The Guardian
Minister says Liz Truss ‘enjoying’ new policy direction and welfare cuts are needed – UK politics live

Levelling up secretary Simon Clarke says PM is ‘astonishingly resilient’ and will continue to do what ‘she believes is right’

The UK devolved governments have called for an urgent meeting with Kwasi Kwarteng and urged him to “reverse the damage” caused by his tax-cutting mini-budget.

The joint letter from the finance ministers of Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, warns that the chancellor has taken a “huge gamble” on the health of the economy.

We’re calling for this at a time of economic and political crises. We’ve seen economic chaos caused by a mini-budget that has been making our society more unequal.

This is about trying to make our society more equal.

We’ve got the leakiest homes in Europe - losing huge amounts of energy through badly sealed windows and poorly lined walls.

We could be saving hundreds, thousands of pounds through insulation - reducing energy wastage, cutting bills and emissions. It really isn’t rocket science. The cheapest bill is the one you don’t have to pay.

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1st October 2022 13:16
The Guardian
Arsenal v Tottenham: Premier League – live

  • Premier League updates from the 12.30pm BST kick-off
  • Get in touch! You can mail Scott with your thoughts here

Antonio Conte speaks to BT. “In England there are many, many derbies. This is an important derby, but it has to become important for the table, and not only the rivalry. We need to fight for something important in the future. I have picked the formation that is the best start to this run of 13 games.”

Fancy a stroll down Memory Lane N5? A meander along Nostalgia Avenue N17? Let Rob and Simon take you by the hand and lead you through the streets of north London.

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1st October 2022 13:15
The Guardian
Russia-Ukraine war: Ukrainian forces close in on Lyman; head of nuclear plant reported abducted – live

Luhansk governor says Russian troops trapped in Lyman asked commanders if they could retreat but request was turned down

It’s 12pm in Ukraine, here’s the latest:

Ukraine has encircled Russia’s forces around a bastion that is critical for Moscow at the eastern town of Lyman, in an operation that is still under way. Russia’s forces at Lyman totalled about 5,000 to 5,500 soldiers, but the number of encircled troops may have fallen because of casualties and some soldiers trying to break out of the encirclement, according to a spokesperson for Ukraine’s eastern forces.

The Ministry of Defence said Russia’s expansion strategy has resulted in “killing civilians it now claims are its own citizens”.The MoD said Russia is expending “strategically valuable military assets” in attempts to gain tactical advantage.

Ukraine’s president thanked his US counterpart, Joe Biden, on Saturday for signing an additional $12.35 bn (£11bn) in support for Ukraine. Volodymyr Zelenskiy said “This help is more important today than ever.”

The Ukrainian director-general of the Russian-held Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant has been detained by a Russian patrol, according to Energoatom. The company said his detention on Friday “jeopardises the safety of operation of Ukraine and Europe’s largest nuclear power plant.”

Turkey which has been at the centre of mediation between the west and Russia, rejected Russia’s annexation of Ukraine, calling the decision a “grave violation” of international law.

The World Bank said it will provide an additional US$530m in support to Ukraine, bringing the total aid by the bank to $13bn. The aid is supported by the UK ($500m) and Denmark ($30m).

Lyman is important because it is the next step towards the liberation of the Ukrainian Donbas. It is an opportunity to go further to Kreminna and Sievierodonetsk, and it is psychologically very important.

The occupiers trapped in Liman asked the Russian command to allow them to leave the city, but were refused.

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1st October 2022 13:07
The Guardian
Meera Sodha’s vegan recipe for beer-battered aubergine tacos | The new vegan

Aubergines fried until crisp on the outside and gooey inside, then stuffed into tacos with salsa, pickled red cabbage and vegan creme fraiche

When I first ate a Baja-style fish taco in San Francisco, I may have squealed. It tasted as if that ultimate British food icon, battered cod, had sacked off its old friend chips, and was living a brand new American life with new friends: lime, salsa, taco and crema. I loved it, not especially for the fish, but for the contrast within a single bite, which was hot, cold, crunchy, soft and sweet-and-sour. Here, in place of the fish, I’ve used my beloved aubergine, which, when fried, takes on a dual personality of being crisp on the outside and gooey within, and marries perfectly with all the other elements.

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1st October 2022 13:00
The Guardian
Standup Jim Gaffigan: ‘I never wanted to do us-and-them comedy’

The Grammy-nominated US comedian with a nice-guy reputation has warmed up for the pope and doesn’t swear on stage. But since he called out Trump on Twitter, are we seeing a new, spikier side to the ‘king of clean’?

When I first wrote about Jim Gaffigan, on his visit to the UK in 2017, I asked: “Is this America’s Michael McIntyre?” OK, so the Indiana man is bluer of collar, and rather less gigglesome. But he was, like the Englishman, a purveyor of fun-for-all-the-family observational comedy, inhabiting that territory where funny foodstuffs, marital scrapes and pesky kids meet, and from which politics and rude words have made themselves scarce. Here was an act – known as “the king of clean” – who opened for the pope in Philadelphia before a million-strong audience, whose albums topped the Billboard comedy chart and secured six Grammy nominations, and who reigned supreme at standup comedy without ruffling any feathers whatsoever.

Suffice to say, when Gaffigan visits again this autumn, no one will be comparing him to McIntyre. On 28 August 2020, “it finally happened”, in the words of one askance US news report at the time: “Donald Trump broke the world’s nicest man.” The lifelong noncontroversialist Gaffigan had launched an extraordinary Twitter tirade against the then president, hot on the heels of that year’s Republican National Convention. Addressing his 3 million followers, from all sides of the political spectrum, he called Trump “a traitor and a con man who doesn’t care about you. Deep down you know it.” The president was “a liar, a criminal [and] a fascist who has no belief in law.” Gaffigan-watchers couldn’t believe what they were reading. Some predicted a career implosion. Gaffigan followed up with an explanatory Facebook post three days later, sarcastically titled What I’ve Learned Since I Lost My Mind.

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1st October 2022 13:00
The Guardian
Horner threatens legal action as row over F1 budget cap claims escalates

  • Red Bull boss has accused Toto Wolff of ‘defamatory claims’
  • Cheat row overshadowing this weekend’s Singapore GP

The Red Bull principal Christian Horner has accused rival Toto Wolff of “hugely defamatory, fictitious claims” and threatened legal action against Mercedes amid the cheat row overshadowing this weekend’s Singapore Grand Prix.

In a fiery, and tense press conference on Saturday, Horner insisted he is “absolutely confident” Red Bull did not overspend as Max Verstappen beat Lewis Hamilton to last year’s controversial championship. Horner also suggested the accusations that Red Bull broke F1’s budget cap have been planted to take the spotlight away from Verstappen, who could claim his second title in as many seasons on Sunday.

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1st October 2022 12:42
The Guardian
To understand the scale of the climate emergency, look at hurricanes | Peter Kalmus

Climate breakdown is far more intense in 2022 than even many scientists expected, yet the world still isn’t treating this like a crisis

I became a climate activist 16 years ago. Back then, not many people cared about climate change. The eye rolls were audible. Media coverage was scarce, and what little there was glibly included “both sides”. It was frustrating and tragic to see such a clear and present danger and to know that it was still mostly avoidable, yet ignored by society.

