalities,” she says, “but something deeper. When my little sisters gaze at the camera in this way, I’m reminded of how much they trust me.”

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15th June 2024 11:00
The Guardian
Azeem Rafiq talks racism, cricket, and leaving Britain; Philippa Perry offers advice on a painful crush; why Rory Stewart quit politics; and the big British bamboo crisis – podcast

The former cricketer discusses the ramifications of his decision to speak out about racism at Yorkshire; a reader has developed an intense crush on an unavailable work colleague; Boris Johnson and Brexit weren’t the only reasons Rory Stewart left politics; and Simon Usborne on the destructive impact of bamboo

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15th June 2024 06:00
The Guardian
This Labour city backed Brexit and went Tory: what did it get in return? - video

In the first video of a new series of Anywhere but Westminster, John Harris and John Domokos revisit Stoke-on-Trent, the once-loyal Labour city that went totally Tory in 2019. Has 'levelling up' money made up for swingeing local cuts? Will Labour win again? And what do people working hard to turn the place around think  about the future? 

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14th June 2024 12:48
The Guardian
Will sewage in the Thames hurt the Tories? The view from Henley and Thame – video

In the run-up to July's general election, the Guardian video team is touring the UK looking at the issues that matter to voters. After swimmers and rowers fell sick from sewage discharges into the River Thames we went to the seat of Henley and Thame to see how environmental concerns rank for voters in a seat that has been Conservative for more than 100 years

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11th June 2024 15:58
The Guardian
EU elections fallout: a shock snap vote, resignations and the far right – video report

Emmanuel Macron stunned politicians and the public by announcing a snap general election after the far-right National Rally party won about 32% of the French vote. But it wasn’t just in France that the far right was celebrating. In Germany and Austria, parties on the populist right made stunning gains. Despite that, the pro-European centre appeared to have held in a set of results likely to complicate EU lawmaking

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10th June 2024 18:36
The Guardian
Five young players at Euro 2024 you need to know – video

The Guardian's Jamie Jackson picks five young players to watch at Euro 2024. Jamal Musiala, Armando Broja, Benjamin Sesko, Charles De Ketelaere and Rasmus Højlund have all had success at club level and will bring plenty of experience to the tournament, hoping to drive their countries forward. From height to speed to having the X factor, Jackson explains why these players are ready to make a splash on the international stage

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10th June 2024 18:29
The Guardian
People in France: what are your biggest concerns and current political views?

We’re keen to hear from people in France which political issues they care about the most, and how they’re planning to vote in the French general election

After suffering a crushing defeat at the hands of Marine Le Pen’s far right National Rally (RN) in the European parliamentary elections, French president Emmanuel Macron on Sunday unexpectedly announced a snap general election that will be held within the next 30 days.

We’d like to hear from people in France who are eligible to vote in the upcoming French election which political issues are most important to them today, and how they are planning to vote.

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10th June 2024 12:17
The Guardian
Euro 2024: how well will your team perform at the tournament?

Is your country in good form? What is the mood like at home? Which players should we look out for in Germany?

Are you feeling confident? Euro 2024 begins next Friday night, with Scotland taking on Germany in Munich. The hosts have struggled for consistency over the last few years but, come 14 July, who would be surprised to see them crowned champions of Europe for a record fourth time?

Germany are not the favourites, though. That honour – or burden – belongs to England, with France, Spain and Portugal not too far behind. It’s going to be an intriguing and absorbing month of football.

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6th June 2024 01:00
The Guardian
Exclusive: The Guardian interviews President Zelenskiy

In an exclusive interview with the Guardian, the Ukrainian president, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, revealed the tactics and traits that help him face the daily frustrations of leading a country at war for more than two years.

Within a ceremonial room inside Kyiv’s presidential compound, Zelenskiy spoke for nearly an hour with a Guardian team, including the editor-in-chief, Katharine Viner. The interview took place during perhaps the toughest time for Ukraine since the early days of the war. Russia is on the offensive in Kharkiv, an advance that follows months of delay in the US Congress over the passing of a major support package, limiting Ukraine’s battlefield capabilities

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5th June 2024 11:48
The Guardian
Tell us about your best friend and your favorite things about them

We want to hear about how you and your best friends met and how you became close

There’s no way to say this without sounding overly corny but: friends are the best. Life can be difficult and confusing, but good friends make it feel more manageable.

Friendship has very real health benefits. According to the American Psychological Association, people who have friends and close confidants are “more satisfied with their lives and less likely to suffer from depression”, as well as “less likely to die from all causes, including heart problems”.

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30th May 2024 16:30
The Guardian
The fake news divide: how Modi’s rule is fracturing India – video

Ahead of the election in India, the Guardian’s video team travelled through the country to explore how fake news and censorship might shape the outcome.

Almost one billion people are registered to vote. The country's prime minister, Narendra Modi, has been in power for more than 10 years, and his Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata party (BJP) is seeking a third term.


But critics of Modi and the BJP say his government has become increasingly authoritarian, fracturing the country along religious lines and threatening India’s secular democracy. At the same time, the space for freedom of speech has been shrinking while disinformation and hate speech has exploded on social media.

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30th May 2024 11:31
The Guardian
Old Lesbians: reclaiming old age and queerness through storytelling

From first crush to first love, from the closet to coming out and from loss to connection. For the last 25 years, retired schoolteacher Arden Eversmeyer travelled from Houston across the US to record hundreds of oral 'herstories' from a rapidly disappearing population. Old Lesbians honours Arden’s legacy by animating the resilient, joyful voices she preserved in the Old Lesbian Oral Herstory Project – a powerful reminder of the strength, resilience and unwavering spirit of these remarkable women

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22nd May 2024 15:01
The Guardian
David Copperfield ‘was in my nightmares’: the women alleging sexual misconduct - video

A Guardian US investigation is reporting allegations of sexual misconduct and inappropriate behaviour by illusionist David Copperfield. Testimonies from two women, both of whom are portrayed by actors, describe their alleged experiences and the impact it had on their lives. Copperfield denies all of the allegations and has never been charged with criminal wrongdoing

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16th May 2024 16:22
The Guardian
Four kids left: The Thai school swallowed by the sea – video

Ban Khun Samut Chin, a coastal village in Samut Prakan province, Thailand, has been slowly swallowed by the sea over the past few decades. This has led to the relocation of the school and many homes, resulting in a dwindling population. Currently, there are only four students attending the school, often leaving just one in each classroom. The village has experienced severe coastal erosion, causing 1.1-2km (0.5-1.2 miles) of shoreline to disappear since the mid-1950s

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15th May 2024 12:47