I assumed that intensifying, in-your-face climate disasters would serve as a sort of backstop to finally force action. I even hoped that humanity would listen to scientists and start acting before things got that bad. I didn’t think this was too much to expect; after all, the scientific fundamentals are easy enough to grasp.

Peter Kalmus is a climate scientist and author of Being the Change: Live Well and Spark a Climate Revolution

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1st October 2022 12:16
The Guardian
People thought Corbyn and I would crash the pound. The real risk was Truss and her fanatics | John McDonnell

We knew the markets would react sharply to us and were prepared for that. These free-market zealots had no plan at all

Watching the events since the introduction of the “Not a Budget”, I have sat with my head in my hands. You could almost weep for the lasting consequences of this show of arrogance, ideological obstinacy and incompetence. People’s homes, pensions and the public services they rely upon are all now at serious risk. It’s hard to comprehend just how badly they misjudged the situation and how little they prepared for taking over the highest offices of state.

In his brilliant book The Great Crash, 1929, the economist JK Galbraith advises that to avoid a crash in the future you should put in place a vast range of institutional protections, but that the most important protection is memory.

John McDonnell has been the Labour MP for Hayes and Harlington since 1997. He was shadow chancellor from 2015 to 2020

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1st October 2022 12:00
The Guardian
Original Observer photography

From fishing with Kerridge to Theroux in Cape Cod – the best original photographs from the Observer commissioned in September 2022

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1st October 2022 12:00
The Guardian
‘He looks like an astronaut in space’: Hannah Cassidy’s best phone picture

The British photographer on the timeless quality black and white gives to an image of a young boy learning to swim

Harry had never swum without armbands before. It was August 2021 and the three-year-old was on holiday with his parents, grandparents, sister and aunt, the photographer Hannah Cassidy. It had been the second arduous year of pandemic restrictions and time stuck at home for the toddler, so he and his sister Rose, six, were thrilled to arrive in southern Spain. The extended family had rented a villa in Murcia and from day one the kids gravitated towards the pool. Rose had taken swimming lessons before, but Harry had not.

“A few days in, we switched his armbands for a float that strapped to his back,” Cassidy says. “He was standing on the side while we were in the pool, cheering him on, encouraging him to jump in and try to swim towards us. The outstretched arms you can see belong to Rose. They’re really close.”

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1st October 2022 11:00
The Guardian
Gun reformers feel history is on their side despite bleak outlook in Congress

The few Republican supporters of gun restrictions have faced backlash from the party faithful

When Joe Biden signed the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act into law this summer, he and congressional Democrats celebrated the enactment of the first significant gun control policy in decades in the US.

The US president also acknowledged that the law, a bipartisan compromise brokered after the Uvalde tragedy that left 19 children and two adults dead, did not go nearly far enough to address the devastation caused by gun violence.

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1st October 2022 11:00
The Guardian
The great British sell-off: why are we allowing our arts to be privatised by stealth? | Charlotte Higgins

Gallery by gallery, museum by museum, the public stake in our cultural institutions is shrinking

There is a frequent complaint from the right that that the deep-rooted ideological position of the BBC, universities, theatres, museums and other arts and cultural organisations is a long-uncontested leftiness.

The paranoia about this is extreme: consider that the prime minister, Liz Truss, complained to the journalist Tom Newton Dunn during a party leadership hustings that he had framed a question “in a leftwing way”. The sheer insanity here – though her words were doubtless carefully chosen to seed distrust in the media in general – is that Newton Dunn is the former longstanding political editor of the Sun, and not notorious for his raging socialism.

Charlotte Higgins is the Guardian’s chief culture writer

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1st October 2022 11:00
The Guardian
Jason Derulo: ‘What happens when we die? I am going in a first-class seat to heaven’

The singer on a wardrobe malfunction at Wembley, being told he has a dad bod and his love of chocolate lava cake

Born in Florida, Jason Derulo, 33, attended the American Musical and Dramatic Academy in Los Angeles. In 2009, his debut single Whatcha Say was a huge hit, and other chart-toppers include Wiggle, Take You Dancing, Acapulco, Savage Love and this year’s Slidin’ (ft Kodak Black). Derulo has sold more than 200m records worldwide and has more than 52.5 million TikTok followers. He lives in Los Angeles.

When were you happiest?
When my son Jason King Derulo was born.

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1st October 2022 10:30
The Guardian
Little Fires Everywhere author Celeste Ng: ‘Elena and Mia constantly butt heads with each other inside me’

The writer of the novel that inspired the hit TV series starring Reese Witherspoon and Kerry Washington talks about how her new book turned dystopian after Trump came to power

Celeste Ng’s first novel, Everything I Never Told You, about a Chinese American family in 1970s Ohio, became a bestseller in 2014. Her follow up, Little Fires Everywhere, explored the underside of the seemingly utopian community of Shaker Heights, Ohio, where Ng lived in her teens, and became a hit TV series starring Reese Witherspoon and Kerry Washington. Her latest, Our Missing Hearts, is something of a departure; it is set in the near future, when laws have been passed to preserve “American culture”, resulting in discrimination against Asian Americans and ultimately tearing families apart. She explains why what she planned as a domestic novel turned so dark.


Your new book reads as a nightmare scenario, yet it could so easily be true. How did it take shape for you?
I started writing in October 2016, right after I had finished Little Fires Everywhere, and I thought it was going to be a fairly realistic and conventional novel about a mother-son relationship. And while this idea was still coalescing, Trump was elected. We saw the rise of the far right, we saw a lot of the elements that had been bubbling under the surface come right up to the top. These feelings of anger and resentment and hatred and bigotry. That only increased throughout the years that followed, and that started to leach its way into the story. The book felt like the only way for me to wrestle with some of these questions that I was asking myself, like how do we move through this? How do you raise the next generation in this world?

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1st October 2022 10:00
The Guardian
Trickle-down Truss is carrying on the dirty work of Thatcher, Blair and Osborne | Yanis Varoufakis

Britain has endured 40 years of decline thanks to this faulty economic theory. Will Keir Starmer finally kill it off?

If Kwasi Kwarteng’s mini-budget survives the storm it triggered, a banker on a million-pound annual salary stands to receive £50,000 of income tax relief – on top of the extra bonuses the bank can throw in, now that the Liz Truss government has removed the cap on them. Meanwhile, a Deliveroo rider gets a pep talk on the emancipatory value of aspiring to be wealthy, presumably as an incentive to pedal harder. This is the gist of the government’s growth strategy or, according to former Brexit minister David Frost, its antidote to stagnation and defeatism.

While it’s tempting to draw the obvious analogy between zombie ideas such as the trickle-down growth effect, and the classic Hollywood horror film Night of the Living Dead, a more appropriate response to the seriousness of the situation is to follow the banker’s extra cash. The government claims the banker will invest it, thus promoting growth. If it were not a blatant lie, it might have passed as a touching example of unfounded faith. But unlike Adam Smith’s bakers, butchers and brewers, who would invest any spare cash into better and more bread, ale and meat, the banker will buy into some fund that will, in turn, purchase shares, derivatives and bonds.

Yanis Varoufakis is the leader of MeRA25 in Greece’s parliament, a former finance minister of Greece, and author of Another Now

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1st October 2022 10:00
The Guardian
New-look USA see off China for fourth straight Fiba World Cup before record crowd

  • USA win 83-61 over China in Women’s World Cup final
  • Americans win fourth straight Fiba title and 11th overall
  • A’ja Wilson (19 points) named MVP of Fiba World Cup

A’ja Wilson scored 19 points, Kelsey Plum added 17 and the United States beat China 83-61 on Saturday to win their fourth consecutive gold medal at the women’s basketball World Cup.

This was one of the most dominant teams in the Americans’ storied history in the World Cup that now has won 11 gold medals. They now have won four straight gold medals for the first-time ever. This was also the biggest win in a gold-medal game, surpassing the 20-point wins that the Americans had done twice.

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1st October 2022 09:58
The Guardian
Tamal Ray’s recipe for pork belly sandwiches with apple and fennel slaw

You can either make this like pulled pork, cooked low and slow, or take a shorter oven route. Either way, it’s irresistible

Years ago, while pottering around a south London market with friends, I had one of the best sandwiches of my life: a succulent filling of twice-cooked pork, first barbecued, then fried with spices. It was so good that, after seeing my friends off at the station, I circled back to get another. Today’s slow-cooker recipe is an homage to that hallowed sandwich, which I still think about often.

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1st October 2022 09:00
The Guardian
‘Our entire community is wiped out’: low-income Americans likely to be hit hardest by Hurricane Ian

After the storm knocked out power and destroyed property, people scramble for shelter, funds and news of missing loved ones

For Connie Irvin, 82, and her partner, Cheryl Lange, the cost of Hurricane Ian’s devastating tear across Florida was clear. “Our entire community is wiped out,” said Irvin.

The pair lost their mobile home on Sanibel Island off the state’s west coast and are now homeless, staying in a motel inland about 35 miles away near Naples, Florida, that currently has no electricity.

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1st October 2022 08:30
The Guardian
The Bear: television so good it might actually kill you

Some of the best – and most intense – TV in years, Jeremy Allen White turns up the heat as a world-class chef forced to take over his brother’s sandwich shop

I am always thinking of fun and interesting new ways to kill people and get away with it. My current favourite method is this: I invite someone with a weak heart to my house with the promise of a quality TV show. I put on the first two episodes of The Bear. If they do not die of that, I’ll put Uncut Gems on for a bit, which has roughly the same tempo. At this point even I am thinking I might die. If they are still alive (flushed, puce, asking for water), I will show them the penultimate episode of The Bear), which nobody who has ever had to switch to a plant-based spread because of their cholesterol can survive unaided. I flop the body out of the window to the flat downstairs. That is a downstairs problem now.

This might sound like I do not think The Bear – a show about a very intense sandwich shop, essentially – is one of the finest TV shows of the last five years, which it is, but we cannot tiptoe around the fact that it starts out stressful. Even Jeremy Allen White’s head chef Carmy is stressed by the whole affair: here he is, look, waking at 6am; here he is frantically chopping an onion then shouting for “hands!”; here is he reliving a personal trauma; here he is reliving a family one; the doorbell buzzes, a pan is on fire. The best food in the world is made by people with tattoos and scars they refuse to explain, who are all operating on three feverish hours of sleep and are yelling, and The Bear sinks you into the hot oil of that, skin-side down. Watch the first two episodes and know what it is like to be hissed at because you boiled a stock on too high a heat. Watch The Bear to know what working back-to-back shifts in hospitality feels like. Watch with a snack, because somehow it will still make you hungry.

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1st October 2022 08:00
The Guardian
What’s Prison For? Concise diagnosis of a huge American problem

Bill Keller, once editor of the New York Times, now with the Marshall Project, shows how the US came to imprison so many of its citizens, disproportionately Black and brown, and how such a gross injustice might yet be addressed

The statistics are familiar but remain startling: America’s incarceration rate per 100,000 is “roughly twice that of Russia’s and Iran’s, four times that of Mexico’s, five times of England’s, six times Canada’s” and nine times that of Germany. In addition, “parole and probation regulate the lives of 4.5 million Americans” – more than twice as many as are confined in prison.

These numbers come at the beginning of Bill Keller’s smart, short new book, in which he tries to explain how America became so addicted to mass incarceration, and how we might finally reform a system which houses a disproportionally Black and brown population.

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1st October 2022 08:00
The Guardian
‘This is hell’: two years and no power in Europe’s largest shantytown

In the Cañada Real, close to Madrid, residents adapt to survive, but there is fear as they look ahead to winter

The struggle to survive without electricity for two whole years has left its mark on the flesh and fabric of sector six of the Cañada Real. It is there in the second-degree burns on the leg of the little boy who got too close to a gas heater, and in the dry, cracked hands of the woman who does the family’s washing with a stone and a bar of soap.

It is there in the solar panels that have appeared on the roofs of the luckier residents, and in the fires that burn in the cold, dark homes of the less fortunate. And it is there in the memories of the people of Europe’s largest shantytown, which lies half an hour’s drive from the centre of Madrid.

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1st October 2022 08:00
The Guardian
‘Out of the inferno, into the shark attack’: Marina Hyde on capturing six years of political chaos

From Brexit to Boris, Trump to Truss, there’s been no shortage of material for the Guardian columnist. But as the omnishambles becomes a permacrisis, even she wants it to stop …

The past few years have been an age of abundance for the news columnist. For pretty much everyone else, they have been an age of gathering chaos and rising disbelief. The news gods are so deeply committed to providing their own metaphors that our septic isle is now literally lapped at by tides of sewage. I don’t know if future historians will officially slap the permacrisis label on us, but as someone whose job it is to write about the news, I need hardly point out there hasn’t exactly been a shortage of material. Even I am on the point of launching a “Stop the news” campaign, and will inform you of how to join the push for total stasis as soon as I get membership badges sorted.

This has been a period when it often seemed like the UK (and beyond) had tumbled down a rabbit hole. Or gone through the looking-glass. Or maybe got trapped in the ancient curse: “May you live in interesting times.” Things seem to have become permanently “interesting”.

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1st October 2022 08:00
The Guardian
‘It’s not an unsolvable case’: has the Zodiac killer finally been found?

Author Jarett Kobek never intended to make the case the focus of his book but he may have solved the 50-year-old mystery

When author Jarett Kobek started researching the Zodiac killer for a book during the pandemic, he didn’t want to become just another amateur sleuth claiming to have finally solved the case that’s gripped America for decades.

Yet, that’s more or less what happened. Kobek came across Paul Doerr, a San Francisco Bay area man who died in 2007, who he thinks is likely responsible for the killings and is the subject of his book: How to Find Zodiac.

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1st October 2022 07:01
The Guardian
‘It’s embellished, but it’s a TV show’: is Chicago happy with the way it’s portrayed in The Bear?

The surprise US TV hit of the summer has divided Chicagoans about the picture it paints of the city and its eateries

In the back of the house at the Original Beef of Chicagoland, things are tense. Space is limited. Money is low. Bills are literally piling up. There aren’t enough pots and knives to go around. The mixer doesn’t work. The meat supplier didn’t deliver enough beef.

This is the world of The Bear, the widely talked about US TV show that premiered this summer, which finally comes to the UK on 5 October on Disney+. Now UK audiences can follow the trials and tribulations of Carmen “Carmy” Berzatto, a successful yet troubled young chef who, after the sudden death of his brother, returns home to Chicago to run his family’s struggling sandwich shop.

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1st October 2022 07:01
The Guardian
Blind date: ‘Did we kiss? No, we’re saving that for next time’

Plamena, 28, diversity and inclusion professional, meets Nathan, 30, group business development manager


What were you hoping for?

To enjoy a delicious dinner and engaging conversation with someone with an open mind and similar values and beliefs.

First impressions?
Nathan was very bubbly and curious. He was also dressed well, had a great smile and lots of tattoos, which I liked.

What did you talk about?
Travelling. Fitness. Food. Our jobs and family stories. I was surprised how much we had in common. We share similar views on virtually everything, as if I’d met the male version of me!

Any awkward moments?
No, it felt smooth throughout.

Good table manners?
I feel I have to say “impeccable”. And they were!

Best thing about Nathan?
His curiosity and willingness to try new things.

Would you introduce him to your friends?
Yes, I think they’d get on well.

Describe Nathan in three words.
Open-minded, adventurous, driven.

What do you think he made of you?
We stayed out till late, he asked for my number, and texted that night so I’m pretty sure he had a good time.

Did you go on somewhere?
Yes, we went for drinks (I love that he’s also a gin and tonic fan). And the conversation continued to flow.

And … did you kiss?
No, we’re saving that for next time.

If you could change one thing about the evening what would it be?
To go on for longer; it felt like we had so much to talk about that five hours weren’t enough.

Marks out of 10?
Ten, because I couldn’t have asked for a more enjoyable night.

Would you meet again?
Yes, it’s in the diary already.

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1st October 2022 07:00
The Guardian
Antonio Inoki, popular wrestler who faced Muhammad Ali, dies aged 79

  • Popular wrestler and politician Antonio Inoki dies aged 79
  • Japanese star was battling rare disease called amyloidosis

The popular Japanese professional wrestler and lawmaker Antonio Inoki, who faced world boxing champion Muhammad Ali in a mixed martial arts match in 1976, has died at 79.

Inoki brought Japanese pro wrestling to fame and pioneered mixed martial arts matches between top wrestlers and champions from other combat sports like judo, karate and boxing.

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1st October 2022 06:56
The Guardian
North Korea fires ballistic missiles in fourth launch in a week after naval drills

Launch follows joint military drills by South Korea, Japan and the US and visit by Kamala Harris

North Korea has fired two more ballistic missiles, South Korea’s military said, its fourth such launch this week as Seoul, Tokyo and Washington ramp up joint military drills.

The launch early on Saturday came after the navies of South Korea, the United States and Japan staged trilateral anti-submarine exercises on Friday for the first time in five years, and the US vice-president, Kamala Harris, made a visit to the region this week.

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1st October 2022 04:43
The Guardian
Elon Musk unveils humanoid ‘Optimus’ robot at Tesla’s AI Day

Prototype walks onstage and waves at event as company looks to future beyond vehicles

Tesla CEO Elon Musk showcased his much-touted humanoid robot “Optimus” at the electric vehicle maker’s “AI Day” event on Friday.

The billionaire has said a robot business will be worth more than its cars, hoping to expand beyond self-driving vehicles that have not yet become a reality despite his repeated promises.

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1st October 2022 04:24
The Guardian
‘Corey was just a tourist’: two decades after the Bali bombings, the grief remains

Kevin Paltridge will remember his 20-year-old son at a Perth dawn service made harder by news of the imminent release of a perpetrator of the 2002 attacks

When Kevin Paltridge’s son Corey was killed in the 2002 Bali bombings, the devastated father turned to other Australians whose children had died suddenly to try to cope with his own loss.

He quit his job as an airline supervisor and went to work at a funeral home, where he worked until his retirement a decade ago.

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1st October 2022 04:00
The Guardian
Hurricane Ian moves into South Carolina after rampage in Florida

Twenty-one people dead with toll expected to rise after mega-storm carves wide path of devastation and moves north

The coast of South Carolina was hit on Friday with a direct strike from Hurricane Ian, the deadly mega-storm that carved a wide path of destruction on its earlier rampage through Florida.

The eye of the hurricane crossed over land at Georgetown, between Myrtle Beach and the historic city of Charleston, after strengthening overnight in the Atlantic.

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1st October 2022 03:20
The Guardian
What happened in the Russia-Ukraine war this week? Catch up with the must-read news and analysis

Vladimir Putin signs illegal annexation of Ukrainian regions; Volodymyr Zelenskiy applies for Ukraine to join Nato; drafted Russians must flee or fight

Every week we wrap up the must-reads from our coverage of the Ukraine war, from news and features to analysis, visual guides and opinion.

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1st October 2022 01:32
The Guardian
‘You can’t unsee this’: Richard Mosse’s all-consuming plea to save the Amazon

Across a 20-metre panoramic screen in ultra-high resolution, visitors bear witness to environmental degradation – in a piece that overwhelms the senses

You don’t just watch Broken Spectre – you also feel it. The sound travels along the floor and up into your body. Your brain stretches to breaking point trying to take in the images stretched across the 20-metre screen. In a pitch-black room, it’s like being suspended in a black hole, devoid of any distraction.

The immersive new work from photographic artist Richard Mosse at the National Gallery of Victoria is unlike anything I’ve experienced. One comparison could be the work of James Turrell, which can also plunge you into altered states, playing with your perception and consciousness.

Sign up for the fun stuff with our rundown of must-reads, pop culture and tips for the weekend, every Saturday morning

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1st October 2022 01:16
The Guardian
The week around the world in 20 pictures

Protests against the mobilisation in Moscow, the aftermath of Super Typhoon Noru, an emotional Roger Federer and Hurricane Ian’s deadly rampage across Florida: the most striking images this week

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1st October 2022 00:19
The Guardian
Russia’s consulate in New York vandalized in apparent protest

Building defaced hours before Putin announced annexation of Ukrainian territories and Russian forces killed 30 civilians

The Russian consulate in New York has been vandalized with red spray paint, in an apparent protest against Vladimir Putin’s invasion of Ukraine.

Officers said they responded to an emergency call just after 1.30am on Friday reporting that paint had been sprayed across the facade of the consulate on Manhattan’s Upper East Side.

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30th September 2022 23:54
The Guardian
Musiala and Mané help Bayern end winless run in style against Leverkusen

Jamal Musiala scored once and set up two more goals as champions Bayern Munich cruised past Bayer Leverkusen 4-0 on Friday to snap a four-game winless run in the Bundesliga and climb into second place.

The Germany international delivered a superb performance for a confidence-boosting win before Tuesday’s Champions League group game against Viktoria Plzen and the big Bundesliga match against Borussia Dortmund next weekend.

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30th September 2022 23:10
The Guardian
Burkina Faso’s military leader ousted in second coup this year

Army officer Captain Ibrahim Traore has overthrown Paul-Henri Damiba, eight months after he took power

Members of Burkina Faso’s army have seized control of state television, declaring that they had ousted military leader Paul-Henri Damiba, dissolved the government and suspended the constitution and transitional charter.

In a statement read on national television late on Friday, Captain Ibrahim Traore said a group of officers had decided to remove Damiba due to his inability to deal with a worsening Islamist insurgency. He announced that borders were closed indefinitely and that all political and civil society activities were suspended.

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30th September 2022 22:36
The Guardian
‘I will not’: how Julia Gillard’s words of white-hot anger reverberated around the world

Ten years on from the misogyny speech, Katharine Murphy reflects on how it was framed at the time – and what has been gained since

I was nervous about looking back at the words I wrote on 9 October, 2012. I didn’t think my reporting would be terrible, I just doubted I’d be proud of it. Back then, my primary job was liveblogging federal politics. The Age, the broadsheet newspaper I worked for then, was transforming itself into a digital-first news agency. The transition was brutal. There was mass job shedding as the internet blew a hole in our business models. Journalists wondered what journalism actually was in this new age, and there were turf wars going on inside Fairfax as the newspaper and digital arms were integrated.

Live reporting was a refuge from those existential uncertainties. In that mode, I covered parliament in 10-or-15-minute intervals, sometimes posting for 12 hours at a time. We were making this style of reporting up as we went. Readers had a voracious appetite for news as it happened, and we were trying to migrate the old newspaper values to live reportage in the new world. None of this scene setting is an excuse, it’s just context. I’m scoping out my professional milieu as I sat, plugged into the matrix, and listened to Julia Gillard hurling the words that became the misogyny speech – a set of words powerful enough to travel around the world.

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30th September 2022 22:00
The Guardian
The biggest hack in history: Australians scramble to change passports and driver licences after Optus telco data debacle

Government says telecommunications giant ‘left the window open’ for unsophisticated attack that could lead to European-style privacy laws

When Amy Hunting* first heard about one of the biggest cyber attacks in Australian history, she immediately checked to see if her personal details had been compromised.

She realised that, as a customer of the country’s second largest telecommunications provider, Optus, there was a fair chance she was one of about 10 million people whose information had been hacked – but at first, there was no communication. Eventually she got an email saying she had been caught up in the breach, which exposed one in three Australians to the risk of identity theft or financial fraud.

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30th September 2022 22:00
The Guardian
Victoria Beckham chooses glamour over fireworks for Paris fashion week

Presence of daughter-in-law in front row draws a line under gossip after rumours of a feud

Can a Spice Girl pull off French-girl chic? Victoria Beckham has won over fashion sceptics in New York and London, but for her first catwalk show in almost three years she upped the ante with a jump to the quintessential style capital.

“Paris is the ultimate dream,” said Beckham before a show staged in the honeyed stone cloisters of the baroque Val de Grace church. “It’s a pinch-me moment to be here.” Although the designer insisted she was more excited than nervous, this is a challenging time for her brand. A work-from-home zeitgeist has been an ill wind for a name which trades on jet-set glamour. Prices have had to come down in order to boost sales. And the celebrity circus around the Beckham name – invaluable for bringing allure and piquancy to a relatively small fashion label – had threatened to overshadow the show with rumours of a ‘feud’ between Beckham and her daughter-in-law.

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30th September 2022 21:58
The Guardian
Cool, candid and sometimes angry, New Zealand’s laureate wants to make poetry pop

After years of forging his own path on the literary scene, Chris Tse doesn’t mind taking poetic licence with expectations

Fan of Taylor Swift, lover of glam-rock fashion – Chris Tse isn’t your typical poet laureate.

At 39, he is the youngest New Zealander to hold the title. When Tse reads the list of poetry greats who have received the honour and spies his own name at the bottom, he feels “a little bit ill”.

QUESTION FROM THE AUDIENCE #2:

My question is in two parts. Aren’t you being racist yourself by calling me a racist? And what will you write about when you run out of otherness?

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30th September 2022 21:00
The Guardian
Chelsea executive initially brushed off female agent’s complaint over inappropriate messages

  • Tom Glick initially told Catalina Kim it did not interest him
  • Glick said he had not reviewed messages and swiftly sacked employee

Chelsea’s president of business, Tom Glick, told a female agent that her complaint to him about a string of inappropriate messages from a senior executive he had hired days earlier did not interest him and was not relevant to his job.

Glick’s initial response to Catalina Kim came after she forwarded him historical messages of a sexual nature she had received from Damian Willoughby, whose brief period as Chelsea’s commercial director ended last week with his sacking over the matter.

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30th September 2022 20:47
The Guardian
Phil Salt powers England to emphatic victory and levels series with Pakistan

So this see-saw T20 series, the longest ever played between two international teams, has tipped again. England won the sixth match by eight wickets with 33 balls to spare. Which means everything is level at three matches each. Sunday’s game will be decisive.

England’s top order finally clicked, in the same way the pill will eventually land on your lucky number if you keep spinning the roulette wheel. Phil Salt, who had made 71 runs in his last eight T20 innings for England, splattered 88 runs across the Gaddafi Stadium, off just 41 balls. It was a brilliant knock, all vicious pulls and swingeing cuts and rocketing drives which skipped across the outfield so quickly that the chasing fielders seemed to move like molasses in January in comparison.

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30th September 2022 20:08
The Guardian
The Molly Russell inquest verdict damns Silicon Valley. There can be no more excuses | Peter Wanless and Beeban Kidron

These companies make decisions that harm children. The government must take action

  • Sir Peter Wanless is the chief executive of the NSPCC. Lady Beeban Kidron is the founder and chair of 5 Rights

The ruling in a coroner’s court in north London on Friday will be felt around the world. The senior coroner, Andrew Walker, concluded that 14-year-old Molly Russell “died from an act of self-harm while suffering from depression and the negative effects of online content”.

The content, he determined, had contributed to her death in a more than minimal way. This is an immensely significant verdict.

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30th September 2022 19:25
The Guardian
Social media firms ‘monetising misery’, says Molly Russell’s father after inquest

Coroner finds harmful online content likely to have contributed to Molly’s death ‘in a more than minimal way’

Molly Russell’s father has accused the world’s biggest social media firms of “monetising misery” after an inquest ruled that harmful online content contributed to the 14-year-old’s death.

Ian Russell accused Meta, the owner of Facebook and Instagram, of guiding his daughter on a “demented trail of life-sucking content”, after the landmark ruling raised the regulatory pressure on social media companies.

In the UK and Ireland, Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123, or email jo@samaritans.org or jo@samaritans.ie. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is 13 11 14. Other international helplines can be found at befrienders.org.

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30th September 2022 19:17
The Guardian
Behind the shining pomp of the Red Square rally is a Russia in turmoil

As a Moscow concert marked Putin’s declaration of the annexation of four regions of Ukraine, the backlash to mobilisation reached fever pitch

A tide of Russians flowed toward Red Square as Vladimir Putin declared his annexation of Ukrainian territory that would herald a shining new era of perpetual war with Ukraine and the west. “Donetsk, Luhansk, Zaporizhzhia, Kherson, Russia! Together for ever!” read the banner hanging on Manezh Square by the Kremlin.

There were busloads of tough men from a factory near Moscow alighting by the statue of Karl Marx to celebrate, university teachers passing out invitations to a pop concert to their students, workers lugging armfuls of Russian flags to distribute. Some of the tricolours bore the image of Putin.

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30th September 2022 19:17
The Guardian
Brazil football star Neymar backs far-right Bolsonaro days before election

Paris Saint-Germain forward posts video in support of far-right president, who is trailing badly in polls ahead of Sunday’s vote

The Brazilian football star Neymar has come out in support of President Jair Bolsonaro, three days before the far-right leader looks set to lose a bitter re-election race against his leftist rival Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva.

Lounging in a gaming chair, the Paris Saint-Germain forward recorded a video singing along to a Bolsonaro jingle and making V signs with both hands to signify 22, the number of Bolsonaro’s party as it appears on Brazil’s electronic ballots.

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30th September 2022 19:12
The Guardian
Size of Nord Stream blasts equal to large amount of explosive, UN told

Experts suggest maintenance robots may have planted bombs, as concern grows over methane buildup

Denmark and Sweden have said leaks from the Nord Stream pipelines in the Baltic Sea were caused by blasts equivalent to the power of “several hundred kilograms of explosive”.

The conclusions were made in a joint report by Denmark and Sweden which was delivered to the United Nations. The UN environment programme said on Friday the ruptures are likely to have led to the biggest single release of climate-damaging methane ever recorded.

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30th September 2022 18:52
The Guardian
Ukraine applies for Nato membership after Russia annexes territory

Volodymyr Zelenskiy dismisses Moscow ceremony as a farce and rules out negotiations with Putin

A defiant Volodymyr Zelenskiy has announced that Ukraine is officially applying for membership of Nato, hours after Vladimir Putin said in a Kremlin ceremony that he was annexing four Ukrainian provinces.

In a speech filmed outside his presidential office in Kyiv, Zelenskiy said he was taking this “decisive step” in order to protect “the entire community” of Ukrainians. He promised the application would happen in an “expedited manner”.

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30th September 2022 17:51
The Guardian
Putin’s annexation speech: more angry taxi driver than head of state

Russian leader’s rambling speech focuses on western sins and leaves key Ukraine questions unanswered

Russia-Ukraine war: latest updates

Putin annexes four regions of Ukraine

Eight-and-a-half years after Vladimir Putin announced the annexation of Crimea, he gathered the elites of Russia in the Kremlin’s St George Hall for another land-grab ceremony: this time laying claim to four more Ukrainian regions.

The annexation formalities were preceded by an angry, rambling speech that dwelled only briefly on either Ukraine or the four regions of which Russia now claims ownership. Instead, Putin railed at the west for a litany of sins, ranging from destabilising Russia in the 17th century to allowing gender reassignment surgery.

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30th September 2022 17:22
The Guardian
Finally, the Depp v Heard trial movie that no one wanted is here

A cheaply made and poorly acted new dramatisation of the two stars on the stand has been rushed out but for whom exactly?

Never has a made for television movie had a title quite as apt as Hot Take: The Depp/Heard Trial. The film is a dramatisation of the defamation trial that Johnny Depp brought against Amber Heard, regarding the collapse of their marriage, and subsequent collapse of their reputations as even vaguely employable actors.

The trial, you will remember, ended in June. The movie is out today, in September. That is a very hot take. Scaldingly hot. It’s arguably too hot. The whole thing has been written, cast, shot and edited in a matter of weeks. And this means that it probably isn’t something that you’ll want to watch if you consider yourself a fan of nuance or consideration or any amount of perspective whatsoever.

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30th September 2022 16:46
The Guardian
‘Deliberate war crime’: horror as Russian missile hits civilian convoy

Blast tore through metal and shattered glass as people queued to travel to Russian-occupied territory

In the dirt car park of a sprawling car parts market just outside the city of Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, the bodies told horrific stories of the moment a Russian missile struck a civilian convoy, killing 25 and injuring scores more.

A man in late middle age was slumped inside his car, one hand holding the steering wheel. Not far away, partially covered in a sheet, another person appeared to be kneeling, collapsed next to the wheelie case they had been pulling.

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30th September 2022 16:23
The Guardian
Brazil’s collective candidacies shake up election: ‘Cast one vote, get five black women’

New, diverse wave are running for office on common platform and pledging to share duties – but can they avoid ruptures?

Democracy is famously described as one person, one vote, and the final part of the electoral equation is so obvious it does not need saying: one winner.

But that formula is being challenged in Brazil this year, where a new wave of what are called collective candidacies are shaking up the traditional way of doing politics.

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30th September 2022 15:56
The Guardian
Those desiring regime change in Russia should be careful what they wish for | Rajan Menon and Daniel R DePetris

Many western analysts are clearly hoping Putin’s disastrous Ukraine war brings his downfall. But the track record in these cases isn’t great

Vladimir Putin’s 21 September mobilization order, which aims to deploy 300,000 reservists to Ukraine, and possibly as many as 1.2 million, is an act of desperation aimed at saving a faltering war that he now owns. But his military call-up is also a huge gamble. For 22 years Putin has solidified his rule through an implicit pact with the Russian people: don’t make political waves and you will live comfortably. His mobilization order has broken that pact, and many Russians are taking to the streets or running to the border to flee the country.

It’s not hyperbole to suggest that Putin is facing his biggest challenge since becoming president in 2000. A leader who once seemed infallible and irreplaceable suddenly appears vulnerable, so much so that the media is now speculating about whether Putin might lose power.

Rajan Menon is the director of the Grand Strategy Program at Defense Priorities, a professor emeritus at the Powell School, City College, and a senior research fellow at the Saltzman Institute for War and Peace Studies, Columbia. He is the co-author of Conflict in Ukraine: The Unwinding of the Post-Cold War Order

Daniel R DePetris is a fellow at Defense Priorities and a foreign affairs columnist for the Chicago Tribune and Newsweek, among other publications

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30th September 2022 14:56
The Guardian
Destruction, drums and dusting: Friday’s best photos

The Guardian’s picture editors select photo highlights from around the world

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30th September 2022 14:40
The Guardian
Ukraine: footage shows aftermath of deadly Russian strike on civilian convoy – video

A civilian convoy of cars heading to pick up relatives trying to flee Russian occupied territory in Ukraine has been hit by Russian forces near the city of Zaporizhzhia, with initial reports saying dozens were killed and injured. That casualty figure could not immediately be confirmed. Footage from the horrific scene shows dead and injured people lying on a road on the south-eastern outskirts of the city

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30th September 2022 11:41
The Guardian
Weather tracker: Typhoon Noru wreaks havoc across south-east Asia

As Hurricane Ian hits the Americas, Noru has been ripping through the Philippines, Vietnam and Thailand

Hurricane Ian has been in the headlines but it is not the only storm that has been causing havoc in the past week.

On Tuesday, Typhoon Noru struck south of the city of Da Nang in Vietnam, heading westwards to Thailand. Initially a tropical storm, Noru originated in the Philippine Sea on 23 September, propagating westwards while gathering moisture and strengthening.

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30th September 2022 10:59
The Guardian
The week in wildlife – in pictures

The best of this week’s wildlife pictures, including an injured pangolin, a trapped dragonfly and a sneaky pig

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30th September 2022 09:00
The Guardian
‘My life is wonderful on the road’: the Chinese woman who broke the mould

Feeling trapped amid the expectations of being a housewife and grandmother, Su Min set off, finding freedom and fame as she travelled around China

In late 2020 Su Min left her unhappy marriage behind and hit the road. The 58-year-old retiree had raised her family and done her duties, and her husband, she says, was treating her badly. So she studied online videos about road trips and set off across China alone in a VW hatchback with her pension and a rooftop tent.

As she travelled, Su filmed and posted videos and diaries of her journey, speaking candidly of her dissatisfying life of housework. She also marvelled at the beauty of the country she was finally exploring, and made new friends.

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30th September 2022 08:21
The Guardian
‘Dreams can come true’: Uganda’s first female pro cyclist aims for the Tour de France

Florence Nakaggwa talks about her goal to introduce the sport to more girls, and how working in a hair salon was never the right path for her

It is September and the beginning of the rainy season in Uganda, when roads become flooded with clay waters. Everyone is slowed down by the incessant downpours. In spite of these conditions, 21-year old Florence Nakaggwa is out training in the outskirts of Masaka, a town 80 miles south-west of the Ugandan capital, Kampala.

She cycles between 30-60 miles (50-100km) each day, switching from tarmac to the red soil of village roads.

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30th September 2022 08:00
The Guardian
Marilyn Nance’s images of FESTAC ‘77 in Lagos

In early 1977, more than 15,000 artists, intellectuals, and performers from 55 nations worldwide gathered in Lagos, Nigeria for the Second World Black and African Festival of Arts and Culture, also known as FESTAC ‘77. Taking place in the heyday of Nigeria’s oil wealth and known as one of the largest cultural and political events in the history of decolonisation, the event was the peak of Pan-Africanist expression. Photographer and visual artist Marilyn Nance’s images offer a glimpse of the radical possibilities of Pan-African unity.

  • Marilyn Nance: Last Day in Lagos is available worldwide via Distributed Art Publishers from 1 October
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30th September 2022 08:00
The Guardian
Most UK adults think nature is in urgent need of protection – poll

YouGov survey for major charities finds 81% believe wildlife and environment are under threat

A majority of the public believe nature is under threat and needs urgent action to protect and restore it, according to a YouGov poll.

The poll for the National Trust, RSPB and WWF comes as they and other mainstream green groups are mobilising their millions of members to counter what they say is the government’s attack on nature.

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30th September 2022 07:00
The Guardian
Near the Greenwich pub where the mini-budget was born, Londoners share their fears

Citizens already describe feeling depressed, furious and highly anxious about the future

“All the worst ideas happen at the pub, don’t they?” said Brett Lucas as he sat on a park bench in Greenwich Park, south-east London with his girlfriend Becky Nolan, a 25-year-old nurse.

They are a few minutes walk away from the Richard the First pub, where the chancellor, Kwasi Kwarteng, and prime minister Liz Truss reportedly thrashed out the plan for a mini-budget that sparked turmoil on financial markets, and left a lot of ordinary people equally terrified.

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30th September 2022 07:00
The Guardian
Dolphins’ loss to Bengals overshadowed by Tua Tagovailoa’s hospitalization

  • Bengals top Miami 27-15 after injured Tagovailoa carted off
  • Miami quarterback hospitalized with neck and head injuries
  • Tagovailoa was coming off injury scare in Sunday’s victory

Joe Burrow tossed a late two-yard touchdown pass to Hayden Hurst to seal a 27-15 win for the Cincinnati Bengals over Miami in a Thursday game marred by the horrific sight of Dolphins quarterback Tua Tagovailoa being taken off on a stretcher.

Tagovailoa was chased down and thrown to the turf by Cincinnati’s Josh Tupou in the first half. He remained down for more than seven minutes before being taken to a hospital with reported head and neck injuries. The Dolphins later said they expected him to be discharged and fly home with his team.

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30th September 2022 05:12
The Guardian
Brazil’s election: a last chance to save the Amazon?

Brazilians will go to the polls on Sunday with a stark choice to make about the future of their country. And it is one that will have far-reaching implications for the future of the planet, too, says Tom Phillips

On Sunday, Brazilians will go to the polls to vote for their next president. After four chaotic years under the far-right leader Jair Bolsonaro, who is running again, it’s an election that could have huge consequences.

It’s a chance for voters to come to a verdict on Bolsonaro’s handling of the Covid pandemic and the resulting economic crisis in Brazil. And it’s also a chance to eject a president who has been disastrous for the Amazon rainforest, a vital resource for the future of humanity. With illegal logging and mining rampant, the “lungs of the world” are reaching a tipping point, and another four years of Bolsonaro could lead to a point of no return.

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30th September 2022 04:00
The Guardian
Arctic Ocean acidifying up to four times as fast as other oceans, study finds

Scientists ‘shocked’ by rate of change as rapid sea-ice melt drives absorption of CO2 – with ‘huge implications’ for Arctic sea life

Acidification of the western Arctic Ocean is happening three to four times faster than in other ocean basins, a new study has found.

The ocean, which absorbs a third of all of the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, has grown more acidic because of fossil fuel use. Rapid loss of sea ice in the Arctic region over the past three decades has accelerated the rate of long-term acidification, according to the study, published in Science on Thursday.

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29th September 2022 20:00
The Guardian
Could a digital twin of Tuvalu preserve the island nation before it’s lost to the collapsing climate?

With rising seas expected to submerge the nation by 2100, official says ‘we should always be able to remember Tuvalu as it is, before it disappears’

When Tuvalu vanishes beneath rising seas, its diaspora still want somewhere to call home – and that could be a virtual version of the tiny Pacific nation.

Global heating is threatening to submerge Tuvalu by the end of the century, and its 12,000 inhabitants are considering the future.

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29th September 2022 19:30
The Guardian
A global problem? Liz Truss’s claims on financial chaos fact-checked

We look at claims made by the PM and the chief secretary to the Treasury that have raised eyebrows

After days of silence, Liz Truss has finally faced questions on the UK financial market turmoil triggered by the government’s plans for sweeping tax cuts.

The prime minister agreed to a series of interviews with local BBC radio stations on Thursday, while Chris Philp, Kwasi Kwarteng’s number two at the Treasury, also answered questions on BBC radio.

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29th September 2022 16:19
The Guardian
Mahsa Amini: how one women’s death ignited protests in Iran - podcast

Mahsa Amini died in custody after being detained by Iran’s ‘morality police’. In the 13 days since her death, thousands have taken to the streets to protest against the country’s hijab laws

Mahsa Amini, 22, was with her brother at a train station in Tehran when she was stopped by the ‘morality police’. She was accused of not complying with the country’s hijab rules. She was detained, and three days later she was dead.

While the government argues that she had underlying health conditions, her family and thousands of protesters believe she was killed.

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29th September 2022 04:00
The Guardian
Hurricane Ian leaves Cuba without power as storm heads towards Florida – video

Cuba’s electricity grid has collapsed, leaving the entire country without power after Hurricane Ian brought destructive wind and flooding to the western parts on Tuesday. In Florida, businesses were shuttering and officials ordered 2.5 million people to evacuate before the arrival on Wednesday of what has been predicted to be a 'very severe' category-4 storm

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28th September 2022 05:04
The Guardian
Does Labour have a route out of Britain’s rolling crises?

As a currency crisis joins the cost of living crisis in the UK, Labour has taken a 17-point poll lead. Peter Walker reports from the party’s conference in Liverpool

When Liz Truss took over from Boris Johnson this month it was with a promise to get Britain’s economy growing again and to lead the country out of its post-Covid crisis. Last week her chancellor, Kwasi Kwarteng, announced a series of measures aimed at turbo-charging the economy by cutting taxes, mainly for those on the highest incomes. The response was immediate: disbelief among many voters struggling with the cost of living, and dismay from investors, who promptly raised the cost of government borrowing and sent the value of the pound plunging to record lows.

While there was this sense of government disarray, Labour members met for their annual conference in Liverpool. As Peter Walker tells Hannah Moore, Keir Starmer had two jobs this week: to spell out his critique of the government and to offer voters a viable alternative. With a general election less than two years away, there is a new confidence to Labour, now 17 points ahead of the Tories in a new poll.

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28th September 2022 04:00
The Guardian
Joy and jubilation as Nasa crashes spacecraft into an asteroid in 'planetary defence test' – video

Nasa’s Dart spacecraft has crashed into the asteroid Dimorphos 6.8m miles from Earth in the space agency’s first “planetary defense test”. Dart (Double Asteroid Redirection Test)  collided head-on with an asteroid the size of a football stadium on Monday in an unprecedented full-scale test of Nasa’s capacity to defend Earth from a doomsday scenario. The test was humanity’s first attempt at moving another celestial body, to see if a large asteroid hurtling towards Earth could be diverted

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27th September 2022 02:16
The Guardian
Space station flies over Hurricane Ian – video

Footage released by Nasa shows a view of Hurricane Ian that can be seen from the International Space Station as it flies over the storm. Hurricane Ian moved near the Cayman Islands and closer to western Cuba early on Monday on course to hit Florida as a major hurricane this week. A surge of up to 2.4 metres (8ft) of ocean water and 25cm (10in) of rain, with as much as 38cm (15in) in isolated areas, is predicted for the Tampa Bay area. That is enough water to inundate low-lying coastal communities

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26th September 2022 23:53
The Guardian
Leading economies sliding into recession as Ukraine war cuts growth, OECD finds

Impact of energy and inflation crises worse than forecast, with Europe most directly exposed to fallout of Russian invasion

The world’s leading economies are sliding into recession as the global energy and inflation crises sparked by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine cut growth by more than previously forecast, according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

A dependency on expensive gas for heavy industry and home heating will plunge Germany, Italy and the UK into a long period of recession after global growth was projected by the OECD to slow to 2.2% in 2023 from a forecast in June of 2.8%.

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26th September 2022 19:55
The Guardian
Super Typhoon Noru hits the Philippines forcing thousands to flee – video

Super Typhoon Noru has slammed into the Philippines, battering the heavily populated main island of Luzon with strong winds and heavy rain that have forced thousands of people to flee their homes. The storm was packing maximum sustained wind speeds of 125mph (195km/h) after an unprecedented “explosive intensification”, the state weather forecaster said


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26th September 2022 05:25
The Guardian
Ill-fated Spanish village poised to be destroyed a third time

Settlers who restored abandoned village of Fraguas face prison if they can’t pay €110,000 to demolish it

The stone and slate church of Santo Domingo de Guzmán held out for almost 1,000 years before surrendering to the bullet holes that dot its walls, the brambles that twist from its masonry and the rains that hammer its last rotting roof beam.

So, too, did the ill-fated pueblo it once served.

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24th September 2022 06:00
The Guardian
Killing Leprechauns: Irish satirist mines British ignorance in comedy podcast

Oliver Callan questions British comics on Irish history and current affairs and finds general response is obliviousness

When Oliver Cromwell’s forces sacked the Irish town of Drogheda in 1649 and massacred its inhabitants the comedy potential seemed limited. Thousands perished and that was just the start of a military campaign that wiped out much of Ireland’s population before Cromwell returned to England.

Four centuries later, however, those dark events and other landmarks of Irish history have been mined for humour – and the joke is on the British.

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23rd September 2022 12:39
The Guardian
Iranians: share your views on the protests following Mahsa Amini’s death

We’d like to hear from people in Iran how they feel about the protests following the death of Mahsa Amini in custody

We’d like to hear how Iranians feel about the protests taking place in Iran after Mahsa Amini’s death in custody in Tehran.

Whether you have witnessed street protests directly or just want to share your views on the situation in Iran, we’re interested to hear from you.

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21st September 2022 13:12
The Guardian
Russians: tell us what you think about Putin’s escalation of war in Ukraine

We would like to hear views and opinions from Russians at this stage of the Russia-Ukraine war

Russia has announced a partial mobilisation in a major escalation that places the country’s people and economy on a wartime footing.

With president Vladimir Putin also threatening nuclear retaliation, we would like to hear from Russians about how ordinary people are reacting to the latest developments in the war on Ukraine.

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21st September 2022 12:33
The Guardian
Albania’s pelican colony was bouncing back. Now it faces the threat of a new airport

Narta lagoon’s Dalmatian pelicans were saved from extinction but now the government is building an airport in Vlora’s protected landscape

Half a dozen Dalmatian pelicans fly off as we approach the Narta lagoon, a marshland near Vlora in south-west Albania. It is a majestic sight – six elegantly soaring birds, with necks tilted back and wingspans almost matching that of an albatross. “They’re juveniles,” says Taulant Bino, head of the Albanian Ornithological Society (AOS). “They might start their own family in the next years.”

Although Dalmatian pelicans (Pelecanus crispus) do not breed here, the lagoon serves as an important feeding site for the birds and many more species, including flamingos, gull-billed terns and Kentish plovers. Migratory birds use the lagoon as a stopover during their long journey between Africa and central and northern Europe. They are key Mediterranean wetlands, the type of habitat that covered much of the whole Albanian coast until Enver Hoxha’s dictatorial regime drained large swaths of it in the 1950s and 60s, in an attempt to eradicate malaria and develop the lowlands for agriculture.

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21st September 2022 08:30
The Guardian
‘We need more females on the frontline’: the women reducing gun violence in California

Elana Bolds, Tina Padilla and Claudia Bracho are leaders in the gang violence intervention field – from active shooter drills with children in Richmond to bringing in gang members to help with food distribution in Los Angeles. The Guardian follows their work in the community

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20th September 2022 16:05
The Guardian
Why is Vladimir Putin so obsessed with Ukraine?

Guardian correspondent Luke Harding chronicles the key historical events that led to the invasion of Ukraine, from the Euromaidan protests to the annexation of Crimea, and explains why Putin's belief that Russians and Ukrainians are 'one people' is rooted in history from a thousand years ago

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14th September 2022 11:41
The Guardian
Tell us: how have you been affected by the situation in Ukraine?

We would like to hear from people in Ukraine about events in the country. We would also like to hear from others who are affected

We would like to hear from people who are affected by the war in Ukraine. You can share news tips or experiences directly with our journalistsby getting in touch below.

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24th February 2022 10:33
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2nd September 2015 16:21